The Political Sword and TPS Extra at a Glance

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Is trickle down economics a fraud?
Ad astra, The Political Sword, 19 February 2017

The spectre of trickle down economics continues to haunt the political landscape, emerging again and again like a ghostly zombie from a dark, damp cave where it quietly moulders, refusing to die, always ready to be summoned by a believer. Not often is the term ‘trickle down’ uttered, and when it is, it is by opponents of the concept. Instead, the proponents tell us that giving tax cuts to the top end of town will benefit those at the bottom through more jobs and better wages. More…

Jesus wept
2353NM, TPS Extra, 16 February 2017

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse continues. In the past couple of weeks, the Commissioners have been hearing evidence from Catholic clergy. Some of the numbers are scary: More…

Alternative facts and transparency
2353NM, The Political Sword, 12 February 2017

Would you believe that I am a 25 year old self-made millionaire and spend my life travelling around the world – only if I can fly in an Etihad A380 equipped with “The Residence” three room suite (only plebs travel First Class apparently)!. I also have bankers beating a path to my door to lend me money for my latest development proposal, after all anything I touch turns to a platinum - plated investment opportunity. More…

Selfishness is political poison
Ad astra, The Political Sword, 5 February 2017

Amid the contemporary chaos of national and international politics do you wonder what is behind it all? Is there a common factor that might explain our own federal government’s failures, its incompetence, and its appalling behaviour?

Is there an explanation for the words, behaviour, and punitive actions of Donald Trump? Is there a common theme that explains Brexit, and the rise of extreme right wing and conservative movements across Europe and in America? More…

Computer says ‘no’
2353NM, The Political Sword, 29 January 2017

Once upon a time, someone came up with an economic theory that robbery was good for the economy. The theory was along the lines that the robbers get some extra cash and most of it will reappear in the economy at some point soon after the robbery; the bank or shop is insured for the loss so it gets its money back; and as the number of robberies per annum doesn’t exceed the insurance premiums that banks and shops pay, the insurance companies are not out of pocket either. Of course, the theory is rubbish as stealing money (regardless of the rationale) is just wrong: staff and innocent bystanders who are the real victims of robberies are likely to need considerable physical and mental health support for a long time and so on. More…
What to watch for in 2017
Ken Wolff, The Political Sword, 15 January 2017

As with most political issues, the following few questions are inter-related: Turnbull’s future may well depend on the economy, on whether or not a new conservative party forms and whether there is a Trump-inspired trade or currency war between China and the US; our economy may well depend on what Trump does in relation to China, let alone whether Morrison displays any understanding of economics; and so on. More…
In 2017 – let’s be the change we want to see
2353NM, The Political Sword, 1 January 2017

Well look at that. 2016 is finished and 2017 has arrived to present us with more challenges. To be brutally honest, 2016 wasn’t the best of years for those who prefer progressive policy, equality and fairness for all. Later this month, Donald Trump becomes president of the USA; at the time of writing Malcolm Turnbull still survives as prime minister of Australia; and the likes of Cory Bernardi and George Christensen seem to be in charge of the LNP’s policy settings, probably in spite of what Turnbull would like to think. In the past, articles at this time of the year have suggested that no one really cares about politics because the beach, tennis and cricket are too appealing. More…
Happy Christmas and New Year to all our Visitors
Ad astra, The Political Sword, 25 December 2016

This is the time to wish all our readers a Happy and Relaxing Festive Season with your Family, and to thank all who have sustained The Political Sword throughout 2016.
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The barbie bigot looks back on the year
Ken Wolff, The Political Sword, 18 December 2016

G’day ev’ryone. Welcome back to the barbie. The big news of the year has been elections, both here in Oz an’ in septic-land. I’ve been a bit quiet since the election ‘cause, after all, the result was a bit hard to take (an’ it was a bit cool an’ wet for a barbie for a while). Mal scraped in by a seat an’ really spat the dummy in his election night victory speech. It wasn’t really a victory at the time, ’though he claimed it was. Victory speeches are meant to be mag ... magnamus … gracious, but not Mal. He couldn’t understand how he almost lost. All the gloss an’ glitter, an’ the smile, were gone an’ he didn’t seem to know why. More…
The buck stops where?
Ken Wolff, The Political Sword, 11 December 2016

The old adage says ‘the buck stops here’ and it applies to managers, CEOs, government ministers and similar people when they take responsibility for what happens in their organisations, including mistakes. When applied in full it leads to people resigning if more serious mistakes are made even though the mistake was not personally made by them. But nowadays modern managers are more likely to point the finger down the ladder and say the blame lies there. What has happened to the old concept of responsibility? More…
The real bullies
2353NM, The Political Sword, 4 November 2016

A Brisbane 13 year old committed suicide last week because, according to his mother he was being bullied. He identified as being gay and apparently was being bullied at school. Rather than join the chorus of those who instantly know what was going on and speculate for a week or so until something else comes along, how about we look at the culture that seems to be genuinely regretful when a tragedy such as the death of a Brisbane school boy occurs but votes for and allows much greater crimes against our society to be celebrated. More…
The rise of political staffers: how people disappeared from policy advice
Ken Wolff, The Political Sword, 27 November 2016

In October Attorney-General Senator George Brandis got into a stoush with Solicitor-General Justin Gleeson, which ultimately led to Gleeson’s resignation. At one point Brandis attempted to turn the issue into an argument about what constituted ‘consultation’ but the real issue was that Brandis had decided his office should have control of what advice could be offered by Gleeson — Gleeson would not have been allowed to provide advice unless the request for advice was first approved in Brandis’ office. More…
Trump’s Uncertainty Principle
Ad astra, The Political Sword, 23 November 2016

Way back in 1927 German physicist Werner Heisenberg, described the Uncertainty Principle that applies to quantum mechanics. It states that the more precisely the position of a particle is determined, the less precisely its momentum can be known, and vice versa. With apologies to Heisenberg and quantum physicists, the uncertainty principle seems to be a suitable metaphor for America’s President Elect. More…