Proud to be a bigot: a view from the barbie


Everyone knows about George Brandis’s now famous comment:

People do have a right to be bigots, you know. In a free country, people do have rights to say things that other people find offensive or insulting or bigoted.

I have decided to take him at his word and tell Tony Abbott to eff off back to where he came from. He arrived here as a £10 pom and I will willingly refund his £10 (or $20 in real Australian money) if he takes the next boat home — perhaps we can spare him an orange life boat for the journey. Why wasn’t his boat stopped at sea and turned back? Given what he is doing to Oz, he must certainly rank as an ‘undesirable’ immigrant.

Yes, before the conservative critics start pointing out that Julia Gillard was born in Wales, in my bigoted view someone born in Wales (or Scotland or Ireland) ranks considerably higher than a conservative wanna-be toff born in England. If you doubt my ‘wanna-be toff’ comment, why did he re-introduce Knights and Dames into the Order of Australia? We got rid of those stupid, meaningless titles years ago but obviously a pom like Abbott still thinks they are important to Oz — where’s he been for the past 30 years? Perhaps he is hoping that one day one of his successors will offer him a title for all the great work he has done. But I’m not sure where he thinks this ‘great work’ will be done: it’s certainly not here in Oz going by his current performance.

Why do we need a pom running our country? He’ll only ruin it. Sorry, he already is, as James Wight pointed out so well in his piece here on TPS.

Although he may have arrived here as a kid (and I mean that in both senses of the word because in my humble view he is a goat), he doesn’t seem to really understand this country. I don’t know what he was doing when growing up out here but it certainly wasn’t in any way, shape or form giving him a genuine understanding of the Australian way of life. I haven’t seen him at the pub.

He pretends he is one of us but he tries too hard. Who else but Abbott still appears on the beach in budgie smugglers? Anyone who does is up themselves, thinks they are Adonis, or god’s gift to women — in my blatantly bigoted opinion, that fits Abbott to a tee. He walks with an exaggerated swagger — ‘look at me, look at me’, it says, ‘ain’t I the best thing since sliced bread’. He is a ‘big head’ and that is un-Australian. He seems to think he deserves to be a Knight, or perhaps a Lord, who can tell the rest of us what is good for us — as long as it is also good for him and his up-town mates. Sorry (again), he’s already doing that as well.

He bicycles. He jogs. He is a member of the volunteer bush fire brigade, at least when it presents a photo opportunity. He is a member of a surf live-saving club but you wouldn’t think so the way he treats the rest of us. There are plenty of others doing those volunteer jobs who never make it onto the telly and they deserve all the praise and credit they get but when someone turns up for the photo that will appear in tomorrow’s papers, you have to ask yourself: is this bloke for real?

And he sleeps with the police! What sort of bloke sleeps with the police and doesn’t go home to his missus? Yeh, I know that they’re repairing the Lodge but they rented some posh place for him and his family — $3000 a week as I recall: I wouldn’t mind earning $3000 a week, let alone being able to afford pay it as rent. Why didn’t he take that place and have his wife with him? Doesn’t she want to be with him? Perhaps she had enough of seeing him every day during the 2013 election campaign. Yeh, that was different. He didn’t want to sleep with police then. He wanted his missus in every second picture then — and his daughters. Where is she now? Have you seen her recently? — other than in Abbott’s Christmas address, and then she looked very uncomfortable. I don’t doubt that they’re a fairly normal family (as ‘normal’ as any family can be) but, gees, I can’t figure it out.

He thinks women should be at home doing the ironing. Yeh, sometimes I think that wouldn’t be too bad. Would save a lot of money with the child-minding. But we wouldn’t have a home for the cheese and kisses to do the ironing in if she didn’t work. And I don’t need a whingeing pom telling me or the missus what she should be doing. He’s the one who’s making it harder for us to survive without the missus working, and now making it harder even when she is. He’s supporting the top end of town and our wages now aren’t even keeping up with inflation. Does he expect we should thank him for that — pig’s a*se! (or ‘ass’ as the septics would say).

I thought he said he would govern for all Australians but so many are missing out now. What happened to the Oz we knew where we looked after each other; where we did try to give everyone a fair go; when the government helped people who were down on their luck; when the government actually supported our local industry. Now if a factory decides to go to India or Vietnam, or some other cheap place, all the men and women under 30 who lose their jobs won’t get a cent for six months. Don’t tell me that’s fair! Yeh, there might be a few bludgers avoiding work but that’s no reason to take it out on everybody else who genuinely needs a hand. It’s more likely to make it harder to get a job.

He promised that abolishing the carbon ‘tax’ would help us with our cost of living and that it was his major achievement for women. I’m sure every woman in the land has thanked him for that! Yeh, there was a bit of a reduction this year but it’s a one-off. It will disappear in no time because electricity prices are still going up. And isn’t he worried about the kids? What sort of planet are we leaving them unless we do something about climate change? He can talk about it all he likes but he isn’t doing anything! He’s off in la-la-land, off with the fairies at the bottom of the garden and there’s no such thing as climate change in that garden.

He also promised ‘no surprises’ and it really was no surprise when there were surprises. Why can’t politicians ever tell the truth? We all know now that whenever a conservative government is elected, it will immediately drop most of its promises (that they made to us to get elected in the first place) and blame the previous Labor government for leaving a financial mess. It’s become a game and is so predictable: yet, as voters, we go into elections with the hope that, this time, they might actually keep their promises. They don’t have to look very far to realise why we don’t trust them anymore.

Abbott reckons he hasn’t broken any promises. He says we weren’t listening carefully enough to what he said. You can’t understand a pom at the best of times let alone when one like Abbott is twisting words to suit himself. How are we supposed to know what he means when half-the-time he doesn’t seem to know himself? And he takes so long to get a sentence out that we’ve given up listening before he’s finished.

Then he tried to big-note himself on the world stage. What a joke! He said he wanted to ‘shirtfront’ Putin. I bet that had the Russians quaking in their boots: more likely rushing to their dictionaries to find out what the hell he meant. Somewhat loses its effect, don’t you think, if the other bloke has to look up a dictionary to find out what you mean before you thump him.

Like Howard before him, he reckons that any job is better than no job. He would say that, wouldn’t he, when he’s never done a day’s labour in his life. He wouldn’t even have a parliament house to swan about in if it wasn’t for hundreds of labourers who built the place! But look at how he treats working people. He seems to think he’s lord of the manor and we are just his serfs — well, serfs for him and his mates. They think they own us and we should be happy that they’re providing work for us, even if some of them (and I won’t mention names) think we should be working for $2 a day.

Abbott wants to bring back Workchoices — under a new name of course because his mob ‘buried’ Workchoices years ago. They might have taken it off life-support but it didn’t die. He wants more individual work contracts — no awards and conditions just what the lord of the manor is willing to give you. It’s a bit hard to fight back on your own but that’s Abbott’s pommy world. And you’ll be arrested for poaching, for trying to get a feed for your kids. I can foresee it all.

The rest of his mob may not be poms but they’re just as bad. Foghorn Leghorn and Schwarzenegger having cigars when they handed down their budget that attacked working people and the poor. It reminds me of an old Irish song, ‘The rocks of Bawn’ and the lyric:

Come all you loyal comrades wherever you may be
And don’t hire with any master ‘til you know what your work will be
For you must rise up early from the clear daylight of dawn
And I know you’ll never be able to plough the rocks of Bawn

A curse attend you Sweeney for you have me nearly robbed
A-sitting by your fireside with your dudeen in your gob

(A ‘dudeen’ is an old Irish clay pipe.)

It all fits doesn’t it? And shows that the poms like Abbott haven’t really changed. They kept the Irish down. They kept the Irish in Australia down in the early years. And they keep the workers down. They want us to do the impossible, like ‘plough the rocks of Bawn’, while they sit there smoking their cigars. And you wonder why I’m bigoted!

I can finish with some fine English words that a wanna-be toff like pommy Abbott might understand: ‘You and your toffs, just naff off back to Eton’.

What do you think?

TPS presents this piece as a warm-up for the year ahead, just to get us back into a politcial frame of mind and boost the political spirits.

Our first serious post for the year will appear next Sunday. But watch out later in the week for a special post about some changes for TPS in 2015.



And that was . . . 2014


Welcome to 2015. Happy New Year from The TPS Team.

Traditionally The Political Sword tends to avoid too much politics and media bashing in January as in reality Australians are more interested in the beach, cricket, being with friends and complaining about how hot/cold/unusual the weather is. While it would be easy to write a piece about the less than impressive record of the Abbott Government, there are other sites already expending much effort on this — some examples are here and here — and in any event Ad Astra foretold the reality in 2012 but boasting of TPS’s past achievements in the first post of the year is not a good look! However we digress.

It’s often said that a week is a long time in politics. While the daily news cycle gets faster and less detailed, let’s look back at 2014 and see if there really was that much change in Australian politics during the year.

The newly minted Abbott Government came to power late in 2013 in part by pointing out that the leader of the other side of politics was either a liar or so controlling his supporters had to sack him. The federal government opened 2014 having to put out a minor bushfire over who was really running the country, the elected politicians or the Prime Minister’s Chief of Staff, Peta Credlin.

Senator Abetz told a Senate estimates hearing last week: "At the end of the day it was decided by the Prime Minister as to who would be appointed to my ministerial staff and to the staff of my ministerial colleagues,"

As revealed by Fairfax, Ms Credlin has insisted that all 420 government staff appointments right down to junior electorate officers are approved by the panel.

The ‘axing’ of the ‘carbon tax’ was a work in progress early in 2014. Despite promising that the repeal of the carbon pricing scheme would be one of the first actions of the Abbott Government, reality hit when it didn’t pass the Senate. Abbott had to wait until the Senate changed to get a ‘watered down’ repeal of the necessary acts of parliament through with the assistance of Clive Palmer’s Palmer United Party. Various utilities are now passing back the ‘savings’ that were made by the repeal of the ‘carbon tax’. When Ipswich City Council in Queensland recently announced that a refund to ratepayers would be paid just in time for Christmas and average $14.04, the response was rather underwhelming according to the Queensland Times:

Carla Kompenhans posted: "$14; early Christmas present? Are you serious? I don't know anyone who would be excited about that.

"What part of Christmas will that cover exactly?"

In 2014, Australia was the ‘Chair’ of the G20 Group of Nations; consequently the Finance Ministers’ meeting was held in Cairns and the Heads of State meeting held in Brisbane during the latter part of 2014. The leadership of the Australian government (Prime Minister Abbott) was also keen to keep climate change off the agenda at the G20 meetings — much to the concern of the Europeans. With China and the USA announcing an agreement to actively reduce carbon emissions by up to 28% below 2005 levels on the Wednesday prior to the G20 Heads of State meeting, the subject was never going to go away. Widely reported was Obama’s speech to University of Queensland students in suburban ‘Brisvegas’ where he discussed his, China’s and the United Nations concerns about climate change and carbon emissions.

He then described the impact of climate change on Australia:

Here, a climate that increases in temperature will mean more extreme and frequent storms, more flooding, rising seas that submerge Pacific islands. Here in Australia, it means longer droughts, more wildfires. The incredible natural glory of the Great Barrier Reef is threatened. Worldwide, this past summer was the hottest on record. No nation is immune, and every nation has a responsibility to do its part.

Obama also called on the country to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions:

And you’ll recall at the beginning, I said the United States and Australia have a lot in common. Well, one of the things we have in common is we produce a lot of carbon. Part of it’s this legacy of wide-open spaces and the frontier mentality, and this incredible abundance of resources. And so, historically, we have not been the most energy-efficient of nations, which means we’ve got to step up.

Abbott’s response, as reported on the Mashable website, was less compelling.

In contrast, Abbott told reporters that the U.S. and China have a far greater responsibility to address climate change than Australia does. “China emits some 24% of global carbon dioxide,” Abbott told reporters in Canberra on Nov. 14. “The U.S. emits some 15% of global carbon dioxide. By contrast, Australia’s about 1%. So, I think it’s important that they do get cracking when it comes to this.”

Despite Abbott’s wishes, the final communiqué from the Brisbane G20 included some action on climate change. Turkey is the ‘Chair’ of the G20 in 2015 and has stated support for a number of climate measures in the past.

No recollection on political events within Australia in 2014 would be complete without a reflection on the life of Edward Gough Whitlam. It is claimed that Gough Whitlam made the ALP electable again. Geoffrey Robinson writing on The Conversation website suggested that the claim Whitlam was solely responsible for making Labor electable may be overblown:

The truth is more complex and interesting. Whitlam was a man for his time: his achievements were representative of new and old social movements, including the emerging progressive intelligentsia, feminists, non-Anglo migrants and the working class.

Robinson also observes

Like Keating or Julia Gillard, Whitlam has functioned as what cultural theorists call a “floating signifier” — a symbol whose power and significance is necessarily distantly connected to historical events. “It’s Time”, “the sweetest victory of all” and the “misogyny speech” exist in a world of symbols but are none the less real for this.

While there doesn’t seem to be a 1972 campaign advertisement for the Liberal Party online (if you find one, please post the link below the line), the performance of then Prime Minister McMahon on Mike Willesee’s A Current Affair is a stark contrast to the Labor Party’s ‘It’s Timeelection campaign and probably explains in part why the Liberal Party was not re-elected.

Fast forward to November 2014, and the Victorian state election. The Liberal/National coalition was removed from office after one term by the ALP, led by Daniel Andrews, who came from behind to win the fancy office in Spring Street. The common opinion at the previous election was that the ALP (then led by John Brumby) would retain Government with a reduced margin with the polls for the then state Liberal leader (Ted Ballieu) rising and falling in line with the corresponding falls and rises of Gillard’s ALP government in Canberra. Ballieu had won then but didn’t even last out the four year term as premier, being replaced by Denis Napthine soon after Rudd replaced Gillard. While Newman is still premier of Queensland, there seems to be a concern within the ranks of the LNP that Newman may also lose his seat and the LNP lose Government early in 2015 when the next Queensland election is due. The Abbott government is significantly less popular than the ALP or in fact themselves when elected some 18 months ago:

In opposition, Abbott liked to say that Julia Gillard was the most incompetent and untrustworthy prime minister in Australia's history.

The voters now have decided that they have found one that's more incompetent and just as untrustworthy.

"Only half of people polled said that Abbott is competent," says the Fairfax pollster, Jess Elgood of Ipsos.

"That's lower than for any prime minister we have figures for," a data set starting with Paul Keating in 1995.

Compared to Abbott's 50 per cent, the comparable figure for Gillard four months before she was deposed was 53 per cent.

Not a lot did change in the world of Australian politics in 2014. At the start and end of the year, we have the Prime Minister’s Chief of Staff being the news rather than managing the PM’s office. At the end of 2014, there are claims of disagreements with Foreign Minister Bishop and of ruling the government with an ‘iron fist’.

The media is still leading discussion on climate change and how to manage it (with price signals — such as a ‘carbon tax’ being mentioned as an effective mechanism), and that Abbott either is changing or should change his view that ‘climate change is crap’.

Governments in various jurisdictions around the country are still not doing well in polling after they have been accused of lying or not being able to organise themselves — with Victoria changing government; Queensland’s Premier implying he will lose the significant majority won at the 2012 event at the next election; and the Federal Government some 10% behind the opposition after 18 months. Australians are still complaining about the ‘carbon tax’ — this time the small refunds that are gradually making their way onto invoices from its repeal; and the country has lost another ‘person of renown’ in the guise of Gough Whitlam.

Let’s hope that 2015 is another year of civilised discourse on The Political Sword and that the genuine nature of the discussions here spreads to other blog sites, the media and our civilisation in general. Prime Minister Hawke achieved more results through building a consensus than Prime Minister Whitlam did by trying to crash through. Please keep your hatred for the mozzie that bit you at the BBQ last week — we on this site and on this earth genuinely don’t need it.

A bit of housekeeping to conclude this piece. The TPS Team will be reducing our output for January. The ability to comment ‘below the line’ will be open all month and we invite relevant comment as usual. There will be some new commentary posted during January on an irregular schedule (so keep looking). We will return to our weekly (or better) schedule on 1 February 2015. Be aware it’s not all sitting by the pool in the banana lounge for The TPS Team, there is usually one of us sitting near the computer with our finger poised over the ‘delete’ button for those that haven’t yet lost the hatred.

Happy New Year and may all you wish for come to pass. We look forward to your continuing support and comments in 2015.

The TPS Team



A year on TPS: 2014


As we come to the end of another year, please forgive a little self-indulgence as the TPS Team discusses what TPS has achieved in the past 12 months.

It was a year in which we saw Abbott and his cronies trying to destroy the country and make us a paradise for the neo-liberals, the neo-cons and the economists that support them — and, of course, big business. We saw the worst budget in living memory and have, so far, only been saved from its full ramifications by the senate. We saw Clive Palmer appear with Al Gore to talk about the importance of climate change but, at the same time, cave in to support the repeal of the carbon price. We have seen Abbott, more through luck than design, deflect the budget issue and ‘bask’ in the glory of the world stage, taking on the Russian bear and alienating our closest Asian neighbour. He has ‘stopped the boats’ but also stopped government transparency in the process. He is undertaking more privatisation of government services and encouraging the states to do the same. Without openly saying so, he is pursuing a neo-liberal and economic rationalist agenda backed to the hilt by the IPA (and, as others have noted, he is, to a significant extent, following its ‘hit list’).

Talk Turkey has made the point numerous times about the need to keep up the fight against this government and what it is doing.

We believe TPS has been doing that but not always directly. We are not a news site, and with only a few people volunteering their time behind the scenes we could never be, so we do not react to every government announcement, no matter how bad. TPS sometimes takes a longer view, looking at socio-political issues and the political and economic philosophies that underpin this government, as Ad Astra also did at times.

We published 43 pieces during 2014 over 46 weeks: those 43 pieces actually encompassed 48 postings as we had four multi-part pieces and we also posted mid-week on a couple of occasions. We had six ‘guest’ writers during the year, now counting Ad Astra as a guest since he retired from full-time blogging, but 2353 and Ken provided the bulk of our pieces — 35 between them. We haven’t bothered counting the words but, given that most pieces are between 1500 and 2500 words in length, it would be getting towards 100,000 words. Plus all the words our friends have posted in their comments.

We didn’t ignore Abbott in our quest for wider truths and have launched attacks, both directly and with satire. We first asked whether Abbott remembered the twentieth century in his rush to take us back to some halcyon previous age; we wondered whether he was ever meant to be PM as he originally won his position as opposition leader by only one vote; we suggested he was a ‘con artist’ and questioned his Humpty Dumpty words; and James Wight exposed the extent of destruction wrought on our society in just one year. We presented ‘Tiny-er-er O’penmouth’ who morphed into ‘Tiny Napoleon O’penmouth’.

The LNP and the government more broadly were also in the spotlight in David Horton’s piece on LNP electioneering, Ad Astra’s piece on what underlay the budget, the government’s seeming blindness to major issues raised at the World Economic Forum at the start of the year, its links with the IPA, and the way it snuck through changes in its approach to climate policy during the 2013 Christmas/New Year break.

Political ethics were questioned by 2353 in several posts: he questioned the morality of using refugees for political advantage; the ethics of those who legislate hardship for many in the community but accept expensive gifts and high paid jobs requiring little work; their use of slogans and sound bites rather than taking the time actually to address issues; and asked why we allow politicians to regulate donations to their own parties when we have witnessed that self-regulation doesn’t work for industry. Twice 2353 specifically questioned the link between religious and political values asking how politicians could claim to be religious when implementing policies that clearly breach their religious morality. As Ad Astra commented, it is a brave man who addresses the religious link to politics.

As we have moved from being a ‘society’ to being an ‘economy’, we couldn’t ignore the underlying economic approach of the government and the rising inequality it gives rise to. Piketty’s work on inequality was discussed and was preceded by a piece showing how rising inequality matched the rise of the economic rationalist approach. Finally, Ken suggested that inequality wasn’t an economic question at all but the result of witchcraft (presented as some dark humour to end the year.)

It was also suggested that economic rationalism, after 40 years, may be on the wane: pieces like 2353’s on modern monetary theory and Kay Rollison’s on ‘middle out’ economics reinforced that there are new economic approaches emerging that may, indeed, lead to the demise of economic rationalism.

Kay’s piece was also presented as an alternative approach for Labor. It was one of five pieces that addressed new approaches for Labor, including the speech Ken would like to hear and Ad Astra’s letter that actually was sent to Bill Shorten.

Associated with economics, were pieces on governments’ approach to infrastructure and privatisation.

Ken presented a piece on our understanding of ‘freedom’ which, at first, may have appeared something from left-field, but it was a prelude to his discussion of the lack of freedom in the free market and the loss of social responsibility as the neo-liberal concept of freedom, embracing individual self-interest, took over political thinking.

We also briefly discussed Aboriginal affairs, the role of unions and the role of experts.

We prophesised the future with David Horton’s piece correctly suggesting that conservative governments resort to war in their quest for popularity; Ken’s piece on Abbott’s efforts to take us back in time foreseeing that coal would become more, not less, important in Abbott’s world; and 2353, in ‘The thought thief’, providing a fair reflection of what did eventuate from Pyne’s review of the national curriculum.

The one area we have been lacking this year is putting the media to the sword, other than for Jan’s two-part piece. Perhaps that is because some segments of the media now seem to be doing a better job: Abbott’s broken promises and the down-side of the budget were more widely reported (but still not so much in News Ltd papers). It has been our commenters who have continued to point out the flaws in the media’s approach, including the ABC’s attempts at so-called ‘balance’.

And throughout the year, Casablanca has continued to provide us with numerous links relevant to each post, as well as other news of the day.

We trust we have continued Ad Astra’s tradition by putting the sword to Abbott as prime minister, the government and its policies more generally, its political ethics, its political and economic philosophy, and the approach of the economic rationalists and neo-liberals that support it.

Take the time during the break to revisit some of the pieces that were posted during the year and see what you think now that the year is coming to an end and you can see how the different posts tie together. If you have topics you would like us to address in 2015 please let us know, either in a comment or in a message to the Team (the Contact tab above).

This thread will stay open until 4 January, when another piece will be posted with an extended thread, so please post any new comments and insights you may have. And, as we asked last year, please also feel free to post any video, music video or photo that takes your fancy and that you may wish to share, with a short story as to why you selected it.

Wishing all our lurkers and commenters a happy festive season and looking forward to you being back with us in 2015.

The TPS Team



Time to resurrect witchcraft


Back in 1971 I wrote my honours thesis for social anthropology at Sydney University. Its theme was a link between witchcraft/sorcery beliefs and egalitarianism in native and peasant communities around the world. Given discussion earlier this year about inequality, I believe it has a relevance.

Its principle argument went something like this:

The basic concept of egalitarianism is that everyone is equal and has an equal share of abilities and resources. Of course, in reality, this is never quite true. And in those native and peasant communities, witchcraft was a common approach to explain the differences.

It worked in a number of ways. Those who rose above the norm and those who fell below it were prone to witchcraft, either being attacked by it or accused of it. (Please note that when I say witchcraft, I include sorcery — there was a difference in the anthropological literature of the time that wasn’t relevant to my thesis nor to this discussion. Also, I use the term ‘witch’ to include both males and females.)

Those who rose above the norm could include those who were ‘conspicuously fortunate’, those who had outstanding innate talent (such as a Bradman or a Mozart), and even the ‘big men’ of the village.

For those with talent, it helped explain why they were so good but it also helped keep them within the bounds of the community. While it may only be thought that their talent was a result of witchcraft, if they did not use that talent in acceptable ways, or if they boasted of their talent, it could become a public accusation, leading to public sanction.

Similarly ‘big men’ were recognised as being important for the community, particularly in its dealings with other communities, but they had to maintain the welfare and best interests of their own community or they would also be publicly accused of being witches.

Being ‘conspicuously fortunate’ is clearly an egalitarian crime. The threat of being accused of being a witch helped ensure that those people spread their wealth in socially acceptable ways — catering for large ceremonies, for example.

Those at the bottom (below the social norm) were rarely attacked by witchcraft but prone to being identified as witches, the ones paid to provide the potions or spells. This often related to an illness occurring after an argument between two people (and the argument most often related to one person having more than the other). Both sides of the issue would then have to be addressed, the argument (and which party paid the witch), and the role of the witch.

Some of this demonisation of those at the bottom, those falling below the social norms, can be seen in the European and North American witch trials. Elderly widows struggling to survive on their own and young women perceived as promiscuous were among those more commonly accused.

I saw this operating like three concentric circles reflecting the values of the community. The majority of people fell within the central circle. Then those who were different, the probable witches, operated within the second circle. As long as they remained within that second circle they could be tolerated in a somewhat ambivalent way, but if they moved beyond that second circle they had moved too far beyond the bounds of egalitarianism and would face sanction, exile, or even execution.

I read a simple example of this in a story by Camara Laye about an African childhood. A boy was with his uncle, the village headman, and as they worked their way along a field they were moving ahead of the other men. Then the uncle slowed down and the boy pointed out that the others were catching up. His uncle told him it was not good to get too far ahead. In my terms, he was reaching a boundary where greater success (his speed working the field) would be seen as extreme and probably the result of witchcraft.

Witchcraft in this way acts as a sanction to acceptable behaviour. One tries to stay within the egalitarian norms, even if those norms are somewhat extended within the second circle, so as to avoid witchcraft.

So there you have it in a nutshell. What does this mean for our society?

We no longer believe in witchcraft but perhaps we should.

The majority of us sit comfortably in the middle (within the central circle), follow social norms, at least within acceptable bounds, and are free from accusations of witchcraft. We understand disease much better and no longer need witchcraft or other supernatural sources to explain it. Although it is interesting that arguments or disagreements and the associated stress can lead to illness — perhaps we still need witchcraft to explain that and should focus more on the argument as the root cause of the illness so that the argument is dealt with before a cure is found.

We are much better off in terms of our material possessions but still find blatant displays of wealth unacceptable. When someone builds a house twice as big as those around it, or suddenly appears in a Porsche when everyone else has a Holden or a Toyota, we no longer accuse them of witchcraft but we may think they are crooks, or dealing drugs, or something similar.

We elevate and praise our successful artists and sports people but only so long as they don’t abuse their position or become ‘big heads’. When that happens they become dangerous to our social stability and an element of witchcraft comes back into play. They are seen not to have played by the rules and need to be brought down or cast out.

We accept that we need leaders and powerful people to protect us but are equivocal about their power. We have a democracy which is supposed to control that power but sometimes we wonder whether it does. Of course, we are outraged when we find the powerful misusing their power to increase their own wealth but, after a brief time, nothing really changes and we await the next occurrence.

Our society has its share of people who drop below the norm and they are often perceived as a threat. I think sometimes it is because it is a reminder that there but for a bit of luck goes any one of us. We are not always comfortable knowing they are there but generally we wish to help them back within the inner circle. Many, however, in their day-to-day activities, will avoid them if they can.

The poor and outcast may no longer be witches but they are demonised by the rich, the LNP government and the economic rationalists: they are too lazy to be helped. We are told they use the services and taxes of the core circle and reduce the services available for the rest of us within that circle. They are told by the rich and powerful that they can never get back into that inner circle except by their own efforts, that they are undeserving of help, but that approach is not fully in accord with the egalitarian values of the central circle, so the rich and powerful are treading dangerous ground.

And we have ‘the one per cent’ sitting at the top with all their wealth. How did they get there? Where I grew up, the common view was that almost all who were fabulously rich must have done something wrong, not necessarily illegal but certainly breaching the norms — a few deals that sailed close to the edge of legality, or a few mates abandoned or ‘knifed’ along the way, a bit of insider knowledge, tax avoidance (or should I say tax minimisation so as not to be sued) and so on. Of course, only the rich have this special knowledge and the resources to implement it.

As a society we seem to struggle to find good explanations for these situations, and perhaps find some of them puzzling, even troubling, but witchcraft explains them all.

The conspicuous displays of wealth are obviously the result of witchcraft. An ordinary person in the inner circle cannot get their Porsche any other way. They don’t need to be crooks, just witches. When they know that such conspicuous displays can lead to accusations of witchcraft, they will be less likely to step so far out of line.

The same goes for our successful artists and sports people. They will behave in more acceptable ways if they know that they are always on the verge of a witchcraft accusation because of their ‘unnatural’ talent.

Our leaders may need their witchcraft to counter the witchcraft of other leaders but if they know that we know they are witches then they may be more careful how they use that power. They will know they need to support the central circle or face public accusation and the sanctions that follow.

If those who drop below the norm are thought more likely to be witches, perhaps we will work harder to bring them back into the central circle and so tame their witchcraft. And we will work to keep them in the inner circle because if they drop back again, anything could happen — we might all be turned into sheep (if the rich and powerful have not already turned us into sheep).

Alternately, we may draw on their magic to bring the rich and the powerful into line. While they are there, they are also a threat to those at the top — a reminder that the second circle belongs not just to the rich and powerful but the poor and outcast, that they are in reality in the same situation, operating outside the core values of the society. The poor and outcast have their own spells to attack the rich and powerful and it is a potential battleground for witchcraft.

Finally, how did the super-rich gain all that wealth? Bugger economics! — it was witchcraft pure and simple. They have the secret knowledge that they share only within their cabal.

It follows that they demonise and accuse those at the bottom, the others occupying those outer circles, of witchcraft because they are so conscious of it and fear being accused themselves. The rich and powerful (and the LNP) persecute these other witches to divert attention from their own witchcraft.

I say it is time to bring back witchcraft. It will support our egalitarianism and help us explain so much. We would not need economic arguments to explain inequality, just witchcraft.

We can bring back the witch trials and place ‘the one percent’ before the Witchfinder General. Then let them try to explain that they did not achieve their wealth by witchcraft. We can ask the banks and global corporations to show that, in making their super profits, they have not beguiled us with witchcraft. We can demand that the current prime minister justify his accusations of witchcraft against a certain red-haired former prime minister and, if he can’t, it follows that he, himself, was using witchcraft.

There may be many executions to follow. I think, however, that I could be tempted to become a tricoteuse at the bonfires.

What do you think?