Who's been playing in MY estate? Yet more ferment in the fourth and fifth

When is a writer not a journalist but a blogger, and when is a writer/blogger a journalist? Who decides? Does it matter?

Traditional or mainstream or 'old' media, and its power affiliates, are pushing back at the moment against the proliferation of small 'new media' online ventures fighting to be heard. Those broking power in the world of media are pushing hard because, as political commentator and ex-Press Gallery journalist Mungo MacCallum states, “these are not normal times and those making the judgements [media owners, editors, journalists] are anything but impartial”.

Three incidents highlighting the tension in the journalist/blogger, blogger/journalist dynamic occurred in media-world in the last few weeks.

Callum Davison [@callumdav], a freelance journalist, who had sought accreditation as Press Gallery representative for Independent Australia [@independentaus], received notification that he had been knocked back.

Then blogger, commentator and author of The Rise of the Fifth Estate (2012), Greg Jericho [@GrogsGamut], notorious overnight for being 'outed' from his blogger pseudonym by The Australian's James Massola, was hired as a journalist by the not-quite-yet-launched Guardian Australia (online). (Tweet: “Katharine Viner @KathViner Delighted to announce: #GuardianAUS joined by @NickEvershed, @GrogsGamut, @SimonJackman, @bkjabour, @heldavidson, @olliemilman, @mikewsc1 12:06 PM - 1 May 13”).

As well, on Monday 29 April, a new kid on the online publication block launched, its aspirations embedded in a somewhat classically titled masthead: The Citizen [@thecitizenweb].

These events resurface questions of who gets to define who is or is not a working journalist, how that defining occurs and to what standards a journalist, once defined as such, should be working – including ethical standards. If Callum Davidson (who holds a journalism degree and has worked freelance) can't be a Press Gallery member, could – if he wanted to and applied – Greg Jericho, who may never have actually worked as a journalist before? What about Margaret Simons, now overseeing The Citizen, who certainly has worked as a journalist?

We know that many journalists from newspapers and magazines now producing in digital and print media have jumped or been pushed in the last year or two. It's been hard not to hear the cries of anguish across the industry (especially if you follow journalists on Twitter). But we may be less aware of just how steadily the fourth estate has been bleeding into the so-called fifth and how many people who have worked as journalists are doing or have done real time in behind any number of online ventures that Twitter tags #newmedia. (Nor is it easy to clarify just how many once-were-bloggers have slid the other way across the divide into working as a journalist with reasonably established traditional media, albeit, as with Guardian Australia, on a digital end-product only.)

What does this two-way drifting make of the so-called divide between the fourth estate and the fifth? Are they still pretty much at standoff, with the fourth accusing the fifth of pea-green envy because they want to be the fourth, but don't have the 'right' credentials? Or, are they collaborating more, as Greg Jericho suggested should happen in his The Rise of the Fifth Estate? Or is the fourth trying to annex aspects of the fifth it can make fit old media models, while still pushing back against aspects it finds threatening?

Looking at how some of the #newmedia sees itself proffers some first clues, perhaps.

Amongst the more established online ventures set up by, or sometimes employing, journalists, New Matilda [@newmatilda] describes itself as an 'independent journalism site'; Independent Australia [@independentaus] as an 'online journal'; The Global Mail [@TheGlobalMail] as a 'not-for-profit news and features website'; The King’s Tribune [@TheKingsTribune] as a magazine, now in the form of a subscription email; and The Hoopla [@TheHoopla] as an 'online news and magazine site'. 

Then there's Crikey [@crikey_news], which describes its own 'mode of delivery' as 'website and email' and its mission (partly) thus:

“Crikey sees its role as part of the so-called fourth estate that acts as a vital check and balance on the activities of government, the political system and the judiciary.”

Crikey described The Citizen as 'a new site featuring the work of students, staff and freelance writers'. This is a tad disingenuous given that The Citizen, while first stating that it is a 'teaching tool', also states:

Finally, THE CITIZEN aims to be a serious and worthwhile publication in its own right, with an emphasis on quality journalism that, in part, seeks to ‘back fill’ on issues and events neglected by mainstream media battling cut-backs and cost constraints.”

This makes The Citizen not just a 'site' (for students), but a publication in direct competition with Crikey. Experienced ex-mainstream journalist and now academic Margaret Simons is Editor-in-Chief of The Citizen and Simon Mann, ex-The Age, amongst other things, is Editor. If you don't know Margaret Simons’ work, and her very lateral thinking on where journalism is headed, her 2012 e-book is available from Amazon: Journalism at the Crossroads: Crisis and Opportunity for the Press. Reading Chapter 5: 'The Citizen's Agenda' should prove illuminating.

Of the online ventures mentioned so far, most see themselves as paperless equivalents of newspapers or print magazines, thereby claiming a space in the fourth estate.

Well may they claim, but are they staking in very soft sand?

There are other online ventures, too, that just may be making claim. These began life more as blogs: community blogs set up for contributions by a group of writers, only one or two of whom might have a background in journalism or even public relations. They tend to describe their raisons d'être in similar terms to one of the aims of The Citizen, that is 'to fill the gaps', even if their motivation seems more frustration with the inadequacies of political reportage in the mainstream, or resisting what they see as bias in the existing media, than with omission via industry cost and cut-back.

There's Australians for Honest Politics (AFHP) [@NoFibs]. With a 'sub-banner' of 'Citizen Journalism' it describes itself as 'a new citizens journalism project in the tradition of one of the first, Webdiary'. Webdairy was in turn a first citizen journalism effort run initially under the Fairfax banner by journalist Margo Kingston [@margokingston1] and later run as an independent venture by her and others. Kingston argued strongly that Webdairy was not a blog, partly because a community of citizens wrote for it, and one would guess she might argue the same for AFHP, which she set up with Tony Yegles [@geeksrulz] who had some background with Webdairy in later years. Whether Kingston considers AFHP to sit within the fourth or the fifth estate might be gleaned from her 'outsider' comment:

“Me, I feel relaxed and comfortable sitting outside the system looking in. In my day, I was the first highly paid mainstream ‘blogger’, regularly on radio and TV. The nasty right, exemplified by Tim Blair, were the volunteer outsiders. Now Tim is ensconced in News Ltd, Andrew Bolt is the most-read mainstream blogger, and I’m the volunteer ignored by the MSM.

“Times change. I like where I am more than where I was. Because I’m free.”


There's the Australian Independent Media Network (AIMN), which has the subtitle 'An information alternative'. Its welcome post also flags the term 'citizen journalist'. It references Tim Dunlop's [@timdunlop] piece Media pass: citizen journalists need an industry body whose headline paragraph states: 

“Australian bloggers have a lot to offer in public debate, but an independent body is needed to establish the credibility and increase the exposure of our citizen journalists …”

and whose last sentence reads:

“Diversity of opinion is vital to the proper functioning of a democracy, but diversity without reach is just noise.”

AIMN's welcome post also notes:

“Over the coming days and weeks you’ll see this site take shape and the network develop, followed by what we endeavour to be quality, unbiased, balanced, independent journalism.”

And then there's Ausvotes2013 [@Ausvotes2013]. Is it a bird, is it a plane, is it – Superblog? The last, it seems, since it has just won the 'Commentary' category of the Australian Writers' Centre Best Australian Blogs 2013 (where one of the judges was Greg Jericho). With a subheading of 'Election policy wonkage and much more' it describes itself as a 'group blog' and states:

“The concept for this blog is simple – to provide the observations, analysis and opinion that are missing in the traditional media’s coverage of the election. In short, to provide the perspectives we wish we could read in the MSM.”

But to return to the The Citizen, it seems, then, to be competition not only for Crikey, but for any number of longer-term #newmedia ventures as well as a number of recent 'online start-ups', this latter term being one way the Canberra Press Gallery described the growing band of independent, small-press-like online presences seeking real (as opposed to virtual) space in the Press Gallery's wing at Canberra's Parliament House. This Crikey piece doesn't quite tell us why Independent Australia's freelance journalist Callum Davidson didn't make it into the Press Gallery although a further piece from AFHP adds the insider colour of parliamentary security needs.

But there's the rub. Neither in the office space nor probably in the needs of Parliament House security do we really find the answer to why a Press Gallery pass was refused to Callum Davidson.

One further reason is suggested by The Citizen's launch edition via a critical article from Sydney Morning Herald Contributions Editor, and sometimes freelancer, Gay Alcorn, Want to be a journalist? Bloggers, online media sites invited to sign on to ’journalism code of ethics'. She states:

“The journalists’ union, the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, wants to bring them into the professional fold, at least tentatively. And the Australian Press Council, which regulates press standards, says one of the most critical issues facing the media is defining who, exactly, is a journalist in the digital age.

“The union has approached 20 websites it believes have shown signs they are interested in ethics, accuracy and paying contributors once they earn enough to do so. It says that so far, 12 have signed up to the union’s ‘Charter of Excellence and Ethics’, to be launched mid-year.”


According to Alcorn, both The Hoopla and The King’s Tribune are among the 12 'websites' that have signed up to the MEAA's Charter. Via tweet on the 29th April, Margo Kingston advised she had signed on too – presumably on behalf of AFHP. (If Independent Australia did, would that mean Callum Davidson would be accepted by the Press Gallery?)

Alcorn's piece takes us back to the same issue Tim Dunlop raised. But Dunlop posited a different approach: that 'citizen journalists' might, rather than being drawn into existing press structures and regulation, band together in:

“… an informal framework that allows smaller websites to acquire advantages currently limited to what we might call the legacy media, the mainstream journalists, who, by convention as much as anything, are given society's permission to pursue stories.”

Clearly, the advent of online media and the blogger/journalist dichotomy is proving a conundrum to those who claim the 'inside'. All kinds of attempts to corral and brand the small online media ventures are being made, either by keeping them outside an 'august' institution such as the Press Gallery, or by pulling them into an arguably equally august institution, such as the MEAA (and offering access to Walkley Training, no less), or perhaps by offering a lesser version of the MEAA's approach, a kind of outside/inside position, as in 'band together, at least in a loose structure, but self-regulate'.

It's a conundrum raising some significant questions – especially for an election year.

If the role of the fourth estate is to keep check on the first to third, and the rise of the fifth has been to balance the perceived inadequacies of the fourth, is the fifth better not to join any part of the fourth's power structures? How well can you check and balance if you become part of what you are checking? Does one challenge the status quo best from inside or outside (or is that all false dichotomy?)

If the quality of journalism is plummeting into sensationalist partisan regime-change-bent 'crap', as is often being suggested in this election year, but the ownership is large and powerful, should all the small independents come together to provide some truly competitive weight? Or does coming together, perhaps as one media producer with many arms, or perhaps as a loosely affiliated regulatory body, undercut entirely the potentially more radical action available to many smaller and diverse voices?

Are we even asking the right questions?

Does joining the Press Gallery really matter for #newmedia, or is this a body now diminishing in power and 'on the way out', and different bodies are needed?


In the flurry of Twitter activity following Callum Davidson's rejection by the Gallery, Andrew Elder tweeted:

Andrew Elder @awelder @margokingston1 @MargaretOConno5 @SpudBenBean Current President is @PhillipCoorey, who despises socmed. Good luck. Am trying to abolish PG.”

Within 10 days Elder [@awelder] had written this: Shadows on the Press Gallery wall 2: Where the action isn't. He noted: 

Today, press gallery journalists still think they are Where The Action Is, despite many years of evidence to the contrary. They are confirmed in that opinion by their dull-witted editors, and by the boards of the organisations which currently employ them. When broadcast media laid off hundreds of journalists last year, the fact that very few jobs went from the press gallery was a sign that they'd botched it.”

Is it that journalism as we know it is, itself, defunct for what was once its reading public, as Bushfire Bill [@BushfireBill] very recently argued:

People will not pay to see their beliefs and ideologies, their aspirations and loyalties, their need to be informed and to remain so, trashed by two-bit gurus with a bully pulpit put at their disposal, rabbiting on in the most offensive way about dinner parties, leaks from insiders and their own benighted opinions.

“It just won’t happen”.


Last, but not least: PolitiFact has launched in Australia. Its Australian editor is former SMH Editor-in-Chief Peter Fray [@PeterFray].

Will it police across all media, old and new, checking facts? Via its 'Truth-O-Meter TM', will it hound to metered truth all journalist/bloggers or blogger/journalists? Should it? How would it decide, given the ceaseless ferment in the fourth and fifth?

Perhaps we should ask Peter Fray!


What do you think?

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19/05/2013Folks I’m sure you will enjoy this piece by Jan Mahyuddin @j4gypsy who has been posting comments and Twitter talk on [i]TPS[/i] for ages now as Janet (j4gypsy). This beautifully written and erudite piece details newcomers to the Fifth Estate, as well as some longstanding contributors, and traces the interaction between the Fourth and Fifth Estates and the movement of authors between the two. It is so packed with helpful information and links that you may find it useful to bookmark it for later reference, as I have done.

nasking

19/05/2013 Good stuff Janet. Refreshing to see a new poster...informative post asking some valuable questions. Useful use of links too...I hope readers explore the various alternative sites...nothing like discovering that the mainstream media are not the fonts of all knowledge...and realising that plenty who work in the increasingly corporatised media are more puppets on strings than independent thinkers, reporters, commentators. “[b]People sometimes imagine that just because they have access to so many newspapers, radio and TV channels, they will get an infinity of different opinions. Then they discover that things are just the opposite: the power of these loudspeakers only amplifies the opinion prevalent at a certain time, to the point where it covers any other opinion[/b].” ― Amin Maalouf, The First Century After Beatrice http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/journalism And: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Crusades_Through_Arab_Eyes N'

denese

19/05/2013AIMN's welcome post also notes: “Over the coming days and weeks you’ll see this site take shape and the network develop, followed by what we endeavour to be quality, unbiased, balanced, independent journalism =========================================================== may I ask which site , this site,or the authors site so is this site changing it s look sorry to be confused.

cuppa

19/05/2013The MSM are digging the hole for themselves and hammering the nails into the coffin. I, for one, will dance on the Old Media's grave. [i]When you should have informed us you let us down When you should have held both sides to account You closed one eye and gave one side a free ride When we hungered for analysis and expert insight You gave us your boss's Party lines When we screamed for fairness you gave us Spin Now as I watch you come undone I celebrate the state you're in.[/i]

Janet (jan@j4gypsy)

19/05/2013Hi Ad and Nasking, So nice to be playing in the TPS family with a slightly different hat on. Thank you for your lovely introduction, Ad, and for the opportunity to post here. (They say 'never follow kids and puppies'. I think it should be 'never follow Ad when he's just fed you a brilliant chook satire!' :-)) Nas (May 19. 2013 05:30 PM ): I absolutely love your Amin Maalouf quote. It covers, for me, precisely what seems to be happening in Oz's fourth estate: the 'amplifying of a prevalent opinion' or put in current-speak, amplifying a core and apparently unchangeable narrative. You are, as TT often points out, so widely read across subjects and available media from more than one country, I wondered what you really think about the concept of a Press Gallery, and its value to the whole political structure and cycle? Do other countries have them? And are they so closely aligned with the governance structure? I took a sneak peak at your link to journalism quotes and found a couple that made me chuckle because they relate one way or another to what Maalouf was getting at, and to taking a pretty hard look at the meaning of the Oz Press Gallery: “[i]The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers[/i].”  “[i]No honest journalist should be willing to describe himself or herseif as 'embedded.' To say, 'I'm an embedded journalist' is to say, 'I'm a government Propagandist[/i].”  ― Noam Chomsky, Imperial Ambitions: Conversations on the Post-9/11 World Cheers

Janet (jan@j4gypsy)

19/05/2013denese: May 19. 2013 07:47 PM Hi denese and I'm sorry, that bit is confusing isn't it. I was referring to the AIMN site (the quote is from its first couple of days after launching). [i]The Political Sword[/i] site wasn't being referred to and to the best of my knowledge isn't changing in any way :-). Cuppa: May 19. 2013 07:52 PM Cuppa, Is that verse your own? It's great: this line grabs: '[i]When we screamed for fairness you gave us Spin [/i]'. Yeah, exactly. The fourth is unravelling well. But one thing am interested in is how much the fourth might try to eat up the fifth in an effort to hang on …

Catching up

19/05/2013Yes, the sites are linking well. Reading many of the comments, there seem to be many, that are happy to finds an alternate view. Yes, believe things are changing. Maybe that million or more than a quarter of undecided are ready to get off the fence. With the polls at this time, the high don't knows or undecided, it is not a matter of changing votes, but waiting for a great number to make up their minds. If this is true, it could mean those numbers could change quickly. I suspect this is a new results when it comes to polls. Does anyone know, if it was the norm in the past, for this category to be so high, for so long.

Catching up

19/05/2013Yes, the sites are linking well. Reading many of the comments, there seem to be many, that are happy to finds an alternate view. Yes, believe things are changing. Maybe that million or more than a quarter of undecided are ready to get off the fence. With the polls at this time, the high don't knows or undecided, it is not a matter of changing votes, but waiting for a great number to make up their minds. If this is true, it could mean those numbers could change quickly. I suspect this is a new results when it comes to polls. Does anyone know, if it was the norm in the past, for this category to be so high, for so long.

Fiona

19/05/2013Excellent article, Janet - thank you so much. All the points you raise are important. As someone closely involved in one of those little websites, I'm inclined at this point to the view that we should disdain the lures of the 4th estate, and establish our own code of ethics. After all, the 4th estate haven't adhered to their own code very well, have they?

Patriciawa

20/05/2013Janet, great to see your work here at TPS. When I'm more relaxed and rested I'll try to respond to your question..... [quote]When is a writer not a journalist but a blogger, and when is a writer/blogger a journalist? Who decides? Does it matter? [/quote] Right now I have to go to bed after a really hectic day with a family re-union to remember our big brother who left this world recently after a long and blessed life. When everyone had gone home I struggled for ages with sizing the images for my latest post for Migs at http://cafewhispers.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/mr-rabbit-takes-centre-stage-but-will-he-regret-it-2/ As always, TT, here is the pome.....[b] Mr Rabbit Takes Centre Stage, But Will He Regret It?[/b] Mr. Rabbit of Downunderland Thought that he was in Wonderland. For one moment it felt truly As if he, with White Queen Julie, Were already restored to power, As he stood acclaimed, man of the hour. Applause and cheers were long and loud. His budget speech had moved the crowd. Up on to their feet as it ended They seemed to share his vision splendid Of himself rescuing from failure This [i]‘Triple A rated Australia!’[/i] His oratory had been inspired! Yes, the Gallery audience was hired. There to test his election theme, They’d loved his parental leave scheme, Freely joined his denunciation Of Labor’s burdensome taxation. Confirming Newspoll and Morgan They didn’t want a price on carbon! Nor tax on mines! These men were workers Not malingerers or shirkers. All loathed Julia, despised red Queen! Then reality intervened….. Because there she sat. And glared, As if to say, how had he dared! A stunt like this? In this Chamber? A dress rehearsal for September? In a theatre where centre stage Was hers? And now he’d put her in a rage…..

lyn

20/05/2013Today’s Links Tony Abbott’s 12 biggest budget reply porkie pies @independentaus And what’s with the ABC’s headline: ‘Abbott ‘honest, competent’ budget reply’?Do observers – in the media and the public – simply not notice when Tony Abbott tells porkies because we are so used to http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/politics/tony-abbotts-budget-reply-porkie-pies/ Responding to Steve Kates: more zombie shuffles by @beneltham So let’s just fast-forward and ask ourselves: has government stimulus in Australia crowded out private savings and raised the cost of capital? http://culturalpolicyreform.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/responding-to-steve-kates-more-zombie-shuffles/ Gross government debt under the Howard Government by @TheKouk Any effort to compare net debt, which did fall below zero under the Howard government, with some made up and as yet unsubstantiated guess for gross debt of “$400 billion” under the current government is a contempable distortion and should be called out as such http://www.marketeconomics.com.au/blog Worry more about the economy than the budget by @1RossGittins It is true, as you've heard, that the effect of all the spending and tax changes announced this week would (if they are implemented by the government that wins the election) improve the budget balance by a net $28.4 billion over five years. http://www.rossgittins.com/2013/05/worry-more-about-economy-than-budget.html 'Safe as Milk': Really? by Gary Sauer-Thompson the Coalition's central claim is that austerity will lead to economic growth. Underpinning this is the hypothesis of expansionary fiscal contraction. According to this hypothesis austerity might have expansionary effects in cases where households trust government http://www.sauer-thompson.com/archives/opinion/2013/05/safe-as-milk-re.php The numbers are in – and the Truth-O-Meter is running hot by @PolitiFactOz PolitiFact's Truth-O-Meter is going to be busy, if its first week is anything to go by. We're ready and willing to tackle the light and dark of politics, and bring a new level of accountability to politics. http://www.politifact.com.au/ Ethics overboard: How to promote integrity in the moment of choice by @margokingston1 What is a journalist? We cannot argue for special protections and exemptions from privacy laws unless we can distinguish ourselves from non-journalists. To me the essential requirement is commitment http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/ethics-overboard-how-to-promote-integrity-in-the-moment-of-choice/ Joe goes into bat and is hit with a Jones bouncer by @CoffsOutlook What followed was extraordinary radio, during which Jones harangued Hockey for subsidising wind and solar power, attacked the entire Medicare system as “unaffordable” and abused the shadow treasurer for not agreeing to his suggestion that Indonesia take Australian http://coffsoutlook.com/joe-goes-into-bat-and-is-hit-with-a-jones-bouncer/ Rupert, where’s the outrage by @MigloMT Now, didn’t the Henry Review recommend an increase in the GST? Rupert, your papers were in a frenzy the last time an increase was put in the public sphere and the outrage against the Gillard Government was carefully nurtured. http://theaimn.com/2013/05/18/rupert-wheres-the-outrage/ The Geek’s week in Twitter Pics by @geeksrulz My week on twitter 13 May to 19 May 2013. Some pics from me, some pics retweeted by my and some pics sent to me. http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/talking-pictures/ Rinehart’s Bleeding Heart Over Her Poor Business Model by @Mothincarnate It is mind-boggling that she can whine about the tax placed on profiteering on common goods, but then to state that “without mining and mining related industries, this country has no hope of repaying our record debt”. http://newanthropocene.wordpress.com/2013/05/18/rineharts-bleeding-heart-over-her-poor-business-model/ Abbott and Milne… When Blue and Green will never be seen! by Truth Seeker after the budget was released, one of the first interviews that I saw, after the MSM had partially exhausted the usual suspects, was Christine Milne rubbishing the ALP for some of their budget measures, http://truthseekersmusings.wordpress.com/2013/05/18/abbott-and-milne-when-blue-and-green-will-never-be-seen/ Ready to Lead by @AusVotes2013 They fail to appreciate the revulsion that a remarkable number of people feel towards Tony Abbott, and how many remain deeply skeptical of the man who, more than almost any other present day politician, yearns for the Howard days. http://ausvotes2013.com/2013/05/18/ready-to-lead/ Today’s Front Pages Australian Newspaper Front Pages for 20 May 2013 http://www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm News headlines http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

Ad astra

20/05/2013LYN'S DAILY LINKS updated: http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/page/LYNS-DAILY-LINKS.aspx

nasking

20/05/2013 Janet, the history of 'press galleries' per-say, is littered with controversy, discrimination, battles for accreditation and reform. This from Wikipedia to start with...looks primarily at USA...I will add more detail later, including [b]The Briefing Room, The Press Corps, press pool:[/b] [b]The press gallery is the part of a parliament, or other legislative body, where political journalists are allowed to sit or gather to observe and then report speeches and events. This is generally one of the galleries overlooking the floor of the house and can also include separate offices in the legislative or parliamentary buildings accorded to the various media outlets, such as occurs with the Strangers Gallery in the British House of Commons or the Canberra Press Gallery in the Australian Parliament.[/b] The United States Senate established its first press gallery in 1841, and both the House of Representatives and Senate set aside galleries for reporters when they moved into their current chambers in 1857 and 1859. ([b]The White House did not designate a press room until 1902[/b].) [b]The press galleries in Congress are operated by superintendents, appointed by the House and Senate sergeants at arms, and by Standing Committees of Correspondents, elected by the journalists.[/b] The first Standing Committee of Correspondents was created in 1879 to eliminate lobbyists from the press galleries. [b]With the approval of House and Senate leaders, reporters drafted a set of requirements for accreditation. Press passes were issued only to those whose primary source of income was journalism, and who reported by telegraph to a daily newspaper. The rules eliminated lobbyists, but also women and minorities. Nineteenth-century women reporters were confined to social news coverage, which did not justify the cost of telegraphing. African American reporters were limited to the black press, which were then all weekly papers. Not until the 1940s did women and minorities overcome these obstacles. In the twentieth century, the same rules denied press passes to radio reporters, unless they simultaneously reported for daily newspapers.[/b] In response to complaints from broadcasters, Congress in 1939 created a Radio Gallery in each house, later the Radio-TV galleries. Congress also established a Periodical Press Gallery for magazine and newsletter writers, and a Press Photographers’ Gallery. [b]By the 1990s, Internet reporters and bloggers began applying for press passes. After initial resistance, the press galleries adjusted their rules to admit those who earn their living from their journalism, and who are not underwritten by advocacy groups.[/b] Reporters who occupy the press galleries are known as the press corps. Now numbering in the thousands, they rely on similar press operations in all three branches of the government. [b]Despite the government’s efforts to accommodate the press corps, however, the relationship between the press and the politicians remains essentially adversarial, punctuated by politicians’ complaints of bias and misrepresentation, and by reporters’ protests against government attempts to manipulate the news.[/b] Wikipedia --- Of course, the USA has far more diversity of media and media ownership than Australia, including 24hr cable news...tho, many critics would say that the American mainstream media is extremely corporatised and major advertiser reliant...and therefore lacks independence. Vertical integration of media companies is seen as problematic too due to influence of profiteering interests on reporting of news... for instance, Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation has interests in both adult & children's television...newspapers, sports, magazines, movies, cable, book publishing...you name it. Furthermore, there seems to be a dwindling number of owners...[b]MURDOCH's News Corporation having picked up the highly influential Wall Street Journal.[/b]..with his eye on the L.A.TIMES and ever on the NY TIMES. [b]Tho, of course there is the growing influence on politics of social media, tweets and INTERNET sites such as blogs and NEWS AGGREGATION WEBSITES such as The HUFFINGTON POST providing headlines and links to established media and alternative sites...some offering up a range of original opinion and content.[/b] N'

2353

20/05/2013You'd have to wonder about the cost benefit of a Press Gallery in the 21st Century. The reality is that politicians connect directly (with varying degrees of success) with the voters that put them there and at the end of the day with the preponderance of opinion pieces rather than straight reporting of facts - in effect the press gallery is adding a filtering mechanism to a story that can be told directly to the person who "really" matters.

nasking

20/05/2013 [b]White House press corps[/b] From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [b]The White House Press Corps is the group of journalists or correspondents usually stationed at the White House in Washington, D.C., to cover the President of the United States, White House events, and news briefings. Their offices are located in the West Wing.[/b] [b]Semi-permanent setup of press corps on the west end of the north White House lawn[/b]. Live media broadcasts with the White House in the background are delivered from here. [b]The White House Press Secretary or a deputy generally holds a weekday news briefing, which takes place in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room. [/b] [b]The room currently seats 49 reporters. Each seat is assigned to one news gathering organization, with the most prominent occupying the first two rows. Reporters who don't have an assigned seat may stand. Often a smaller group of reporters known as the White House press pool is assembled to report back to their colleagues on events where the venue would make open coverage logistically difficult.[/b] When a new U.S. president is elected, some news organizations change their correspondents, most often to the reporter who had been assigned to cover the new president during the preceding campaign. For example, after the 2008 presidential campaign, ABC News moved Jake Tapper, who had covered Barack Obama during his presidential campaign, to the White House correspondent's position. Some White House correspondents have come under criticism for not challenging the people they cover more directly and thereby shirking their Fourth Estate responsibility. [b]A common criticism of the White House is that the top reporters are given priority access to the Press Secretary and are allowed follow-up questions, while those in the back rows are rarely called on.[/b] ---- How many of us have watched the popular show THE WEST WING and been thrilled by the intensity of the relationship between selected reporters, politicians, their aids and the PRESS SECRETARY? Yet, we must ask ourselves how diverse is the message coming from those who gain privileged access to the press secretary...what role does the Briefing Room seating plan play?...accreditation?...and so on. Are the people's interests promoted and represented? N'

Michael

20/05/2013The article here http://ausvotes2013.com/2013/05/18/ready-to-lead/ which actually settles on nothing to answer the 'is Abbott ready to lead?' question, does, however, in one of the following comments, bring up the matter of whether this man is suited to be a 'leader' in any real sense of both decision-making and team-framing. I think we can accept that Abbott is a 'team-framer', if only by default. Coalition politicians are so chuffed after the distaste of being roundly rejected in 2007 at having someone out front prepared to say and do anything to kick Labor that they accept Abbott in that function alone. He turned the tide. By apparently making Coalition government after the next Federal election a shoo-in, the 'team' won't do much to upset the momentum to ministries some of them have already been guaranteed by overtly questioning Abbott as the vanguard figure for their return to governing. Personally I don't believe Abbott would last long as PM because his own party are already allowing little fizzy burps of impatience to show through from the metaphorical election night champagne so tingly even this far out on their tongues. A Rudd-shaped 'knife' awaits him should he become PM. 'Team-framer' by default, tick to Abbott. 'Decision-maker'? I suggest not. He appears to be, but this is only within the context of the 'team-framing' argument laid out above. He's allowed to appear to be a decision maker so long as his team is in the home straight and ten lengths ahead of Labor. Those little fizzy burps from within the Coalition and without, amongst its business supporters and commercial backers, are lid-held-down-tight-till-we-cross-the-finish-line stuff, just in case the leading nag throws a shoe or snaps a tendon short of victory because his stablemates are crowding him. "That's just Tony", so often quoted as a get out of jail card for Abbott is, with the slightest change in inference, what will bring him undone. "That's just Tony' - 'that's all there is to Tony'. In short, Abbott's ability and readiness to be a leader are both illusions formed by those who figure luck and bad genes somehow synchronised to deliver the Coalition an individual who as 'leader' embodied just the right levels of innate bastardry and stupidity combined to beat up Labor and grab back government... and never see the chop waiting for him once that job was done. "Was" because he won't.

nasking

20/05/2013 A slight diversion...but Interesting info to take on board: [b]US NEWS MEDIA AND THE VIETNAM WAR[/b]: [b]Withdrawal, 1969–1973 [/b] [b]Nixon's policy toward the media was to reduce as far as possible the American public's interest in and knowledge of the war in Vietnam. He began by sharply limiting the press's access to information within Vietnam itself.[/b] The gradual dissipation of American support for the war was apparent in changes in the source of news stories. The traditional sources - press conferences, official news releases, and reports of official proceedings were less utilized than ever before. Reporters were doing more research, conducting more interviews, and publishing more analytical essays. [b]There was also an increase in the number of American homes that acquired a television set which led to a rise in people gaining their knowledge of the war from television. The media never became "acutely critical...but more sober, and more skeptical[/b] [b]It did not, however, examine or reexamine its basic assumptions about the nature of the war it had helped to propagate.[/b] [b]Never, for example, did historian Daniel Hallin hear an American correspondent or commentator utter the word Imperialism in connection with the U.S. commitment on television. On those rare occasions when the underlying reasons for the American intervention were explicitly questioned, journalists continued to defend the honorableness of American motives.[/b] Television's image of the war, however, had been permanently altered: the "guts and glory" image of the pre-Tet period was gone forever. [b]For the most part television remained a follower rather than a leader. [/b] [b]According to Daniel Hallin, It was not until the collapse of consensus was well under way that coverage began to turn around; and when it did turn, it only turned so far. The later years of Vietnam were "a remarkable testimony to the restraining power of the routines and ideology of objective journalism...'advocacy journalism' made no real inroads into network television."[/b] As the American commitment waned there was an increasing media emphasis on Vietnamization, the South Vietnamese government, and casualties - both American and Vietnamese. There was also increasing coverage of the collapse of morale, interracial tensions, drug abuse, and disciplinary problems among American troops. These stories increased in number as U.S. soldiers "began to worry about being the last casualty in the lame-duck war." The U.S. military resented the attention and at first refused to believe that the problems were as bad as correspondents portrayed them. The media demonstrated, however, "that the best reporters, by virtue of their many contacts, had a better grasp of the war's unmanageable human element than the policy makers supposedly in control." Tensions between the news media and the Nixon administration only increased as the war dragged on. In September and October 1969, members of the administration openly discussed methods by which the media could be coerced into docility. Possible methods included Internal Revenue Service audits, Justice Department antitrust lawsuits against major television networks and newspapers that could be accused of monopolistic business practices, and the monitoring incidents of "unfairness" by television broadcasters that would be turned over to the Federal Communications Commission for possible legal action. By the end of 1971 the number of accredited American correspondents had declined to fewer than 200. By September 1973 that number had dwindled to only 59. As the war became more and more a South Vietnamese affair, the Saigon government tried to silence unofficial news sources, tightening its information guidelines and stringently punishing any who violated them. Even as the Easter Offensive waned, President Nguyễn Văn Thiệu passed a martial law decree that made circulating news or images "detrimental to the national security" a criminal offense. With the breakdown of peace negotiations with Hanoi, President Nixon launched Operation Linebacker II, an extensive aerial campaign by B-52 bombers and tactical aircraft that began on 16 December 1972. Nixon, in an effort to conceal the fact that the talks had broken down, ordered that the public explanation for the bombing be linked to "a possible enemy offensive in the South." With no information flowing from the White House, the Pentagon, or MACV, North Vietnam's propaganda was all that correspondents had to go on and it was extensively reported by the media. The American people, however, were unconvinced. According to a Harris poll, fewer than 50 percent agreed that it was "inhuman and immoral for the U.S. to have bombed Hanoi's civilian center" and an impressive 71 percent believed "what we did in bombing Hanoi was no worse than what the communists have done in the Vietnam War." Following the campaign Hanoi returned to the negotiating table and (after some wrangling with the Saigon government) the Paris Peace Accords were signed on 27 January 1973. For the United States, the Vietnam War was over. MUCH MORE HERE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._news_media_and_the_Vietnam_War WOULD BE WORTH LOOKING INTO THE ROLE SOME IN THE AUSTRALIAN NEWS MEDIA PLAYED IN THE BUILD UP TO AND DURING BOTH THE AFGHANISTAN AND IRAQ WARS... AND IF THEIR VIEWS HAVE CHANGED... THAT INCLUDES THE ALTERNATIVE NEWS MEDIA AND NEWS FILTERING SITES. THE ROLE OF ACCREDITATION, ACCESS TO POLITICIANS AND MILITARY...WERE ANY GAGGED, DEMOTED, CENSORED, SACKED FOR THEIR DISSENTING ETC OPINIONS?... VIEWS OF THE MEDIA BARONS? IF TONY ABBOTT BECAME PM CAN WE DEPEND ON THE NEWS MEDIA TO KEEP THE BASTARD HONEST?...OR WILL MANY ACT LIKE AN INCREASINGLY CORPORATISED PRO-WAR, PRO-AMERICAN IMPERIALISM, PRO-CHRISTIAN CRUSADE PROPAGANDA MACHINE? N'

2353

20/05/2013Can someone tell me how Abbott getting his legal representation in the Ettridge case pro bono http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/national/tony-abbotts-legal-team-pro-bono-in-david-ettridge-lawsuit/story-fncyva0b-1226646308037 corresponds with the intent of pro bono http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pro_bono. It's not that Abbott has no other means of paying for the defense of a civil law case. If the solicitors want to donate time to a worth cause - I'm sure there are many that have a greater need.

nasking

20/05/2013 A LINE THAT REALLY STOOD OUT FOR ME RELATED TO THE NEWS MEDIA AND ITS ROLE IN THE VIETNAM WAR: [b]It did not, however, examine or reexamine its basic assumptions about the nature of the war it had helped to propagate.[/b] GOT ME THINKING ABOUT THE ROLE OF THE NEWS MEDIA AND THE AFGHAN AND IRAQ WARS...AND THE SO CALLED 'WAR ON TERROR'. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 AN INTERESTING LINK: http://www.crikey.com.au/topic/press-gallery/ N'

nasking

20/05/2013 DISTURBINGLY, HAS TONY ABBOTT LIED TO THE PUBLIC AGAIN?... DIDN'T HE SAY A FEW DAYS AGO TO KOSHIE ON SUNRISE THAT HE DIDN'T KNOW THE DETAILS OF THE GONSKI REFORMS?...KOSHIE TOLD HIM TO SPEAK TO NSW PREMIER O'FARRELL...AND ABBOTT GAVE THE IMPRESSION HE HADN'T HAD DETAILED DISCUSSIONS WITH THE NSW PREMIER NOR URGED HIM TO OPPOSE IT... YET BARRY O'FARRELL RECKONS TONY ABBOTT TOLD HIM HE SHOULD NOT GO WITH THE GONSKI REFORMS...IN REPLY TO A QUESTION BY PAUL KELLY ON SKY NEWS THIS WEEKEND? IS THIS MORE BULL BY ABBOTT? HE JUST CAN'T BE TRUSTED. N'

Ken

20/05/2013As I understand it the Fourth Estate was added to the list (1st estate, the clergy, 2nd, the nobility and 3rd, the commoners) because of its increasing influence, and later was seen as essential to a functioning democracy. The latter on the basis that voters need to have adequate information for democracy to work. And now we have the fifth estate. But the key issue for both the fourth and fifth estates in a democracy is "information", not "opinion". Voters need facts and explanation. It is the "explanation" part of the equation that blurs the picture because this can verge towards opinion. As many on the fifth estate have been saying, the fourth estate is now dominated by "opinion" (perhaps sometimes in the guise of "explanation")and that is not good for democracy. It is, as was discussed in the previous thread, akin to propaganda which belongs more in totalitarian regimes. The fifth estate, however, can also be dominated by opinion. For the fifth estate to be fully effective, it has to find the balance. As indicated by Lyn's links, there are many good fifth estate sites that do the proper job of information and explanation and, as these continue to grow, so will the role and influence of the fifth. People like Greg Jericho and Possum are superb examples of using statistics to cut through the (mis-) information often put out in the fourth estate and present the real situation. More strength to them.

nasking

20/05/2013 A USEFUL ARTICLE ON THE PRESENT AUSSIE PRESS GALLERY...THO, THINGS MAY HAVE EVOLVED OVER THE PAST MONTHS: Politically homeless: where will the press gallery hacks go? MATTHEW KNOTT | FEB 19, 2013 The Canberra press gallery is struggling to find space for media start-ups and smaller online players. Where will all the hacks go — and who will have to downsize? When Michelle Grattan announced her decision to leave The Age two weeks ago, the search for precious office space in Parliament House’s press gallery was on. Where would the notoriously messy newspaper icon go now she had left traditional media to join start-up website The Conversation? Despite reportedly putting in an application some time ago, The Conversation is still without a press gallery home for its Canberra staffers. Luckily for Grattan, the good samaritans at Keating Media — publisher of the Inside Canberra newsletter — agreed to take her in. Grattan’s research assistant and The Conversation’s Canberra editor are now working in there as well. The arrangement wasn’t purely altruistic: Grattan has agreed to write a regular column for Inside Canberra in exchange for a desk. Grattan said last week the new “cubby hole” arrangement means she will have to be much more “tidy and economical” with space. “This is one of the major challenges of the new job,” she told the ABC’s Jon Faine. [b]Not everyone has been as lucky as Grattan. Since leaving The Australian to write on politics for Wendy Harmer’s The Hoopla, Gabrielle Chan has had to file wherever she can — often from Aussie’s cafe. The Global Mail has also been unable to secure a permanent home, despite photographer Mike Bowers and reporter Mike Seccombe visiting the capital regularly. The issue will rear its head again when The Guardian tries to find a home in coming months for high-profile Fairfax recruits Lenore Taylor and Katharine Murphy. There’s no obvious place for them go.[/b] “I’m not aware of any vacant space at the moment,” Fairfax photographer Andrew Meares, a member of the press gallery committee, told Crikey. “We’re looking at creative options — that’s the only way we’ll be able to solve it.” [b]The press gallery occupies a long wing of Parliament House, bookmarked at either end by the infamous “Starlight Disco” common rooms, scenes of scandalous parties in more decadent times. The gallery is divided into offices, mostly one per media outlet. Fairfax, News Limited and the ABC occupy caverns, while newer media outfits have poky offices, are forced to share or have no space at all. Sky News has a notoriously small office for its staffers and Crikey has a modest home for Canberra correspondent Bernard Keane.[/b] “Sooner or later, Fairfax will have to give up one of their rooms.” Complaints of a lack of space are almost as old as the press gallery itself. Canberra veterans still recall the cramped conditions at Old Parliament House, where demountables had to be put on the roof to accommodate the fourth estate. The problem today is not so much a lack of space, as a lack of offices for the 300-odd people who work there. While the media industry is fracturing and fragmenting, the physical organisation of the press gallery continues to reflect the traditional dominance of the newspapers. It is, in the words of one gallery staffer, a “weirdly sensitive” issue in the gallery — a simultaneously collegiate and competitive place. “There’s long been a lack of space in the press gallery,” Sky News political editor and press gallery president David Speers told Crikey. “It’s becoming an increasingly difficult issue as new outlets pop up.” Meanwhile, there are empty desks in the big Fairfax and News Limited offices. Despite increased copy-sharing and a decline in its press gallery numbers, Fairfax maintains separate offices for The Canberra Times, The Age, The Sydney Morning Herald and The Australian Financial Review. Letting one of these offices go would have the added bonus of allowing Fairfax to save on rent. “Sooner or later, Fairfax will have to give up one of their rooms,” one recently departed press gallery veteran told Crikey. Any changes are unlikely to happen rapidly. The press gallery committee can propose solutions and help individual reporters, but doesn’t have the power to issue edicts. Leases are negotiated between media outlets and the Department of Parliamentary Services. Restructuring the gallery — by adding new doors and walls, for example — would be time-consuming and expensive. That’s a problem given modestly-financed start-ups such as The Hoopla don’t have enough cash to pay for office space, let alone renovations. [b]But sticking with the status quo isn’t an option.[/b] “The change in the future is there’ll be more sole operators rather than people working for big mastheads,” Meares said. “As the media landscape changes, the press gallery will have to change.” http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/02/19/politically-homeless-where-will-the-press-gallery-hacks-go/ FRANKLY, I'M SICK OF HEARING FROM POLITICIANS WITH SHOCK JOCK RADIO AND SKY NEWS BRAND MICROPHONES WAVING IN FRONT OF THEIR FACES... TALK ABOUT FREE SPRUIKING. N'

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20/05/2013Janet Thank you for your thought-provoking piece. I just wanted to pick up on the comment you mention, made by Tim Dunlop: “[i]… the mainstream journalists, who, by convention as much as anything, are given society's permission to pursue stories.”[/i] It seems to me that this is where the Fourth Estate has let us down badly. In pursuing stories, some Press Gallery journalists have used sources that have proved to be unreliable. Moreover, apparently they have been unaware that their sources are not only unreliable, but have been using them to pursue their own agenda. As an example, take Peter Hartcher, an experienced journalist, one out of the Fairfax top drawer, yet wrong again and again in his confident predictions that Julia Gillard would be ousted by the end of the year (any year), by Easter (any Easter) by the end of June (any June). Did he realize he was being conned and used by the Rudd saboteurs? Was he so obsessed with being the one to ‘break the story’ of the PM’s political demise that he believed the saboteurs’ corridor whispers, or was he so keen personally to see Kevin Rudd returned and Julia Gillard ousted, that the necessary process of fact checking and using multiple sources was overlooked, which led him to write pieces that were not based on verifiable fact and were not logically-argued. Moreover, his repeated misjudgement was accompanied by haughty arrogance, arrogance that too often characterizes writings of Fourth Estate journalists as they misuse “[i]…society’s permission to pursue stories”[/i]. He preaches from what Bushfire Bill describes as his ‘bully pulpit’, but no matter how often he is wrong, he has never offered his readers a [i]mea culpa[/i]. Michelle Grattan preaches from the same pulpit. To me, the cardinal sin of too many Fourth Estate journalists is the way they write stories that match their ideological persuasions no matter what the facts might be. While all writers, whether in the Fourth or Fifth Estates, are challenged to write objectively, whatever their personal beliefs and preferences; while all writers are challenged to avoid cherry picking the facts to suit their case, it seems to me that a plethora of Fourth Estate journalists do not meet those challenges. Day after day we seen in News Limited media and now in Fairfax media too, stories that are written to subserve a partisan political agenda, often set, as we know, by editors or proprietors in advance. This is a serious perversion of the so-called ‘freedom of the press’, which in Murdoch-speak means transmitting, without regulatory restraint, what ever ‘message’ the media outlet wishes to transmit. We have seen the grossest perversion in the context of the lead up to the next election, a perversion that in some outlets has been obvious for over two years now. Fifth Estate writers are subject to the same challenges, but in my opinion seem much less prone to the perversions we see in the Fourth Estate. It seem that much, if not most of the Fourth Estate, is pursuing a ‘remove the Gillard Government at all costs’ agenda, while the Fifth Estate is saying ‘hang on there, get your facts straight, don’t cherry-pick, argue your case rationally, don’t push you own partisan agenda no matter what the evidence tells us, be fair and balanced’. Experience tells us that this request continues to fall not just on deaf ears, but on ears that are deafened with contrary messages, messages they prefer.

nasking

20/05/2013 FROM BERNARD KEANE @ CRIKEY: [b]Needless to say, Abbott has never held a media conference that matched Gillard’s epic August press gallery media conference on the Australian Workers Union smear campaign, in which she fielded a staggering 80 questions — in addition to some on asylum seekers — or her similar November one in which she racked up 33 questions. [/b] Even without those two epic sessions, the Prime Minister on average fields more questions at Parliament House media conferences than Abbott, 13 to 11 per session, or 20 to 11 with the AWU media conferences included. [b]But as the numbers indicate, Abbott prefers his media scrutiny to be out and about across Australia, often in workplaces intended to demonstrate the impact (or what Abbott claimed would be the impact) of the carbon price. While this reflects the nature of his anti-carbon price campaign, it also means he tends to field questions from less-experienced or non-political journalists, although journalists from broadcast media and the major newspapers are able to tap into Canberra-based colleagues, editors and producers for questions on political topics of the day.[/b] [b]It also allows Abbott and his staff greater control of the agenda for those media conferences and an ability to abandon them without the sort of repercussions from the national media that occur on the occasions when he has walked out of more significant events.[/b] Abbott also avoids the ABC like the plague, gracing it just four times in a six-month period (that is based on his transcript releases, although his office didn’t release one for his car wreck of an interview with Leigh Sales on 7.30). In contrast, the Prime Minister regularly has interviews on ABC radio. Indeed, Abbott went on Andrew Bolt’s TV program (three times) almost as often as he went on the entire ABC (radio and TV). Abbott much prefers commercial television compared to the Prime Minister, especially with his now-ended regular appearances on Today. [It is, however, a myth that he prefers FM radio; neither leader spent too much time on FM, which was a favourite venue for Kevin Rudd as opposition leader. See the update below on this] There is of course no price for Abbott preferring his media scrutiny to come from non-political and less experienced commercial media journalists. Press gallery journalists may complain about his reluctance to front up, Gillard-style, to extended questioning in Parliament House but it hasn’t done anything to harm the Coalition’s polling supremacy. [b]There is, however, an opportunity if media outlets want to grill Abbott: more effectively use local journalists attending his doorstops to press him. But that would require resources, which are not in plentiful supply in the commercial media at present.[/b] http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/02/13/mythbusting-on-abbott-and-the-media-but-who-asked-the-questions/ GW BUSH AND HIS STAFF WERE FAR MORE CONTROLLING OF THE AGENDA TOO.. LOOK WHERE THAT GOT AMERICA? N'

nasking

20/05/2013 Should be: [b]GW BUSH AND HIS STAFF WERE ALSO FAR MORE CONTROLLING OF THE AGENDA DURING MEDIA CONFERENCES THAN HIS OPPONENTS... LOOK AT THE CONSEQUENCES FOR AMERICA.[/b] N'

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20/05/2013Ken I agree with you. The Fourth Estate is far too opinion driven, opinion too often driven by partisan preferences. Facts become secondary to pursing a partisan agenda, are used selectively, or are omitted altogether if inconvenient. It is a shameful perversion of what ought to be a noble pursuit – bringing reliable information to the public, separating fact from opinion, and arguing a position based on verifiable facts.

Pappinbarra Fox

20/05/2013First there was gossip, then in 1609 there came the first printed newspaper in Germany, then as the printing press spread there came a florid expansion in the number of presses printing newspapers. So there was uniform news. Then the internet arose and quickly blogs and twitter came into being and we came full circle - back to gossip. Some may say the short reign of printed newspapers never left the gossip foundation of human communication, and who is to say those people are wrong? The gossip was merely formalised for a few short decades - now the formality has been challenged. They say the victorious write the history - but we all know that history is a mythology derived from choices about what is important or interesting or available as "source" material. But for a short while when newspapers did dominate human discourse there arose a concept of ethics and specialised rules that journalists applied to themsleves. Now that we have come full circle those rules appear antiquated, quaint and not really useful to your average journo these days. And certainly no use to those who would pursue profit through news companies (cf News of the World). So, as Norm would have it, the message has been really massaged, and now a thousand hands massage the "news", without the overlord oversight of the profit chasing, and power controlling mendacious obfuscaters of those feeble few with controlling interests. More power to the thousand hands, all clapping singly but not in unison. Thank you.

Janet (j4gypsy)

20/05/2013Wow! Go out for essential shopping and TPS explodes! You really are on fire you lot :-). Glad we’ve stirred the pot. Catch-up at May 19. 2013 11:02 PM: You said: [i]‘Yes, the sites are linking well. Reading many of the comments, there seem to be many, that are happy to finds an alternate view. Yes, believe things are changing.’[/i] It’s the number of ordinary people who had begun looking for alternate media, particularly as evidenced on Twitter, that gaveth me, as they say, to think about these issues. That, and finding through the inestimable Lyn’s Links, numerous individuals and groups and ‘online ventures’ all determined to fill the gaps the fourth estate seemed to be leaving. Like you, I wonder if the ‘undecided’ showing up in polls are biding their time, and reading with us? [i]Fiona at May 19. 2013 11:03 PM:[/i] Thank you for your kind comment. Do love the black cat gravatar, and have noted you around in a site or two :-). Your comment that the site you mainly work with would do best not to be ‘lured’ by the 4th estate (which can readily be questioned on its own commitment to a code of ethics) reminded me of a couple of Twitter conversations I’d had while the Callum Davidson situation was brewing. Ben Eltham, who writes a lot for [i]New Matilda[/i], advised via tweet that he had no interest in become part of the Press Gallery. He operated from the position that his role was to analyse and write on policy and not ‘political structures’ and Wendy Bacon, one of the [i]New Matilda[/i] editors, seemed to agree with him. Meanwhile, when Tim Dunlop first floated the concept of a loose grouping of new online media and some kind of certification even, David Donovan of [i]Independent Australia[/i] (IA) via tweet suggested that he had no interest in becoming ‘part’ of such a grouping. He seemed very much on the side of those that believe they operate best to ‘disrupt’ the status quo from some kind of outside rather than inside position.

Janet (j4gypsy)

20/05/2013PatriciaWA at May 20. 2013 03:00 AM So glad you had a lovely day yesterday in memory of your brother, and thank you for the wave at a rather late hour! And then, thank you for the pome! Consummate moments: this bit a favourite: [i]They seemed to share his vision splendid Of himself rescuing from failure This ‘Triple A rated Australia!’[/i] Three cheers for irony, and satire :-).

nasking

20/05/2013 [b]David Donovan of Independent Australia (IA) via tweet suggested that he had no interest in becoming ‘part’ of such a grouping. He seemed very much on the side of those that believe they operate best to ‘disrupt’ the status quo from some kind of outside rather than inside position.[/b] JANET, THAT'S INTERESTING...I GUESS THO HE PREFERS TO STAY ON THE OUTSIDE WHILST SUPPORTING A CO-CONTRIBUTOR TO HIS SITE IN BECOMING AN 'INSIDER': The Canberra Press Gallery Committee has knocked back Independent Australia and its nominee from gaining representation. Callum Davidson explains what happened. by Callum Davidson [b]A few months back, myself and David Donovan, managing editor of Independent Australia, agreed it was high time that the vocal and growing online community of Australian political blogs deserved a voice in the Press Gallery of Parliament House.[/b] As it turns out this is a difficult task to accomplish. The concept began in the Twittersphere and I believed I had a fair claim to represent Independent Australia – and perhaps other online outlets – as a correspondent from the halls of power on The Hill. I hold an Advanced Diploma in Journalism and have been working freelance for a while now; but infinitely more importantly, I live a stone’s throw from Parliament House in Canberra. The press gallery is a bizarre and fascinating beast. Most of the Australian public still digest their political discourse from those guardians of information tethered to the cramped dorms on Capital Hill. All major mainstream news outlets, both television and print, have long had reporters stationed directly within our political elite. From Fairfax to News Limited to ABC, journalists mix with Federal politicians and their staffers, conversing with media opposition and rapaciously competing when necessary. But with the aspirational digital age and the declining fortunes of traditional media, would they let an outsider in? The short answer, at least in my case, is no. http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/business/media-2/how-the-canberra-press-gallery-shut-out-ia/ I GUESS DAVID DONOVAN HAS MOVED ON FROM THE DAYS HE CONTRIBUTED TO THE MURDOCH EMPIRE'S ONLINE SITE 'THE PUNCH': http://www.thepunch.com.au/author-bios/david-donovan/ LONG LIVE THE FIFTH ESTATE REVOLUTION! N'

nasking

20/05/2013 DAVID DONOVAN ALSO POSTED ON 'THE DRUM': David Donovan is a freelance journalist, editor of online journal Independent Australia. He was formerly the media director of the Australian Republican Movement, as well as its Queensland branch convenor. Before pursuing a journalistic career, he worked for many years as an accountant in London and Australia, including for some of the world's leading investment banks, including NatWest Global Markets, Merrill Lynch, Barclays Capital, UBS and Mizuho. David now lives in Surfers Paradise with his wife, son, cat and puppy. http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/david-donovan-39592.html NOT EXACTLY YER AVERAGE BLOKE... BUT AT LEAST HE'S IN INDEPENDENT MEDIA NOW. N'

Janet (j4gypsy)

20/05/2013Nas, you’re amazing!!! Hereby dubbed TPS historian perhaps :-). Thank you so much for all the posts with information on Press Galleries, particularly in the US. While my ‘gut’, if you like, has been so utterly horrified at the groupthink coming out of the Australian Press Gallery in this last three years, press galleries as concept seem to have had, then, a very long history in Anglo-speaking countries, at least. I was struck by the Chomsky quote used earlier about the problems with ‘embedded’ journalists because it captured the way I’ve been feeling about the PG at the moment: it’s propaganda we seem to be getting, albeit for and on behalf of one ‘side’ of an adversarial parliament. While emotionally I’m tempted by the Andrew Elder position – ‘get rid of the lot of them’- it doesn’t seem practical, or feasible. There are three ‘bodies’ that have extraordinary power here, not just one: Press Gallery; Press Club; Press Council. This, about the US Press Gallery is interesting in terms of ‘how’ belonging was decided: [i]"With the approval of House and Senate leaders, reporters drafted a set of requirements for accreditation. Press passes were issued only to those whose primary source of income was journalism, and who reported by telegraph to a daily newspaper. The rules eliminated lobbyists, but also women and minorities."[/i] As is this: [i]"By the 1990s, Internet reporters and bloggers began applying for press passes. After initial resistance, the press galleries adjusted their rules to admit those who earn their living from their journalism, and who are not underwritten by advocacy groups."[/i] So it looks like the USA has been streets ahead of Australia in getting sorted on the role and status of ‘internet reporters and bloggers’! Amusing, but universal and perhaps par for the course is the [i]“essentially adversarial, punctuated by politicians’ complaints of bias and misrepresentation”[/i] relationship that occurs between PG journalist and politician. Your next quote re US PG reporters raises issues here, too, of how ‘close’ relationships become between press and politician: [i]“Some White House correspondents have come under criticism for not challenging the people they cover more directly and thereby shirking their Fourth Estate responsibility.”[/i] We know that journalists and politicians in Canberra, eat, drink, party and sometimes sleep together (after marriage, of course! :-)). This situation alone makes your question: “[i]Are the people's interests promoted and represented[/i]?” very apt indeed. Meanwhile, while we may whinge about what we are or are not getting from the press gallery, your detail on how Nixon set about to control media during the Vietnam war is so utterly salutary. Governments can behave very badly indeed in terms of who’s mediating what information. ‘Children overboard’, anyone? Your last question on whether, if Abbott made the Lodge, our legacy media would ‘keep him honest’ is a doozy. Oddly enough I think, having got him there, they might just try – perverse as this may seem. After all, Rupert threw over John Howard and endorsed Kevin Rudd. Initially he endorsed Gough Whitlam. The media's loyalties seem very fluid ... Finally, thank you for the link to [i]Crikey’s[/i] page of status-of-the-press-related stories. Found this there: [i]"If Labor is engaged in navel-gazing, the press has embraced auto-proctology with a vengeance. Like most industries, the media is keenly interested in how it is regulated, and thinks it is “special” and “different” to every other industry. Thus, despite the fact that media reform is a tenth-order issue for voters outside the Canberra bubble, it has been virtually the only thing, along with leadership, that the media has focused on recently. Crikey (particularly given my own background on the issue), hasn’t been much different. But the press’s capacity to objectively report what it claims to be a crucial issue has been, to say the least, found wanting."[/i] http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/03/21/stench-of-failure-in-canberra-and-its-not-just-labor/ You’re almost a new media venture all by yourself Nas! Thank you again for so much input. Stay well and protect those eyes.

nasking

20/05/2013 MAKES A LOT OF SENSE TO ME...FROM NEW MATILDA: BUDGET 2013 20 May 2013 [b]What Is Abbott Really Up To? By Ian McAuley[/b] It's tempting to dismiss Abbott's speech as a confused rant, but that would be a grave mistake. The Leader of the Opposition is a skilled communicator. I would even suggest that he may be using these illogicalities and falsehoods as baits, to distract us from his true economic vision. [b]Abbott's view is deeply conservative in every sense of the term. When he says that the coming election will be a referendum on the carbon tax, he’s really referring to a choice between economic modernisation and holding on to our existing industry structure. Scrapping the carbon tax isn’t about reducing imagined cost-of-living pressures or improving international competitiveness as he claims. As a component of cost-of-living it’s trivial, and if he were serious about international competitiveness he would not say that cutting the mining tax is “the quickest way to support investment and jobs”, because it would also be the quickest way to send the currency back to high levels, thus doing far more harm to competitiveness than our modest carbon price. It’s more about halting a transition to a changed economic structure. His opposition to high-speed broadband needs to be seen in this light. The NBN is what economists call a “disruptive technology”, which can present tremendous opportunities for some entrepreneurs, while wiping out firms and industries which fail to adapt. Good for the economy, but not good for old businesses which are too sclerotic to adjust. The same holds for his opposition to the Gonski reforms. It doesn’t matter if our education standards go on slipping. We can leave it to the Chinese and northern Europeans to compete on the basis of human capital. We have mineral resources, and plenty of land to grow grains and fibre – that’s our source of prosperity. Having learned from Howard’s WorkChoices disaster, he is guarded on labour relations, simply saying “we will return the workplace relations pendulum to the sensible centre”. But he is trapped in an old culture of class struggle between “employers” and “employees”. He seems blind to an emerging economic structure where people come together not as “bosses” and “workers”, but as people bringing their talents together to create wealth and share the benefits – a change in turn prompted by disruptions to old centres of power and distribution. There is nothing unusual about his conservatism. The Liberal Party has always experienced tension between its conservative and progressive factions. It has a strong tradition of social conservatism, and social conservatism easily meshes with economic conservatism, as has happened in the USA where the Tea Party has become such a powerful force on the “right”. For most of its 68-year history the party has managed this contradiction reasonably well, but increasingly the economic conservatives – those who in 1999 gave Abbott a one vote majority – are taking over. ...The current political situation, with a Government too timid to articulate its policy clearly, and an Opposition committed to halting economic progress in its tracks, presents a strong opportunity for the Greens to retain their powerful position in the Senate. That is, provided Labor strategists do not repeat their idiocy of 2004, when they pushed Family First ahead of the Greens (thus denying the Rudd Government a supportive Senate), and provided Labor doesn’t absolutely mess up the election campaign. [/b] Christine Milne’s Budget reply got off to a good start when she said of the Budget that “it does not present a coherent vision of where the country needs to be in 10 years time or of how we face the challenges posed by an increasing global population in a rapidly warming world, the interdependence of economies and our own narrow economic base, as well as our overdependence on resource based industries and the fossil fuel intensive energy sector that drives them”. If Abbott had even a little economic nous, those are the words we might have heard from the Opposition, which would have left the Greens to focus more on specific “green” issues. [b]Unfortunately, Milne never seemed clear about whether she was attacking the Government, or the Opposition for proposing even worse policies.[/b] The Greens are in a difficult position; in my view the Democrats handled their third-party responsibilities better, possibly because they had grown as a breakaway from the Liberal Party, while the Greens have their roots outside the two-party system. But she did present a theme of economic progress, and, with a few exceptions (such as the Greens’ visceral hatred of investment in roads), it presented an economically responsible case for an expanded public sector. This contrasts with [b]Tony Abbott, whose view (repeated on ABC news), is that government should be “only as big as it needs to be to do what people can’t do for themselves”, a view which, taken to its conclusion, leaves government with no more than a few functions such as defence and handouts to the poor, leaving health care, education and infrastructure all to distorted private markets. It’s a view pushed by extreme economic libertarians, who cannot bring themselves to acknowledge that there are many things the private sector conceivably can do, but which governments do much better. Whether it’s a glib insertion by an economically naive speechwriter or a considered belief is hard to know, but it’s worth watching.[/b] What the Greens fail to acknowledge is that their vision would need a much stronger tax base. Milne rightly mentioned the high profits of mining and financial companies as potential sources of public revenue, but these are volatile – they may be suitable for once-off public investments but not as an ongoing tax base. It’s hard for any politician to mention our weak tax base, and to point out that, by comparison with other high-income countries, we collect far too little tax to provide the public services needed in a modern economy, but the Greens are in a better position to do this than any other political party. [b]Surely they would have more to gain than to lose by raising the inequities and distortions in our treatment of capital gains, superannuation, family trusts, gasoline excise and private health insurance.[/b] Perhaps, ironically, the only voices for increased public revenue are those of state premiers, most of whom are on the right of politics. They have the hard job of delivering much-needed services and public infrastructure, and, being closely connected to business, are less likely than Tony Abbott to sign on to a reactionary economic vision. http://newmatilda.com/2013/05/20/what-abbott-really WITH TONY ABBOTT AS PM YOU CAN BE SURE WE WON'T BE MOVING FORWARD...PROGRESSING... IT'LL BE THE SAME OLD CRAP WITH A CONSERVATIVE CATHOLIC FLAVOUR... WITH CUTS TO THE BONE...AN INCREASE IN GST AND BROADENING OF THE BASE TO INCLUDE FRESH FOOD AND SERVICES... AND FREE BUDGIE SMUGGLERS TO EVERY MALE WHO JOINS UP WITH HIS VERSION OF THE UK'S 'BIG SOCIETY'... A MANUAL ON 'HAVING BABIES ABBOTT STYLE' FOR THE WOMEN WHO JOIN HIS GANG OF VOLUNTEERS CLEANING UP AFTER GINA, CLIVE, TWIGGY...AND OTHER BIG DUMPERS... AND A GUARANTEE TO SUPPLY EVERY STUDENT WITH A LEATHER CLAD BIBLE MADE FROM LOCALLY BRED AND SLAUGHTERED CATTLE. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 Cheers Janet...and well said. Yer extensive comment is a gem. [b]Meanwhile, while we may whinge about what we are or are not getting from the press gallery, your detail on how Nixon set about to control media during the Vietnam war is so utterly salutary. Governments can behave very badly indeed in terms of who’s mediating what information. ‘Children overboard’, anyone?[/b] Indeed...a good reason for having diverse media ownership...a robust public broadcaster...a wide variety of reporters as part of the press corp (not to be confused with PRESS CORPSE)... plenty of voices outside of the press pool acting as reporters, news filters, opinion-makers, guardians...you name it...some in online-collectives...others solo independents...others working for news aggregators...local independent papers and mags...including online mags...uni papers/mags etc... plenty of room for all. Provided the corporate media doesn't use its political influence to bully govts into undermining free speech and restricting use of Internet in such a way that it benefits their interests. One reason I worry about a press corp of 'insiders' having privileged access to politicians...considering the dominance of a few corporations...and their increasing vertically integrated structures. Keep well Janet. Thnx for the opportunity to air my views and concerns. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 OH YEA, CORPORATE MEDIA USING THEIR BIG WALLETS AND PURSES TO BUY UP ALTERNATIVE MEDIA... OR MAKING THEM DEPENDENT ON THEIR ADVERTISING DOLLARS IN ORDER TO HAVE INFLUENCE ETC ALSO PISSES ME OFF. SAME WITH DRAINING INDEPENDENT, ALTERNATIVE NEWS MEDIA AND NEWS FILTER SITES SITES OF THEIR QUALITY CONTRIBUTORS...ONLY TO TRANSFORM THEM INTO SHADOWS OF THEIR FORMER SELVES. EVEN THE INCREASINGLY CORPORATISED PUBLIC BROADCASTERS HAVE SINNED IN THIS RESPECT. FURTHERMORE, INDEPENDENT MEDIA SOMETIMES REMINDS ME OF THE INDEPENDENT MUSIC SCENE... INCREMENTALLY IT BECAME DOMINATED BY ARTISTS, BANDS WORKING FOR BIG CORPORATES IN GUISE. NOT MUCH ALTERNATIVE ABOUT THEM...NOT DISSENTING FROM THE DOMINANT IDEOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE... OR DOING SO IN ORDER TO HELP FUNNEL MONEY BACK TO THE SAME OLD ELITE. SOME THINK 'THE PUNCH' IS ALTERNATIVE AND INDEPENDENT. THINK AGAIN. N'

KHTAGH

20/05/2013Jan A great first article, which I'm sure will not be the last, we are all privileged here to have such quality writers like yourself & AA, then to top it off we have our own tweety birds daily efforts which are so well received & appreciated by all here.

Tom of Melbourne

20/05/2013Opinion has never been more accessible, there is an outlet to express or obtain any perspective. Mainstream media has never been under greater challenge, pressure or scrutiny. Anyone with a keyboard can publish their view. So what exactly is the complaint?

Janet (j4gypsy)

20/05/20132353: May 20. 2013 08:42 AM Hi 2353. Many thanks for your comment. I agree (I think!): pollies can connect face-to-face and via new and social media easily and directly much more readily these days. If you’re on Twitter at all, Craig Emerson is a shining example of how to use Twitter to pull in your constituency. (For heaven’s sake he runs the ‘Emmo Musical Quiz’ every Sunday night and makes a donation on behalf of the winner to the winner’s chosen charity! How cool is that?, as someone a quarter of my age might say :-).) But journalists argue, and rightly, that a story the pollie can push directly to the constituency may well be propaganda because there is no-one mediating the ‘truth to power and the people' equation. The problem is, as you point out, our media has been compromised by leaning to opinion rather than to reporting that is necessarily investigative, explanatory, summative... More than by opinion pieces, the push to clear propaganda of the Murdoch press alone, the spin of the so-called ‘news’, has become so heavy as to bludgeon the reader into near insensibility. Just check out, every day for as long as you can bear, the lovely Lyn’s ‘Front Pages’ and ‘News Headlines’. Perhaps we can go too far in both directions: over-mediation by a fourth estate, or none at all?

Janet (j4gypsy)

20/05/2013Michael at May 20. 2013 09:25 AM Hi Michael, you said: [i]'Decision-maker'? I suggest not. He appears to be, but this is only within the context of the 'team-framing' argument laid out above. He's allowed to appear to be a decision maker so long as his team is in the home straight and ten lengths ahead of Labor. Those little fizzy burps from within the Coalition and without, amongst its business supporters and commercial backers, are lid-held-down-tight-till-we-cross-the-finish-line stuff, just in case the leading nag throws a shoe or snaps a tendon short of victory because his stablemates are crowding him.[/i] As ever am in awe and stricken with envy at the felicities of your lovely prose. And in agreement. You might enjoy this Moir on the decision-maker :-): http://images.smh.com.au/2013/05/19/4285601/gal-land-Moir-600x400.jpg

lyn

20/05/2013Hi Janie Thankyou to you for your wonderful, brilliant, enjoyable article. What a pleasure you are, a big diamond encased in gold. We get a double delight as well because of your replies to our readers. [quote]'Truth-O-Meter TM', will it hound to metered truth all journalist/bloggers or blogger/journalists? Should it? [/quote] If PolitiFact’s Peter Fray! were to fact check the journalists they would be writing all day and all night, there would be a bonfire of pants on fire. I don’t know about anyone else but I already have doubts about Politifact . I hope I’m wrong but the last report on Julia Gillard I didn’t appreciate eg: Zac Spitzer MORE CHERRY PICKING! PolitiFact Australia | Did Gillard really break her 'no carbon tax' promise? http://www.politifact.com.au/truth-o-meter/statements/2013/may/19/tony-abbott/did-gillard-break-her-no-carbon-tax-promise/ … via [quote]PolitiFact.com From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [/quote]Conservative bias and liberal bias have been alleged, and criticisms have been made of attempts to fact-check statements that cannot be truly "fact-checked". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PolitiFact.com Abbott with yet another problem: [quote]Tony Abbott's chief of staff Peta Credlin caught drink driving [/quote] TONY Abbott has called his chief of staff Peta Credlin "outstanding" after she was caught drink driving on the night of the Opposition Leader's budget reply speech. http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/national/tony-abbotts-chief-of-staff-peta-credlin-caught-drink-driving/story-fni0xqrc-1226646494276 :):):):)

nasking

20/05/2013 We should also discuss the use of the public broadcaster as a cash cow by the likes of Alan Kohler, Andrew Denton and others. And why 'Friends of the ABC' and other interest groups and individuals have not taken Mark Scott and his team to court over using our valuable taxpayer's dollars to make this lot even richer who have outside and conflicting interests? Ben Elthem wrote a useful post back in 2012...obviously ignored by Scott and co: [b]Kohler's untenable conflict of interest[/b] http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4084362.html NOT ON. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 ROFL... CHRISTOPHER PYNE ON SKY NEWS AGENDA PLAYING RUBBERY FIGURES WHEN IT COMES TO EDUCATION...HE WASN'T EVEN CERTAIN OF SOME FIGURES...REMINDED ME OF JOYCE AS SHADOW FINANCE MINISTER. PYNE RECKONS THE COALITION'S POLICY IS FAR "MORE GENEROUS" THAN THE GOVERNMENTS. THAT 'NATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS' MONEY NOW BEING SHIFTED TO OTHER EDUCATION FUNDING HE GETS ALL UP IN ARMS ABOUT DIDN'T EXIST UNDER THE HOWARD GOVT... BUT THE SCHOOLS DID GET A VALUES POSTER, FLAG POLES AND BOOKS WITH THE STAMP OF APPROVAL BY THE RODENT'S GOVT. WHOOPEE!!! PYNE REALLY IS NOT ON TOP OF HIS JOB... UNLESS OF COURSE ABBOTT JUST WANTED SOMEONE LIKE HIMSELF TO RUN EDUCATION...SCROOGISH UNLESS IT COMES TO TOP PRIVATE...UNION HATER, BASHER...BIGOTED...CULTURE WARRIOR...TIN EAR. HOW MOTIVATING FOR EDUCATORS. SURE, THE GOVT TO IS PLAYING GAMES WITH THE FUNDING FIGURES A BIT...BUT THEY SURE AS HECK PUT A DAMN SITE MORE FUNDING AND FOCUS INTO DISADVANTAGED SCHOOLS THAN THE RODENT TEAM. THE WABBOT AND THE POODLE WON'T BE ANY BETTER. THEY'RE FULL OF IT. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 Should be: THE GOVT IS ALSO PLAYING GAMES WITH THE FUNDING FIGURES

nasking

20/05/2013 Lyn, nothing like conservative values and standards eh?: [b]TONY Abbott has called his chief of staff Peta Credlin "outstanding" after she was caught drink driving on the night of the Opposition Leader's budget reply speech. [/b] If I had to work with that lying wanker Abbott I'd drink too...but I doubt I'd drink and drive...surprised he didn't tell tipsy Peta to get ON YER BIKE!!! N'

nasking

20/05/2013 IF THIS ALLEGATION IS RIGHT THEN IT LOOKS MEDIA WARISH...AMONGST OTHER THINGS: A senior News Limited executive offered to pay up to $100,000 in legal fees to a Geelong real estate agent embroiled in a legal brawl with a part-Fairfax-owned rival. A “private and confidential” email sent by News’ national real estate czar Tom Panos to Hayeswinckle managing director Danny Hayes in March, obtained by Crikey, states that under the “strictly confidential” deal News would pay 50% of his legal fees to defend himself against Metro Media Publishing, which is half owned by Fairfax. Metro Media is suing Hayeswinckle and related entity Team 3126 in the Victorian County Court for at least $1.4 million in contract breaches and damages, alleging that it reneged on the terms of an advertising agreement with the MMP-owned Weekly Review Greater Geelong and moved its ads to News’ Geelong Advertiser instead. Panos writes that “to assist you in your defence of the legal action brought against you by MMP we are prepared to reimburse you 50% of the legal fees that you incur … up to a total aggregate payment by us under this arrangement of $100,000”. Hayes replies that he “will talk about payment tomorrow”. It is not known whether any cash changed hands. http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/05/20/news-limited-exec-offers-up-to-100k-in-secret-legal-payment/ NEWS LTD PEOPLE SURE GET AROUND...DOING MORE THAN JUST NEWS INVESTIGATION AND REPORTING. TALONS IN SO MANY SMELLY PIES. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 CORPORATE MEDIACWARS ANYONE? GET YER PEANUT PRESS GALLERY-LIKE SEAT NOW...THE POPCORN IS NOT ON RUPERT. HE'S TOO BUSY HANGING OUT WITH THE PRESS CORPSES MAKING FACES AT THE GOVERNMENT FROM THE PRIVILEGE GALLERY. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 Should be: CORPORATE MEDIA WARS ANYONE? The iPad has gremlins.

42 long

20/05/2013If Peta Credlin watched the pathetic pantomime and realised how dreadful it was I could understand her having a NEED to be able to cope. Tony had better get used to apologising if the Slipper/ Ashby/ Brough thing goes where it should. He tells us how wonderful they all are, including many who aren't wonderful at all. ( Corey Barnardi) Should we believe ONE word the abbott says. I take one look at his front bench that he picked and wonder where his judgement lies. The more time passes the more there is to apologise for. Hunt this morning with Fran Kelly sounded like a squeaky little kid who wanted permission to have a pee. Their Climate change policy is a shambles They are playing with the market picking winners while the Labor types have a market based approach. saying the drop in power used was due to a power station being out of service. Did anyone notice the blackouts?NO There weren't any. When one power station is out the other ones generate the amount needed, at maybe extra cost. You DOPE HUNT!! There are plenty of examples of this role reversal. Tony has to do the opposite of Gillard. It's impossible for this "Mental" character, when it comes to women having a win, to agree with them. No balanced view. I still say the PPL of the abbott is NOT a goer but this is his great claim to FAME so how does he let it go?. They have a bit of thinking to do now. The time for just saying NO NO is over . What a waste of their salaries and oxygen they have been since the election. The election by the people of Australia of all the people in the parliament ( as it is legally) " The Longest Dummy Spit in History" (albo) .

Ken

20/05/2013Reading Pappinbarra Fox reminded me that there was something like the fifth estate back in the 1700s and 1800s - the pamphleteers. The modern blog is akin to the work of those early pamphleteers, but just making use of current technology instead of a printing press.

Sir Ian Crisp

20/05/2013[quote][b]Can someone tell me how Abbott getting his legal representation in the Ettridge case pro bono www.couriermail.com.au/.../story-fncyva0b-1226646308037 corresponds with the intent of pro bono http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pro_bono. It's not that Abbott has no other means of paying for the defense of a civil law case. If the solicitors want to donate time to a worth cause - I'm sure there are many that have a greater need. 2353 [/b][/quote] I think it's called the "Carmen Lawrence Model". [quote][b] Appropriation (Dr Carmen Lawrence's Legal Costs) Bill 1999-2000 First Reading 1998-1999-2000 The Parliament of the Commonwealth of Australia HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Presented and read a first time Appropriation (Dr Carmen Lawrence's Legal Costs) Bill 1999-2000 No. , 2000 (Finance and Administration) A Bill for an Act to appropriate money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund to meet the Commonwealth's liability relating to legal costs of Dr Carmen Lawrence in connection with the Marks Royal Commission, and for related purposes http://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/C2004B00674 [/b][/quote] Next question please...

Ken

20/05/2013Sir Ian Cr... Would be useful if you read the details before you post. [quote]The Consolidated Revenue Fund is appropriated for the purpose of meeting the Commonwealth’s liability under orders made on 25 February 2000 by the Federal Court of Australia in the case of Vass & Ors v The Commonwealth of Australia, and for the purpose of meeting any associated liability of the Commonwealth to pay interest under section 52 of the Federal Court of Australia Act 1976.[/quote] A liability against The Commonwealth based on legal opinion. as the captcha says "I rest my case" cheers

nasking

20/05/2013 My father-in-law who lives in Beaudesert detests Abbott...has never trusted him...doesn't like the look of him...thinks he looks [b]SHIFTY[/b]...usually votes National Party...but he HATES THE GST... so now he hates Abbott even more... and he doesn't like the idea of his daughter in education...and son in disability services...being hurt as the COALITION govts possibly CUT TO THE BONE. Feel the WINDS OF CHANGE...ARROGANT ABBOTT ABOUT TO BE TOPPLED OFF HIS PERCH. N'

nasking

20/05/2013 [b]Hunt this morning with Fran Kelly sounded like a squeaky little kid who wanted permission to have a pee. Their Climate change policy is a shambles [/b] 42 long, LOL...HUNT REALLY IS LOOKING AND SOUNDING DESPERATE... AND THAT DIRECT ACTION PLAN IS A MISHMASH OF IDEAS THAT MIGHT WORK IF YOU LIVED IN A PLACE CALLED LALA LAND. SHAMBLES INDEED. I RECKON THE MORE SCRUTINY IT GETS THE MORE THE VOTERS WILL BE SHAKING THEIR HEADS AND SAYING IN DISGUST: NOT [b]ANOTHER BLOODY USELESS ABBOTT POLICY!!![/b] N'

Fiona

20/05/2013Ken, [quote]Reading Pappinbarra Fox reminded me that there was something like the fifth estate back in the 1700s and 1800s - the pamphleteers. The modern blog is akin to the work of those early pamphleteers, but just making use of current technology instead of a printing press. [/quote] A point I made at a seminar at Sydney Uni in October 2008 ... Fiona

Catching up

20/05/2013All we hear from Pyne, is the cost of Gonski, and how much Labor will spend. Yes, this is important. Gonski means much more than that. It is also about how and where the money will be spent. Gonski moves away from the present model, where states are responsible for their schools. The Feds for private schools. Gonski has looked at all aspects of education, across the land. It has come up with a model, that focus on the child, not the school. It also focuses on the individual need of the child. This is a massive change. Maybe there is not enough money to fully find what Gonskl envisage, but it is enough to establish it. If we let Gonski go, education will remain funded by the broken funding model we have now. For the future of the country, and the need to invest in human capital, Abbott must not be allowed to win. Gonski is just to important to let die. O'Farrell knows this. I believe that other parties are looking for a way to go with G'Farrell. Labor has been working on this since they came into power. There has been much work done. There has been a trial in many schools, of ow it will work. It is not a brain fart that the PM has just had. There is a great white wash occurring on Ray Hadley at the moment on ABC 1

nasking

20/05/2013 So, Tony Abbott and Joe Hockey want to cut to the bone...and they hope to put the GST up at some point on all of us...whilst cutting the school kids' bonus...and Super benefits for low paid workers... whilst getting rid of the mining tax for Gina and Twiggy...and giving them a cut in company tax... How FAIR is that when we read this?: [b]AUSTRALIA'S richest woman Gina Rinehart and fellow billionaire Andrew Forrest shared in more than $100,000 worth of taxpayer-funded handouts in their companies under Royalties for Regions last financial year. While the WA Government announced last week it was increasing household fees to manage "the state's finances in difficult times", in 2011-12 it handed $61,829 for an "innovative drilling" program, to Mr Forrest's Fortescue Metals Group, which is worth about $10.74 billion. And though the Government has been demanding "efficiency" cuts from its agencies for the past four years, it gave a further $38,551 from the same program to Hancock Prospecting, whose boss, Mrs Rinehart, was last year reported as earning about $600 a second. Since 2009, the drilling program, which is part of the royalties' Exploration Incentive Scheme, has paid more than $9.2 million to resource companies, some worth several hundred million dollars. The Government says the scheme aims "to encourage exploration in WA for the long-term sustainability of the state's resources sector". But nurses and WA Labor say the royalties public cash should be used to improve country hospitals, schools and policing, instead of being blown on wealthy miners.[/b] http://www.perthnow.com.au/business/royalties-for-rich-with-gina-rinehart-and-andrew-forrest-benefitting-from-taxpayer-funded-handouts/story-fnhohdoh-1226645997350 ENUFF IS ENUFF!!! ABBOTT WANTS TO MAKE US PAY... WHILST HE AND HIS STATE MATES PROVIDE WELFARE FOR MEGA-RICH GINA AND TWIGGY... NOT ON!!! N'

Kevin Rennie

20/05/2013Good stuff. Too many of the traditional gatekeepers are fixated on the medium rather than the messenger, on the journal rather than the journalist. I write (photograph, video etc) therefore I am... Have Sony, Will Travel. Enough navel gazing. I'm only interested in this debate when access is denied to 'citizen' journalists because people are trying to defend their traditional privileges.

TalkTurkey

20/05/2013Some of my tweets and retweets today (I actually tweet a good many more but they are not self-explanatory, many are replies to others' tweets.) TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 3m @jjp666 Drunken Abbortt sleeps thru Parlt debates His Policy RuGu makes drunken threats to indigenous man His COS on drunk driving charge! TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 1h @peartonjohnson Ditto. I'm not going to watch shit like Annabel Crabb's giggly presentation of a Fascist pig. @Peter_Fitz TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 4h @anncherie49 @nkweggs @TonyAbbottMHR At .075% BloodAlcohol everyone is too affected to drive & not blotto enough not to know it. SHE KNEW! @Bukumbooee @Edzones @TonyAbbottMHR That's his 2 top advisers have fuacked up within a month! Pyne too, heh heh, bet BO'F's impressed, Not! Deb ‏@harrypusspuss 5h Stop the boats, stop #gonski, stop clean energy initiatives, stop NBN, stop the progress, raise GST, raise taxes, pay polluters #myliberal TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey "Peta Credlin is an outstanding drunk driver..." Tony Abborrrrrrrrrtt Larvey ‏@Bukumbooee 5h @ABCNews24 @abcnews @QandA @ABC Please ask Peta Credlin's boss Tony Abbott whether she was driving a publically owned or financed vehicle. Retweeted by TalkTurkey TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey @AshGhebranious How many a time and oft Have I wished Labor interviewees Would bite back DON'T INTERRUPT YOU RUDE ****! TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 5h @BernardKeane @rupertmurdoch How can they look themselves in the mirror! @JaneCaro @QPublicServant How wd he know?He NEVER asks questions re Educn his shadow portfolio & he wouldn't be seen dead in a State School! @NannaHannah @SandraSearle @rupertmurdoch is a rabid ZiONiST! 8h @chrismurphys And wasn't Abbortt's "policy guru", the 1 that talks of slashing Aboriginal throats,"outstanding" likewise? Both do stand out! TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 9h @geeksrulz Only a little bit over? As in over kids drunks just run over? I'm over drunk drivers, inexcusable. The whole society's to blame. Just Another Tony ‏@watsongirlsdad 9h The press gallery always run out of questions before the PM runs out of answers. Tony Abbott always runs out of ..actually just runs out. Retweeted by TalkTurkey TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 9h @defenseAU That's precisely the sort of % where you KNOW you're too pissed to drive! Credlin is a dangerous criminal now imo.DELIBERATE DUI! TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 9h @Thefinnigans He's a pisspot is what he means. Seems like so's his nose-ring-puller Credlin, worse she drives when drunk. What % reading? TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 9h @suzlette333 @theage This man will be a NULL Prime Minister. TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 9h @mrumens I have been predicting lost links with PM for months now, hardly ever been wrong. It's beyond mischievous, it's corrupt. CORRUPT TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 11h @rupertmurdoch Tweet more often you old turd Each time you do you're more absurd I will give you The Hot Word: Twitter's giving u the bird! TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 11h @Malcolm4Leader @TurnbullMalcolm White man speak with forked tongue. TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey *J*U*L*I*A*s got all our ducks in a row! Bang! NBN,NDIS,GO GO GO! Bang! Price on Carbon, Bang MRRT! You Beauty *J*U*L*I*A* Girl U'll Do Me! TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey @CanberraMemes @davidbewart This 4 months post-budget time *J*U*L*I*A* & Team have always planned to be the time to go for the jugular. YAY! TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 12h New lead~article~writer on TPS! Jan Mahyuddin @j4gypsy http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/post/2013/05/19/Whos-been-playing-in-MY-estate-Yet-more-ferment-in-the-fourth-and-fifth.aspx#comment … Comrades of the Fighting 5th please read, you'll like it! mango ‏@ByronBayMango 12h Gillard Picks Up A Million Votes: Nielsen: http://www.ellistabletalk.com/2013/05/19/gillard-picks-up-a-million-votes-nielsen/ … Leanne Donaldson ‏@BundyFlyGirl 13h Tony Abbott's legal team pro-bono in David Ettridge lawsuit http://news.com.au/national-news/tony-abbotts-legal-team-pro-bono-in-david-ettridge-lawsuit/story-fncynjr2-1226646308037 … Retweeted by TalkTurkey Mark ‏@markjs1 14h Let's be VERY clear ...a vote for Abbott & his thugs is a vote to INCREASE GST to 15%... on EVERYTHING!! #auspol Retweeted by TalkTurkey TalkTurkey ‏@TalkyTurkey 13h @davrosz Labor Lawyers, David Ettridge needs pro bono support for his challenge. He is a fair & reasonable bloke imo, not a rabid loony. Buttercup. ‏@_CaptnShogun 15h I think, therefore I am an atheist. #atheist Retweeted by TalkTurkey Political Tragic ‏@politicaltragic 14h @ABC_NewsRadio @barryofarrell Prissy would say that wouldn't he? Not 1 quest 2 Minister on Educ in 3years,thats how much he cares abt kids

nasking

20/05/2013 STEPHEN CONROY HAS TO GO...HE'S BEEN SLOW ROLLING OUT THE NBN...AGREED TO PAY TELSTRA FAR TOO MUCH MONEY...CAME UP WITH A GROTESQUE NET FILTERING SYSTEM..HAS FAILED TO PROTECT CHILDREN FROM GAMBLERS...SPENT TIME AT THEIR EXPENSE WITH MEDIA BARONS GIVING THEM MILLIONS OF UNNECESSARY TAXPAYER DOLLARS...DELIBERATELY SABOTAGED THE MEDIA REFORM BILL...HAS COST THIS COUNTRY SOOO MUCH MONEY...HE'S IN THE CORPORATE AND MEGA-RICH POCKETS: http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2013/05/16/3760902.htm SICKENING. CONROY OUT!!! NOW AND THE GOVT NEEDS TO SUPPORT RICHARD NATALE'S BILL AND SO ON SICK OF THIS GOVT BROWN-NOSING THE GAMBLING INDUSTRY AT CHILDREN AND FAMILY'S EXPENSE. N'

jane

20/05/2013Janet, a great post with plenty of food for thought. Lyn @3.52pm, I have the same misgivings as you wrt Politifacts. Reading your link, I realised that they had obviously not researched the alleged "carbon tax" lie meme. I would have thought that they would have checked what PMJG had actually said and based their rating on the facts. However, they seem to have just accepted the Liars version of events, which makes me think their ratings are unreliable. And quelle surprisement. Liealot has defended Credlin for drink driving. I have just finished reading all your wonderful links and will tackle comments tomorrow. I see Nas' is still on fire and can't wait to read his comments.

TalkTurkey

21/05/2013Patricia You nailed the most poignant moment in last week's sitting, the disgraceful abuse of Parliament as if it were a place of public entertainment. "His oratory had been inspired! Yes, the Gallery audience was hired." This is the behaviour Abborrrtt is attempting to instil and perpetuate in Australian politics. But never fear, we will stop him. Better still, we are in the process of doing so. So glad Tacker turned up! He's a naughty little Dog, this is not the first time he's strayed! :) And Cuppa! I felt every word. Brilliant. I too celebrate the power and freedom of the Fighting 5th Estate. Together we will shame and diminish the Flailing 4th, and if it continues to exist we will see to it that it changes for the very much better. We will. Or we will usurp it completely in the name of the People and of honesty. And now ... Jan Mahyuddin @j4gypsy ! What a scholarly, fresh, in-depth essay you have gifted us! We always knew you were clever but Gee you've opened our eyes. I'm actually a bit lost for words. But very proud of you. Fortunately Ad astra and several others have said what needed to be said. Just don't think you're gonna get away with just the one! Sincerely, it's a splendid and empowering article, thank you so much.

TalkTurkey

21/05/2013Lyn Re Politifact Me too, from the word Go. The very first verdict, as I remember it. Politifact seems to me as if it has its own agenda, not related to truth.

lyn

21/05/2013Today’s Links Raising the GST by @LarvatusProdeo the idea that Australia faces a “budget emergency” is bullshit, we do have some decisions to make. Australia’s governments do not raise enough tax revenue to pay for the services we want http://larvatusprodeo.net/archives/2013/05/raising-the-gst/ What Is Abbott Really Up To? By @newmatilda emotive language disconnected from reality (“skyrocketing debt”, “a spiral, deeper and deeper into debt”, “budget emergency”), sophistry (the implied need for “cost of living relief”), unsubstantiated generalisations (“bad government”) and simple fallacies, including a confusion of inflation with wealth http://newmatilda.com/2013/05/20/what-abbott-really Gillard’s budget boost by @CoffsOutlook the government will take heart from what it hopes is a return to the slow but steady poll recovery achieved in the second half of 2012 when Mr Abbott’s anti-carbon tax scare campaign collapsed. http://coffsoutlook.com/16497/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=16497 Whose views skew the news? Media chiefs ready to vote out Labor, while reporters lean left by @ConversationEDU This is further evidence to support the argument that Australian journalists’ worldviews and cultural backgrounds are still not representative of the general population. http://theconversation.com/whose-views-skew-the-news-media-chiefs-ready-to-vote-out-labor-while-reporters-lean-left-13995 Tony’s double carbon duplication redundancy by @macro_business Where is the sense in this? The carbon price will already fall to $10-$15 one year later when it joins the EU scheme. In the mean time, we’re going to go through this incredibly wasteful, markets destabilising, socially divisive exercise to rid the nation of a price that has been endorsed by the economic titans of both http://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2013/05/tonys-double-carbon-duplication-redundancy/ Debt that goes bump in the night by @TheKouk Australia’s government finances are among the strongest in the world. The return to surplus is prudent and based on sound assumptions. Commentary to the contrary is based on fear, opinion and bias and not fact. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/5/20/economy/debt-goes-bump-night This budget less dishonest than last year's by @1RossGittins this year the vociferous criticism of Treasury's forecasts and assumptions has come from the Opposition (they would say that), partisan economists and shock jocks who wouldn't know the difference between a forecast and a projection if it bit them on the backside. http://www.rossgittins.com/2013/05/this-budget-less-dishonest-than-last.html Every day it's a getting closer, more GST by @1petermartin Tony Abbott has said he will allow consideration of the GST in the tax review he will commission should he win the next election, but that any changes would be put to the people first at a subsequent election. http://www.petermartin.com.au/2013/05/every-day-its-getting-closer-more-gst.html Fears births will be brought forward by @1petermartin Treasurer Wayne Swan is being urged to smooth the ''sudden death'' end of the baby bonus, due to fall from $5000 to $500. http://www.bordermail.com.au/story/1512262/fears-births-will-be-brought-forward/?cs=7 Response to the reactions to the Budget reply by @OnLineOpinion Observers familiar with Australia's economy would have noticed in the presentation several stated or implied falsehoods and other curious claims. And might have expected some criticism from the commentariat.Well, not only was media reaction completely devoid of fulmination against the fibs, http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=15025 Sudden outbreak of responsibility from both parties on budget by Bernard Keane Abbott, while dancing around the issue, has declined to exclude the GST from his promised tax review. Of course, without the GST, such a review is entirely unnecessary while the Henry review sits unloved on Treasury bookshelves. Fixing the damage done to the GST by ex-Democrat head Meg Lees http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/05/20/sudden-outbreak-of-responsibility-from-both-parties-on-budget/ News Limited Seeks Excess Access To Your Social Media Accounts by @mwyres When signing up using your Twitter account, they want access to “read tweets from your timeline”, “see who you follow, and follow new people“, “update your profile“, and “post tweets for you“. http://michaelwyres.com/2013/05/news-limited-seeks-excess-access-to-your-social-media-accounts/ Whither the progressive voter? by @AusVotes2013 Thus, if you consider yourself a ‘progressive’ voter, the ultimate goal needs to be twofold; limiting the effectiveness of an Abbott government by voting Green in the senate, and sending a clear signal to the ALP that there is nothing to gain in drifting towards inhumane populism on asylum seekers. http://ausvotes2013.com/2013/05/20/whither-the-progressive-voter/ Big business beseiged Fairfax is un-Manning the barricades by @independentaus Most print financial media suffer from the same malaise; ideology and the kowtowing to favoured groups will always trump analysis and honesty. The genre is constitutionally dry. Witness incumbents of the economics editor role at the Fin: Michael Stutchbury in his natural habitat, author of the ‘seminal’ 1992 Gain from the pain http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/business/media-2/big-business-beseiged-fairfax-is-un-manning-the-barricades/ Hockey fumbles the ball – again – on Coalition economic policy by @crazyjane13 Asked to justify why the Coalition insisted on using the phrase ‘budget emergency’, Hockey at first flatly denied ever doing so (even though Opposition Leader Tony Abbott is still using it as of this morning), then fell back on familiar talking points. ' http://consciencevote.com.au/2013/05/20/hockey-fumbles-the-ball-again-on-coalition-economic-policy/ "a future akin to Europe's present"?, by Gary Sauer-Thompson Moir's cartoon is pretty accurate by you would guess that from business and political journalism. As we know the media’s commercial interest masquerading as news is not new and that a lot of the commentary is PR-driven churnalism. http://www.sauer-thompson.com/archives/opinion/2013/05/a-future-akin-t.php An Open Letter to the Moderators ABC Online by @FairMediaAllian Given the efforts of so many in the media to talk down Swan and talk up Abbott, this result looks to be pretty good for Labor.And then on Monday, the Morgan Poll:‘Last weekend’s multi-mode weekly Morgan Poll http://fairmediaalliance.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/an-open-letter-to-the-moderators-abc-online/ Abbott revisits superannuation at your expense by @no_filter_Yamba Australian Leader of the Opposition Tony Abbott in his Budget Reply Speech of 16 May 2013 states he will not raise the compulsory superannuation contribution paid to Australian workers to 12 per cent: http://northcoastvoices.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/abbott-revisits-superannuation-at-your.html Rupert reveals his hand by @MigloMT The answer is simple: he wants to make money out of us. And who can provide that? Tony Abbott. And how can he provide that? By ripping up the NBN. http://theaimn.com/2013/05/20/rupert-reveals-his-hand/ The art of journalism: satisfying beginners and expert readers by @BaxterSally What makes a journalist? A lot of people – inside and outside the profession – are asking that question. If you think it takes a genius, think again. Good journalists have a representative of their audience in mind who informs every step of their work. http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/the-art-of-journalism-satisfying-beginners-and-expert-readers/ The Power Index: who’ll really decide the federal election? by @andrewjcrook The wonks, the flacks, the hacks and the headkickers — here are the people who are doing their damnedest to get Julia Gillard or Tony Abbott into the Lodge. The Power Index names the string-pullers. http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/05/20/the-power-index-wholl-really-decide-the-federal-election/ Baby Can I Hold You by @madwixxy To make grandiose public statements as Pyne did without knowing the facts shows a willingness to make things up as they go along, whether it’s right or wrong. http://wixxyleaks.com/2013/05/20/baby-can-i-hold-you/ Abbott budget reply a series of stumbles by Michael Gillies Smith Abbott cannot guarantee a fall in power prices in a carbon tax-free electricity market.The promise may haunt him from now until the election and, should he win the September election, beyond. http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4700796.html Tony Abbott jumps on Labor's budget catch 22.2 by Mungo MacCallum Abbott's big promise was that he would do nothing substantial about anything http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4700314.html Whose views shape the news? by @btckr I think it is the editors (and the owners and managers) who are leading public opinion and the broader electorate is being led by the nose. The opinion polls (one of which, Newspoll, is half-owned by News Limited) are reflecting what the editors think, not what the “broader electorate” really thinks http://truthinmediaresourcecentre.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/whose-views-shape-the-news/ Turnbull rejects Labor’s NBN subsidy claims by @renailemay Shadow Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull has strongly denied claims by Labor MPs that the Coalition’s rival National Broadband Network policy would see those in rural areas pay more to access NBN infrastructure, stating that the Coalition would maintain the so-called “cross-subsidy”. http://delimiter.com.au/2013/05/20/turnbull-rejects-labors-nbn-subsidy-claims/ Tony Abbott; Paedophiles, Murderers and War Criminals by @archiearchive DRUNK PEOPLE WHO DRIVE EVENTUALLY KILL PEOPLE! Yet Tony Abbott is full of praise for his dangerously drunken chief of staff. http://archiearchive.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/tony-abbott-paedophiles-murderers-and-war-criminals/ Mr Rabbit Takes Centre Stage, But Will He Regret It? by Patriciawa As I read Bushfire Bill’s article about Abbott’s fear, I agreed that Abbott was indeed afraid to face Prime Minister Gillard without a prepared speech and an audience also prepared to applaud on cue. http://cafewhispers.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/mr-rabbit-takes-centre-stage-but-will-he-regret-it-2/ Today’s Front Pages Australian Newspaper Front Pages for 21 May 2013 http://www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm News headlines http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

TalkTurkey

21/05/2013Oklahoma! Hugh Jackman http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrDVzbeDzRk The Windy City Doris Day Can't stand her myself! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MnUrhptPSo

TalkTurkey

21/05/2013Lynnie! THIRTY Links! Mon Dieu! No newspaper in the WORLD has so much daily news and well-written thoughtful views as we do thanks to you!

Ad astra

21/05/2013LYN'S DAILY LINKS updated: http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/page/LYNS-DAILY-LINKS.aspx

Janet (jan@j4gypsy)

21/05/2013Ken at May 20. 2013 10:47 AM and Ad Astra at May 20. 2013 11:01 AM: Hi Ken and Ad, Thank you both for your insightful comments yesterday. You seem both to be treading the same territory on the problem of the fourth estate shifting focus from facts and information to ‘opinion’, an issue also brought up by 2353 and Nas. Ken said: [i]‘It is the "explanation" part of the equation that blurs the picture because this can verge towards opinion.’[/i] But also: [i]‘The fifth estate, however, can also be dominated by opinion. For the fifth estate to be fully effective, it has to find the balance.’[/i] Ad said: [i]‘To me, the cardinal sin of too many Fourth Estate journalists is the way they write stories that match their ideological persuasions no matter what the facts might be ...’ Fifth Estate writers are subject to the same challenges, but in my opinion seem much less prone to the perversions we see in the Fourth Estate.’[/i] TPS has long been picking up on the problems with the fourth estate. I was interested in the way you both suggest how the fifth is facing similar challenges to the fourth. It is ironical that the charges the fourth levels at the fifth -- that it consists only of opinion, if not rant, is partisan and isn’t journalism -- is precisely what the fifth is shouting back at the fourth (and yes sometimes it shouts). I’m not sure if the fifth is less prone to perversion – but I do think the fourth still has more power to influence at this stage, although the power of the fifth grows. Or is it that the fifth is ’another country’ and we do power differently here? The testiness and the ‘testing’ between the estates is strong. Witness this Twitter exchange on 19 May between Stephanie Pilbrick (researcher, writer) and David Donovan of [i]Independent Australia[/i] which was partly retweeted last Sunday. (By the way Nas, thank you for the extra information on David – hadn’t realised he’d written for several branches of the fourth: [i]The Drum[/i] and [i]The Punch[/i]): [i]IndependentAustralia ‏@independentaus19 May[/i] @Steph_Philbrick @dufussy IA supports an independent Australia (sovereignty), Independents in politics and independent thought. [i]Stephanie Philbrick ‏@Steph_Philbrick19 May[/i] .@independentaus To clarify, “Independents in politics”=independent MPs. “independence in politics”=free thought. Are you sure? @dufussy [i]IndependentAustralia ‏@independentaus19 May[/i] @Steph_Philbrick @dufussy We promote Independent (not party) politics http://www.independentaustralia.net/resource-for-independents … and independent (not groupthink) thought. [i]Stephanie Philbrick ‏@Steph_Philbrick19 May[/i] @independentaus And if you are anti- major political parties, but without bias, I would expect coverage of ALL parties. You don’t. @dufussy [i]IndependentAustralia ‏@independentaus19 May[/i] @Steph_Philbrick @dufussy We are a progressive publication. We support progressive policies and ideas. Read: http://www.independentaustralia.net/about/ [i]Stephanie Philbrick ‏@Steph_Philbrick19 May[/i] @independentaus You can keep pointing to position statements, but to claim IA presents balanced/independent reportage is false. @dufussy [i]IndependentAustralia ‏@independentaus19 May[/i] @dufussy @Steph_Philbrick We are an unashamedly progressive publication and we support Independents in politics. http://www.independentaustralia.net/about/ [i]Stephanie Philbrick ‏@Steph_Philbrick19 May[/i] @independentaus My point is that you present yourself as independent from bias, yet an anti-party political agenda is far from that @dufussy [i]Stephanie Philbrick ‏@Steph_Philbrick19 May[/i] @independentaus The stories IA invests this kind of time and energy in are very much cherry-picked, so yes, I question its true independence

denese

21/05/2013testing 123 dear add astra, are u able to stop the notify button please accidently ticked I dear my emails box if full of your wonderful posters are things turning I thought the word gst would wake a few people up,, I did read he has backed away from that now, so they did before remember the words never ever the gst well we got one, so whats that only PPL left and tree planting of course the real policies is what he takes and doesn't all very mean spirited but the one that no pension will be indexed must be the most unchristian one and from one who says he is Christian,,, really

42 long

21/05/2013The upsurge of interest in modifying the GST is orchestrated by the predictable sections who don't really like taxes at all. The idea that all the states (ALL of them not the majority) hAD to agree to having it changed, was SOLD to us to ensure that the arrangement that got through was extremely unlikely to be tampered with) This included a rate of 10% and exclusions books education basic food etc. EVERY HONEST person knows this hits the low income person the MOST. Those who HAVE to use every cent of their income to just get by pay it on every dollar. It's inflationary too. also the last time it was compensated for at the introduction. The impost carries on forever and the taxes it was supposed to abolish still remain. The introduction of the tax last time nearly caused the defeat of Howard's government and the work of the democrats in aiding it's introduction by 'softening ' the effect on the vulnerable eventually broke the democrats apart and they are no more. I feel (and hope) that the resistance to this will be at least as great as it was last time although some voters will have no memory of the last occasion. The amount of paperwork is considerable and broadening it out could mean everything is taxed each time it changes hands. there will be a drift to a cash economy and then enforcement will have to be taken to reduce that. Brave New World. "we know where you are and every cent you spend". wouldn't that information be worth a bit t a lot of people? Hopefully this will be a bigger problem for the abbot than Labor. I would trust Labor much MORE than the business controlled abbot group Inc to look after the little people. Abbott has qualified what is the truth from him, but would you trust his qualification. You can be sure he is OWNED by his backers who WILL have their pound of flesh whether it is good for the country or not.

Janet (jan@j4gypsy)

21/05/2013KHTGH at May 20. 2013 03:23 PM: Thank you for the kind comment Knee-High :). PippinbarraFox at May 20. 2013 12:01 PM: Thank you for a comment that is pure poetry (and consummate wordsmithery) in tracing the circular patterns in human communication technologies (or, I think! that’s what you’re doing :-)). It was lovely to see Ken elaborate on your thinking by drawing analogies between bloggers and the pamphleteers of earlier centuries. You are suggesting that the ‘thousand hands’ of the fifth are powerful in their own right and have no need of the now antiquated concepts of journalistic ethics? I would suggest, though, that the old ways are not gone yet, and that the battle to keep them is pretty fierce. Kevin Rennie noted (May 20. 2013 09:22 PM) that sometimes “access is denied to 'citizen' journalists because people are trying to defend their traditional privileges”. And that’s true, as we see with the Press Gallery. But the anxiety engendered in some journalists of integrity about the ‘quality’ of what is being produced by the fifth estate is leading less to denying access and more to bringing the fifth into the fold and ‘upskilling’ it. Surely that is problematic, too, unless the fourth looks very hard at what’s seriously going wrong with itself! Lyn’s Links yesterday brought us a piece from the [i]AFHP[/i] site by Margo Kingston [http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/ethics-overboard-how-to-promote-integrity-in-the-moment-of-choice/]. In Margo’s preamble she wrote: [i]"With all the talk about stronger shield laws for journos, I think we are edging ever closer to needing an answer to the question: What is a journalist? We cannot argue for special protections and exemptions from privacy laws unless we can distinguish ourselves from non-journalists. To me the essential requirement is commitment to a genuinely accountable code of ethics, yet this is still just a dream …I will run several pieces covering different aspects of the ‘What is a journalist’ question in the hope of genuine discussion on this vexed and increasingly urgent issue given the rise and rise of new media."[/i] Lyn’s Links today bring another piece by another practising journalist, Sally Baxter also writing for [i]AFHP[/i] [http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/20/the-art-of-journalism-satisfying-beginners-and-expert-readers/]. It’s an anecdotal piece that’s worth the read and includes this: [i]“… back in those days there was a huge divide between journalist and audience. That’s been smashed and in the ensuing chaos it’s not unusual to stumble upon the existential question: What makes a journalist? If it’s just being an idiot then our numbers are now legion, as the coverage of the Boston bombings made clear, with many journalists performing no better than ordinary citizens. When it comes to accurate reporting it may be we are all just ill-informed idiots now. And yet, we recognise the difference when we see it. It’s the pretty obvious difference between “OMG A BOMB!” and “There are unverified reports of an explosion. Stay tuned for updates”. What makes a journalist? Now, more than ever, the relationship with the audience – the mythical middle manager, the person trying to make ends meet, the person who was described in a different age as the “man on the omnibus,” the idiot. That’s it. Be an idiot, ask the dumb questions any idiot would ask. But, never, ever treat the audience like fools. Not if you want to be a real journalist.”[/i]

Janet (jan@j4gypsy)

21/05/2013Morning Lynnie (at May 20. 2013 05:02 PM), Jane (at May 20. 2013 11:20 PM) and TT (May 21. 2013 01:29 AM). Thanks guys for your kind and generous comments on the piece. (TT: apologies for the ‘scholarly’: old research habits die hard. Really want to be able to write like a journalist! :-)) About [i]PolitiFacts[/i]: Lyn, couldn’t agree more with your delicious and spot-on comment: [i]“If PolitiFact’s Peter Fray! were to fact check the journalists they would be writing all day and all night, there would be a bonfire of pants on fire.” [/i] And agree with TT and Jane’s comments on [i]PolitiFacts[/i], too. I had initially assumed they would pick up on misrepresentation and misleading, value-laden language, as well as non-factual statements in the media. But they’re focusing only on politicians’ statements it seems. While I was one of the tweeps hoping [i]PolitFacts[/i] would come to Oz, I’ve been equally disappointed at the shallowness of their approach. Am leaning more to what the committed bods on Twitter often say: that Twitter’s multi-tentacles provide one of the best fact-checking tools we have!

Ad astra

21/05/2013Lorraine The only suggestion I can make is to 'untick' the box under the Comments box that is adjacent to 'Notify me when new comments are added ' I hope that works. I'll also ask Web Monkey.

Ad astra

21/05/2013Hi Lyn Once again I’ve enjoyed your links. If only MSM journalists were as critical of Tony Abbott’s budget reply speech as was Ian McAuley in [i]New Matilda[/i]. As usual, The Kouk says it the way it is, unlike most of the MSM. And Ross Gittins is as sound as ever. [i]Macrobusiness[/i] is a good find with a succession of good material. Pity Tony Abbott doesn’t read these pieces.

Curi-Oz

21/05/2013Good heavens, Janet. Why would you ever want to write like modern journalists when you can write like journalists used to write, with research and clarity of thought! I read a fair amount online, both for work and for pleasure (like here), and find that a well written piece is always easier to read and understand than some of the dross produced by 'professional journalists'. Fortunately there are still some 'pro-journalists' who can still write in a way that informs rather than merely opine. I wish I could say that I was suprised by PolitiFactsAU, but discovering that the editor was associated with News Ltd did not leave a lot to be surprised at. After all, this is yet another American import (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PolitiFact.com) into Australia's political landscape *sighs* It would be nice if we could find a real Australian version of the idea unassociated with the major news companies... *whistful*

TalkTurkey

21/05/2013Gypsy Jan You could be a decent scholar without being a journalist, but the problem with the journalists of today is that few have ever been decent scholars. They do not know the meaning of intellectual rigour. I'm sorry if my calling your article 'scholarly' seems akin to Sir Humphrey calling an initiative of Minister Hacker 'courageous' but you'll just have to wear it. :)

Michael

21/05/2013The most efficient fact-checking mechanism in contemporary Australian politics is to listen to whatever the most recent utterance from a Coalition politician is, and... Know it ain't a fact. In support of my case, I give you, ta daaa!, Christopher Pyne, Tony Abbott, Joe Hockey, Scott Morrison, Julie Bishop... well, the Coalition party room's membership list is on the Web somewhere.

Janet (j4gypsy)

21/05/2013Ah, you are a clever witty bunch :-). Curi-Oz and TT: I promise from hereonin that I shall never, ever, wish to be like a 'Modern Major Journalist'! :-) And Michael: perfect. :-)

jane

21/05/2013TT, couldn't agree more wrt Politifact. I tried to give it the benefit of the doubt after that first verdict, but as you say it seems to be pursuing an agenda set bya certain wizened foreigner, I suspect. WRT the Rupert tweet, do you reckon with a mug like that, he'd even have a mirror anywhere near him? I must say he looks just like the picture of Dorian Gray in the attic. Pity we couldn't lock the old mongrel in the attic with just that vile face for company. [quote]Pity Tony Abbott doesn’t read these pieces.[/quote] Would he understand them if he did manage to read them, Ad astra? Blimey, i was going to read comments today, but by the look of the feast Lyn's set before us, I may be some time.

Pappinbarra Fox

21/05/2013Janet at 9.51 you said [quote]You are suggesting that the ‘thousand hands’ of the fifth are powerful in their own right and have no need of the now antiquated concepts of journalistic ethics? [/quote] Nah I was alluding to a thousand hands (like a thousand cranes)clapping singly. But you make insightful points otherwise so "ta". As to ethics I was suggesting that the current journos have abbrogated their ethical approach to their trade (at the covert [or overt]behest of their lord and maaster). The need for ethics in all discourse is paramount, but observed more in the breach than the adherence with todays journos. The point I was making though, was that the trade of journalism has been a brief interlude in the history of humankind and human communication. Lasting what, a coupla hunnert years at best - preceded by gossip and postceded by gossip - of which the current journos are leading the uptake and thus contributing to the demise of ethical "news" communication. Twitter is gossip on steroids, but bloggin' in some cases is hanging onto rational discourse, though not in other cases - to wit the trolls here, there and everywhere. Oh and Ken - good point too. Cheers

Patriciawa

21/05/2013Wow, Janet! Ad Astra was understating things a bit with his initial description of your post as [i]thought provoking![/i] Looking back on all the commentary you've 'provoked' I think he'd agree that [i]'mind boggling!'[/i] might be an understatement too! Reading your article and following up on your links has absorbed me since most of yesterday, and then catching up on all the links of the commentators who've felt compelled to put their oar in too is still challenging me. I still am only half way through Lyn's Links which I normally see as my first reading treat of the day. But I've had to stop reading to tell you that like Talk Turkey I'm looking forward to seeing more of your stimulating stuff here at the Sword. You've obviously hit on a pretty hot topic here, but your manner of presenting it, backed up with sound arguments and searching links suggests we'll be similarly stimulated with whatever you and AA agree should be the topic of your next post. The failure to our democracy of our current main stream print media, the fourth estate, suborned as it has been by Rupert Murdoch, is very much on our minds as we approach this election. Thank providence for the fifth estate, poised to replace it, where we citizen writers have an opportunity to become as useful, even powerful, as those [i]'pamphleteers'[/i] of the past, as one of your commentators has suggested. Thank you! Back to reading now.

42 long

21/05/2013Do Journalists like kate McClymont and others realise they are trashing their trade? Reputations cannot be bought. They are earned

Sir Ian Crisp

21/05/2013[quote][b]Feel the WINDS OF CHANGE...ARROGANT ABBOTT ABOUT TO BE TOPPLED OFF HIS PERCH. N' nasking [/b][/quote] Essential Research says you're dreaming (or is it larfin'). May 20 2PP figures remain unchanged with ALP on 45% and the other mob on 55%. I think I know what it is you feel and yes it's wind all right but it's foul smelling. Better tell Essential Research to wake up and start reporting more accurately.

TalkTurkey

21/05/2013Gypsy Jan, Patricia is quite right, this article of yours is really astonishingly germane, it's not just the substance which is impressively researched: what is best about it is the very choice of subject, it is the very nub!

Ken

21/05/2013Fiona love the close-up cat gravatar but I'm replying to congatulate you on making the link with the pamphleteers back in 2008. (and I do mean that sincerely). As a bit of a closet amateur historian myself I am always pleased to see others making the historical connections with current events and activities. It's a pity more people don't understand history. I'm always amazed watching telly how little so many people know about our history, including many young journalists. Society has changed and now, it appears, that history is something that happened a month ago and ancient history perhaps a year ago. We live in a time when the present is all embracing, in my view, to our detriment - as the Santayana aphorism says, [quote]Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.[/quote] I won't go on as this is one of my hobby horses. But good to see your comment.

bob macalba

21/05/2013Another headache for the tory[bastards] to deal with, check out the Drum poll, its only early but 60% believe abbort will bring back workchoices...tick tock http://www.abc.net.au/news/thedrum/ nice article Jan[gypsy] enjoyed it and all the accompanying comments. cheers

bob macalba

21/05/2013Meant to post this as well http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4702770.html cheers

DMW

21/05/2013Jayfa, [i]How cool is that?, as someone a quarter of my age might say[/i] Would someone about 5 years and 3 months really say that? :P

Janet (jan@j4gypsy)

21/05/2013Timely, apt and ept: Mr Demore's [b]'Damned lies and journalism'[/b]. S[i]o ask yourself: When did journalism become defined by an ability to just make stuff up so long as it attracts sufficient eyeballs? When did success in journalism become defined as a capacity for creating click-bait that panders to prejudice, ignorance and the ambitions of flaky political carpetbaggers? When did business journalism become about supplying unpaid PR spin for rent-seeking lobbies seeking to pass off their own commercial interests as the public interest? At what point did economic journalists decide that the facts were just too inconvenient to fit a prevailing political narrative? Finally, when did we sit back in Australia and decide to let a US citizen who presides over an organisation that hacks phones, promotes illegal wars and trashes corporate governance to promote regime change and run our democracy by remote? And, ladies and gentlemen, Mr Murdoch does all of this in the name of freedom.[/i] http://thefailedestate.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/damned-lies-and-journalism.html?spref=tw

Patriciawa

22/05/2013 [b]Remember! “True Liberty Is When Free-born Men Speak Free!” [/b] John Milton’s [i]Areopagitica,[/i] Crying freedom for the press Back in 17th century England, Resisted monarchy’s excess. His tract was a mighty weapon In democracy’s progress. We are the beneficiaries Of his most eloquent address. But we ‘free-born’ are complicit, As we watch and acquiesce While that freedom is abused With a brazen shamelessness. We encouraged one man’s ambition To buy up, control, possess As property our thoughts in print, And we applauded his success. We shared profits with this behemoth Who now destroys our happiness And publishes news of the world, Writ as he commands it be expressed. This threat of global tyranny, Warns that it’s time to re-possess What for him is now a licence To break all rules and decency transgress. Our precious freedom so perverted Has caused democracy’s regress. Let’s use our laws while we still can, Redeem ourselves, and truly free the press. http://polliepomes.wordpress.com/2011/07/08/remember-true-liberty-is-when-free-born-men-speak-free/

lyn

22/05/2013Today’s Links Damned Lies and Journalism by @MrDenmore presented as "news" (not opinion) by the likes of the Daily Telegraph and the Herald Sun, are not true. They are misrepresentations, they are distortions and, in some cases, they are outright lies manufactured by a media magnate seeking to deliver an election outcome http://thefailedestate.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/damned-lies-and-journalism.html?spref=tw The Imaginary Budget Emergency by @beneltham there can be no doubt that some serious austerity is on the cards should the Coalition take office. “Thanks to Labor’s poor management over five years, there is now a budget emergency,” Abbott claimed, a statement that must rather surprise the finance ministers of Greece and Cyprus. http://newmatilda.com/2013/05/21/imaginary-budget-emergency What is Abbott up to? by @LarvatusProdeo By the way, the gallery that clapped Abbott so enthusiastically was an invited audience. I wonder whether there is scope for games to be played on this one. http://larvatusprodeo.net/archives/2013/05/what-is-abbott-up-to/ Why Are theRight So Feral? by @saint13333 Never in my life have I come across a human rabble so feral. So nefarious, so malevolent, so xenophobic, so bigoted, so crass, so homophobic so ubiquitous, discourteous and disgustingly bad mannered. http://theaimn.com/2013/05/21/why-are-theright-so-feral/ Opposition claim about Budget and PEFO by @PMOPressOffice Tony Abbott and Joe Hockey claim they cannot release their fully costed and funded commitments until after Pre-election Economic and Fiscal Outlook (PEFO) is released because they say the fiscal and economic figures produced in the Budget are not accurate and cannot be trusted. http://pmopressoffice.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/opposition-claim-about-budget-and-pefo/?blogsub=confirming#subscribe-blog Budgeting in Challenging Times by Treasury Address to The Australian Business Economists, Dr Martin Parkinson PSM | Secretary to the Treasury http://www.treasury.gov.au/PublicationsAndMedia/Speeches/2013/Budgeting-in-Challenging-Times Hockey strenuously denies negative gearing review Shadow Treasurer did not, or is not, examining the perverse tax with a view to reform.On one final note, in its two and half year history of cutting edge analysis, not once has MB been approached so quickly about reversing a story. Nnnnzzzzzz. http://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2013/05/hockey-strenuously-denies-negative-gearing-review/ Fund managers hold the Aussie dollar in their hands by @TheKouk I have been speaking to a number of top-tier fund managers dotted around the world. On balance, each probably has a quite a few billion dollars tied up in their Australian bond and fixed income portfolios and with the stunning strength of the Australian dollar and http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/4/24/economy/fund-managers-hold-aussie-dollar-their-hands#ixzz2Tuux80E0 It’s All About The dB/km’s by @sortius it has become increasingly apparent even to the layman that Malcolm Turnbull’s broadband policy is a dud. There are no redeeming features (it’s not cheap, it won’t be deployed faster, & the cost/benefit of the policy is hard to see in a positive light) http://sortius-is-a-geek.com/?p=2983 Chocolate-box TV’: Carlton blasts Hadley Oz Story ‘travesty’ by @KnottMatthew “I described his program as a temple of hatred … By selectively and deceptively editing me, By selectively and deceptively editing me, they recruited me into his fan club.” http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/05/21/chocolate-box-tv-carlton-blasts-hadley-oz-story-travesty/ The Power of fibre by @ALeighMP Tony Abbott's brash statement that he is 'confident 25 megs is enough for the average household' reminds me how easy it is to underestimate the changes that technology can bring. When I bought my first computer in 1984, it had 3½ kilobytes of memory. That sounds tiny now, but it was about that time http://www.onlineopinion.com.au/view.asp?article=15029 Trying for Pyne and Entsch accountability on @MRowlandMP baby leave by @margokingston1 It’s an accountability responsibility of the fourth estate which involves seeking to uncover the truth and insisting that politicians who have not told the truth correct the record and explain the reasons for their falsehoods. http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/trying-for-pyne-and-entsch-accountability-on-mrowlandmp-baby-leave/ Oops I Did It Again by @madwixxy For McClymont to attack him via the press based on flawed so-called investigations, the word of dodgy witnesses, and outright lies, is not only an attack on Thomson, it is an attack on democracy by a member of the main stream press http://wixxyleaks.com/2013/05/21/oops-i-did-it-again/ Forget the Messenger & focus on the Message for a change by @YaThinkN I don’t know why Kevin Rudd has raised this issue again. For all I know he really does care & has been doing some soul searching. He could also be trying to raise his profile again, who knows. http://yathink.com.au/article-display/forget-the-messenger-focus-on-the-message-for-a-change,73 To the Node Policy by @AshGhebranious The coalition are not fans of addressing an issue so much as masking one. Their concept of financial management is to minimise spending, including on investment projects. http://ashghebranious.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/to-the-node-policy/ Budgets, A Letter, Calibre, Emergencies, Contemplative Moments & Sheep by @knarfnamduh I was particularly impressed by the NO Coalition loading up the general public area with supporters who cheered and clapped at every utterance of the Leader of the Opposition. As a budget reply it left much to be desired, long on slagging and short on detail. http://deknarf.wordpress.com/2013/05/21/graphical-manipulations-35-budgets-a-letter-calibre-emergencies-contemplative-moments-sheep/ A letter from the Office of the Prime Minister by @TeamOyeniyi I am pleased to see, despite it being budget week last week, we have a Prime Minister who does communicate with the electorate. While Julia has not read Love versus Goliath, http://teamoyeniyi.com/2013/05/20/a-letter-from-the-office-of-the-prime-minister/ Gresham’s Second Law by @watermelon_man The ABC, retaining the air of authority, of credibility, of objectivity, built up carefully over decades by good people, is providing legitimacy in turn to News Ltd. The procession of News Ltd journalists, columnists, the reviewing of the papers, the breathless presentation of Murdoch Memes, all replace the original good http://davidhortonsblog.com/2013/05/21/greshams-second-law/ Radio 2GB launches its own Media Watch by @mumbrella Jonathan Holmes, stands down by the end of the month, as I read.”Bolt didn’t get the gig rather Paul Barry did… but that hasn’t stop Andrew and night host Steve Price setting up their very own Media Watch http://mumbrella.com.au/radio-2gb-launches-its-own-media-watch-157093 What’s life really like on the NBN? (Part II) by Computerworld Williams has been connected to the NBN for around 15 months and is on the 100/40Mbps speed with Exetel, paying around $50 a month. Williams says she signed up to the fastest speed on the network because the price was comparable to what she was paying on ADSL2 with TPG. http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/462402/what_life_really_like_nbn_part_ii_/?fp=16&fpid=1 Today’s Front Pages Australian Newspaper Front Pages for 22 May 2013 http://www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm News headlines http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

Janet (j4gypsy)

22/05/2013PatriciaWa at May 21. 2013 05:46 PM, and at May 22. 2013 12:27 AM: Thank you Patricia for your kind and encouraging comments. (Have felt very privileged to have the opportunity from Ad to share discussion with TPSers this way.) Thank you, too, for re-posting your fine poem from your own blog site, and for leading us back to your collection of resource articles on the biggest battle the PM faces: the battle to overcome Murdoch! TT at May 21. 2013 06:58 PM: Yes, the topic is germane - that never more superbly illustrated than by following Patricia's link to find this piece from Ad from 12 months ago!: http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/post/2012/05/05/Julia-Gillard-can-defeat-Tony-Abbott-in-2013-But-how-does-she-neutralize-Rupert-Murdoch.aspx It's more than worth reading again for Ad's always acute observations and absolute prescience. Bob at May 21. 2013 07:27 PM: Glad you enjoyed the piece and are enjoying the ensuing discussion. DMW at May 21. 2013 08:36 PM: As one might have said when one [i]was[/i] a quarter of one's present age: 'Flattery will get you absolutely nowehere!' :-). (Nice to see you back, by the way; was wondering where you were ...) Lynnie, at 6.41 a.m. today: you are, as ever, the most remarkable tweetie that ever flew across the blogosphere, gathering tidbits from the fifth to fight the wicked Murdochian wizard, leader of the fourth :-).

nasking

22/05/2013 NOTICED ON ABC 24 THIS MORN TIM WILSON FROM THE LIBERAL PARTY/LIBERTARIAN THINK TANK...THE MOOD WAS SOMBRE ALL MORNING, APPROPRIATELY, DUE TO THE UNFOLDING TRAGIC SCENES FROM THE TORNADO... YET TIM SITS THERE WITH A BIG GRIN ON HIS MUG GOING "GOOD MORNING!!!" IN A LOUD VOICE. TELLS ME EVERYTHING ABOUT THAT IPA LOT. LACK OF EMPATHY. IT'S ALL ABOUT SOCIAL ENGINEERING AND CUTTING TAXES FOR THE CORPORATIONS. AND OF COURSE, THEY ARE CLIMATE CHANGE SCEPTICS IN THE POCKET OF BIG OIL AND BIG COAL. I HOPE AUSTRALIA KNOWS WHAT IT'S IN FOR IF THIS LOT GET VOTED IN. BTW, HOW WONDERFUL THAT ELDERLY LADY FOUND HER DOG. HAD A FEW TEARS. N'

Ad astra

22/05/2013LYN'S DAILY LINKS updated: http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/page/LYNS-DAILY-LINKS.aspx

Ad astra

22/05/2013Hi Lyn I couldn’t resist reading Mr Denmore’s piece [i]Damned Lies and Journalism[/i] before getting out of bed on this frigid morning. It is magnificent. Everyone, including journalists, and in particular Murdoch journalists, must read it. It feeds into the piece I’m now writing for this coming weekend. http://thefailedestate.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/damned-lies-and-journalism.html BTW, I’m over my usage limit, so I’m slowed to dial-up speed. Therefore I probably won’t be around much today, until I get to Melbourne this evening where I’m on ADSL.

nasking

22/05/2013 Just got off the phone with a good friend in Sydney who cleans a lot of people's houses...and being a highly sociable character he speaks to a lot of people...I mean this fella speaks to hundreds of people a month he's so gregarious... he reckons the hate and distrust of Abbott is growing...so many beginning to realise how bad a government under him would be. He told me he was SURE Julia was gonna WIN. First time he's said that to me...and I ring him once a month. I was gobsmacked. N'

nasking

22/05/2013 PERHAPS ABBOTT WILL PRETEND OTHERWISE...THIS COULD BE ANOTHER LIBERAL GAME...AND IT CERTAINLY WILL BE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR THEM TO OPEN UP SOME SPURIOUS DEBATE ABOUT MONOPOLIES AND TAXPAYER'S DOLLARS...JUST LIKE IN THE UK... BUT THE CORPORATISATION OF THE PUBLIC BROADCASTER IS ALREADY GOING ON... AND WE KNOW THAT [b]IN THE LONG RUN THE WORK OF MAKING THE ABC AND SBS INTO BORG-LIKE ENTITIES IS TO SUIT MURDOCH, CHANNEL NINE AND FRIENDS... THE ABC AND SBS WILL BE FILLED WITH THEIR CORPORATE DRONES ACTING OUT THE WISHES OF QUEEN RUPERT AS PART OF THE HIVE.[/b] [b]HOW MUCH POWER CAN ONE GREEDY UGLY FCKER WANT?:[/b] [b]State Liberals propose privatising ABC, SBS[/b] http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/political-news/state-liberals-propose-privatising-abc-sbs-20130521-2jz5d.html KNOW A BORG-LIKE MURDOCH PROPAGANDA SHIP WHEN YOU SEE ONE. EVEN STEPHEN CONROY HAS BORG CHARACTERISTICS. AS FOR THE IPA's JOHN ROSKAM...AND TIM WILSON...CORPORATE CYBERNETIC ORGANISMS PRETENDING TO BE LIBERTARIAN FREE SPEECHERS... THEY ARE A NEW VERSION...TRYING TO SEDUCE THE AVERAGE FOLK... ASSIMILATE THEM...GRINNING LIKE CHESHIRE CATS... ALL HAIL THE MURDOCH HIVE AND THEIR FOREVER WAR ON YER POCKETS AND RATIONAL THINKING...RUNNING ON THE HOPE OF NUCLEAR ENERGY...AND MORE THAN A SNIFF OF AN OLD OILY RAG. BELIEVE ME...RESISTANCE IS NOT...I REPEAT NOT...FUTILE. N'

nasking

22/05/2013 ABBOTT AND NEWMAN TOGETHER IS LIKE COSTELLO AND NEWMAN TOGETHER. N'

nasking

22/05/2013 TONY ABBOTT...ADULT: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=upDGAtHzwxg N'

nasking

22/05/2013 MORE OF TONY ABBOTT...ADULT: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=QxwkbkXGPdM&feature=related N'

nasking

22/05/2013 I RANG MY WIFE YESTERDAY AFTER SCHOOL AND TOLD HER ABOUT THE TORNADO...SHE HADN'T HEARD...WAS RUNNING LATE, TWO HOURS AFTER SCHOOL HAD ENDED... SHE WAS VOLUNTEERING AT THE HOMEWORK CENTRE. TELLS YA SOMETHING ABOUT THE COMMITMENT OF TEACHERS...AND A LOT ABOUT THOSE WHO DUMP ON THEM... AND WANT TO MAKE THEM CASUALTIES AS THEY CUT TO THE BONE: Sixth-grade teacher Rhonda Crosswhite was among those who stayed behind. She hid in a bathroom stall with six of the children and draped herself across them as the tornado struck. Students screamed and begged for her not to die. She shouted reassurances back and prayed. By the time the tornado had passed, it had completely shredded the school building around them. There were children who didn’t survive. But Crosswhite and the children she protected all lived. Crosswhite’s story is already one of the best-known examples of teacher heroism to emerge from Monday night’s devastation in Moore, Oklahoma. There are others: educators at Plaza Towers and Briarwood Elementary pulled children out of the rubble, shielded them from harm, or just comforted them in the face of unimaginable destruction. Last December, several teachers and a principal at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, died along with students when a gunman entered the school and opened fire. Other teachers hid their students in classrooms and closets, helping them to be quiet and safe until the shooting stopped. “[b]You don’t go into teaching for the money,” Oklahoma Education Association president Linda Hampton told MSNBC Tuesday. ”You go into teaching because you care about the kids. You spend more of your waking hours as a teacher with those children than anyone does, and they become your children. And just like any parent, you’re going to protect them at all costs.”[/b] Yet the role of protector during the hours in which children are in their care sometimes seems to have been lost in the public debate about education. Rarely recognized as champions of their students, public educators are more often targets of small-government conservatives and education reformers. Teachers across the country have watched their profession chipped away by school closures, mass layoffs, budget cuts, and other measures. Pressure to deliver top test scores has led to backlashes in some areas of the country. And cheating scandals, in which some educators altered scores to help advance their schools or protect themselves, harmed the reputations of teachers nationwide just as many were struggling to keep their jobs. Since 2009, local and state-level budget cuts have cost public educators over 300,000 jobs. Tens of thousands more could disappear as a result of the federal government’s across-the-board spending cuts known as the sequester. In Chicago, teachers are currently fighting what could be the largest round of school closures ever to occur in a single American school district with 54 schools on the line. In Michigan, more than 50 districts face budget deficits and the specter of a state-imposed Emergency Manager who could order further cuts. In 2011, teachers in Wisconsin lost the right to collective bargaining. And across the country, educators are being squeezed by high-stakes testing, concessionary contract bargaining, and charter schools which sap their student populations. These policies are usually implemented in the name of fiscal prudence and school reform. “The biggest trend that has impacted [teachers] has been the cuts to education funding, and that translates into a whole lot of different things,” including mass layoffs, larger class sizes and limited resources, said National Education Association president Dennis Van Roekel. http://tv.msnbc.com/2013/05/21/americas-teachers-heroes-in-a-crisis-but-otherwise-under-fire/ AND YOU WONDER WHY I DETEST THE CORPORATISATION OF OUR WORLD... AND THAT SMUG MEGA-RICH LITTLE BASTARD MURDOCH SITTING IN HIS CONTROL TOWER SENDING HIS TABLOID BORG-LIKE MUCK-RACKERS OUT THERE TIME AND TIME AGAIN TO PAINT ALL TEACHERS WITH THE SAME NEGATIVE BRUSH... CREATING A LACK OF CONFIDENCE IN TEACHERS...PARTICULARLY PUBLIC SCHOOL ONES... JUST SO HE CAN USE HIS POLITICIANS DRIVEN BY MANIPULATED POLLS AND SHOCK JOCKS AND RANTING VOICES TO UNDERMINE THE UNIONS...DESTROY COLLECTIVE BARGAINING...MAKE CUTS...REDUCE PAY AND SUPERANNUATION...TURN THEM INTO SERFS... COMPETING WITH EACH OTHER IN A SOCIAL DARWINIAN NIGHTMARE... WHILST HE SITS LORDING OVER ALL... CREATING A DYNASTY OF BORGS. FOR HIS PROFITEERING, CRUSADING FOREVER WAR. [b]NOT ON MY WATCH.[/b] DON'T TRUST ANY KIND GESTURES BY NEWS CORPORATION TOWARDS PUBLIC TEACHERS...THEY ARE TRAINED TO FOOL...AND SEDUCE... [b]FAUX BALANCE.[/b] N'

lyn

22/05/2013Good Morning Ad I don't blame you, the weather is freezing here too. Mr Denmore another enjoyable read, he gets it right all the time every time. My days have turned into a busy nightmare. We are moving, our house sold in one week and the buyer's house sold in one day. Everything happened in a minute, so now there is a frantic, flapping, frenzy going on. We are moving to the next suburb but doesn't lessen the work involved. Talk Turkey, as always a big thankyou. Patricia, thankyou , your work is appreciated very much, you are a treasure. Jane, thankyou to you, your comments are always golden. Janie Gypsy, thankyou, you are our VIP celebrity, we love your work. A few links for you all, Abbott’s been praying for victory. ABC and SBS are being threatened . John Pratt ‏ Abbott 'prays every day' for election victory. We've got to wipe the smile of this bastards face! #auspol http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/-2jxw1.html David Donovan ‏Mark Scott makes ABC staff pander to IPA & LNP over fear of losing their jobs under Abbott. But they will anyway. http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/political-news/state-liberals-propose-privatising-abc-sbs-20130521-2jz5d.html#poll … State Liberals propose privatising ABC, SBS Tony Abbott is facing internal pressure from Victorian Liberals to privatise the ABC and SBS if he wins the September 14 election amid claims both organisations are struggling to comply with their charters. http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/state-liberals-propose-privatising-abc-sbs-20130521-2jz5d.html#ixzz2TyNEBGzW 100 Ways to Stop Tony Abbott Countdown It’s time to use our collective strength to turn the momentum against the conservatives and stop Tony Abbott once and for all.From 7 June this website and linked Twitter and Facebook accounts will be providing you with 100 practical ways to stop a Liberal/National victory http://stoptony2013.com/ margo kingston ‏ Our Paper's page 1 lead: Abbott 'prays every day' for election victory http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/abbott-prays-every-day-for-election-victory-20130521-2jxw1.html …, see more http://tweetedtimes.com/margokingston1 :):):):)

nasking

22/05/2013 SKY NEWS IS JUST ANOTHER MURDOCH BORG-LIKE ASSIMILATION SHIP... EVERY TIME I WATCH THEM GRIN I SEE THE REAL LACK OF EMPATHY BENEATH...THE GREED...[b]THE SLY DRONES SENT OUT TO DELIVER THE MESSAGE[/b]... TO SEDUCE...IN THEIR POSH OUTFITS...WITH SMUG, ARROGANT SMILES...EYES LIKE BLACK HOLES... [b]WORKING DAY AND NIGHT AS PART OF THE MURDOCH HIVE.[/b] AS THO THEY GIVE A CRAP ABOUT PEOPLE STRUGGLING ON NEWSTART...THE HOMELESS...SINGLE MUMS...ASYLUM SEEKERS... [b]THE MURDOCH EMPIRE OF TABLOID POISON[/b] IN THE UK AND THE USA...AND HERE...HAVE CONSTANTLY USED THESE PEOPLE AS POLITICAL FOOTBALLS... [b]SKY NEWS/SLY NEWS...YET ANOTHER BORG-LIKE SEDUCER... A MENACE TO DECENT & FAIR SOCIETY.[/b] N'

DMW

22/05/2013One way to look at this (excellent) post, as suggested by Ken and Fiona, is that j4gypsy has published her pamphlet and, as I type this, there are 100 'Letters to the Editor/Pamphleteer' below the line. Blogs are in one way the 'modern' Leters to the Editor page, rolling conversations/commentaries on what the 'pamphleteers' are writing. They can be interesting as well as dull, colourless and boring. In years to come some blogs will become gold mines for social historians attempting to tap into the thoughts of people around events great and not so great that happen around us. For those interested in how the Parliamentary Press Gallery operated in the past you will learn a lot from a gentleman who was 'the journalist's journalist', the late Rob Chalmers. Rob served the people as a journalist in the gallery for sixty years, four months and eighteen days, longer even than the longest serving politician, Billy Hughes, who served for a mere 51 years. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Hughes) Rob's memoir [b][i]Inside the Canberra Press Gallery[/b] - Life in the Wedding Cake of Old Parliament House [/i] is available for download at the ANU's E-Press and is well worth getting for a weekend snuggled up by the fire for a long read. [i]Before television, radio, and later the internet came to dominate the coverage of Australian politics, the Canberra Press Gallery existed in a world far removed from today’s 24-hour news cycle, spin doctors and carefully scripted sound bites. This historical memoir of a career reporting from The Wedding Cake of Old Parliament House offers a rare insider’s perspective on both how the gallery once operated and its place in the Australian body politic. Using some of the biggest political developments of the past fifty years as a backdrop, Inside the Canberra Press Gallery – Life in the Wedding Cake of Old Parliament House sheds light on the inner workings of an institution critical to the health of our parliamentary democracy. ... As well as being considered a shrewd political analyst, Chalmers was a much-loved member of the gallery and a past president of the National Press Club. Rob Chalmers used to boast that he had outlasted 11 prime ministers; and a 12th, Julia Gillard described him as ‘one of the greats’ of Australian political journalism upon his passing.[/i] http://epress.anu.edu.au/titles/australia-and-new-zealand-school-of-government-anzsog-2/wedding_cake_citation As John Faulkner notes in his Foreword to the memoir [i]If the Canberra Press Gallery is an institution, Rob Chalmers was an institution of that institution.[/i]

Ken

22/05/2013I’ve been thinking about some of the posts here (especially pappinbarra fox, janet, DMW) and decided that we have a continuum in this debate. 1. Fact 2. Explanation (of the facts) 3. Interpretation (which can be like an opinion but based on the facts) 4. Opinion (which can relate to facts and interpretation or be based on gossip) 5. Gossip (which may or may not have any relevance to fact) 6. Vituperation and invective (usually based on gossip if it has any basis at all and which I have added in recognition of the current situation) As added background, I note that quality papers, such as the New York Times and the Washington Post, on their websites, separately identify “opinion” pieces from their news reporting. And other papers, such as the Guardian, while not specifically stating which are opinion pieces, do identify “columnists”, which, one assumes, amounts to much the same thing. Once opinion in newspapers only appeared as editorials. As we have been discussing, the press is blurring the first four items in my list, and in the case of the Murdoch press, I think they are blurring all six. I think that is deliberate. It makes it easier to present opinion as fact, and gossip and invective as opinion, and to pretend that “columnists” are presenting fact. The blurring helps confuse the electorate as to what is real. For me, the shock jocks operate with the last three. As Pappinbarra Fox suggested, much of the twitterverse (but not all) operates around gossip and invective. The good parts of the fifth estate, like the pamphleteers, operates primarily around explanation and interpretation, primarily as alternatives to the so-called explanation and interpretation of the fourth estate. But, as has been noted, the fifth is not without its own “shock jocks”. So on this continuum, “opinion” is the key turning point, i.e. whether it is based on the preceding three in my list or whether it is based on the final two. Because everyone is entitled to an opinion, we will never have just the better quality opinion, but, in the case of newspapers, if they are to justify their existance, they should not be competing at the lower end of this spectrum (others do that better!!!) but clearly delineating that they operate primarily on the first three and separately identifying their opinion pieces (editorials and columnists).

nasking

22/05/2013 THIS VID GOES BACK...CHECK OUT THE COMMENTS TOO: PUBLIC HOUSING http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TctXUT5_YtU

nasking

22/05/2013 HOCKEY BLOWHARDING TO THE PRESS CORPSES...A FEW GOOD QUESTIONS...BUT JOE MOSTLY BLAAHH BLAAHH BLAAH: The Australia Institute has calculated that if the Howard, Rudd and Gillard governments had left the tax rates unchanged at their 2005 level, then this year the federal budget would have collected about $39 billion more in additional revenue. [b]The Australia Institute’s modelling also shows that the rich gained the biggest share of those tax cuts. Denniss wrote: “The top 10% of income earners received a bigger share of those tax revenues than the bottom 80% combined.” It is not just these generous cuts in the income tax paid by the wealthy that have put the budget under pressure. There is also “the enormous cost of the tax concessions on superannuation, the decision to tax income from capital gain at half the rate that ordinary income is taxed and the rise and rise of the cost of tax concessions and subsidies to profitable industries such as mining and unprofitable industries such as logging.” The tax concession on super earnings has increased in cost from $9.5 billion in 2009-10 to $32 billion in 2012-13 and Treasury predicts that will rise to $45 billion by 2015-16, by which time it will overtake the cost of the age pension, as Mike Steketee pointed out in the ABC's The Drum on February 22. The public subsidies to the mining industry are calculated to be $4 billion a year by the Australian Institute and Gillard's weak Minerals Resource Rent Tax (MRRT) not only is collecting less than forecast (a miserable $126 million in its first six months), the generous deductions mean some of the biggest and richest mining companies are billions of dollars in credit. An ABC news report on May 9 said: “The mining tax allows companies to offset the value of their mines against the tax they have to pay, and the 2012 financial reports of BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto show that amounted to tax credits worth $644 million and more than $1.1 billion respectively. “Hancock Prospecting's freshly lodged 2012 financial report — submitted to the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) six months late — shows it has an even bigger credit against the mining tax worth $1.16 billion.” The report said Andrew Forrest's Fortescue Metals has repeatedly said it does not expect to pay any mining tax in the “foreseeable future” because it has claimed an MRRT credit of almost $3.5 billion. This brings the total mining tax credits of the big four iron-ore producers to almost $6.4 billion. The big mining companies have gotten away with daylight robbery and this is why the Socialist Alliance is campaigning for the nationalisation of the mines and banks under the control of the people. Then there are the billions misspent on imperial occupations of Iraq and Afghanistan, the purchase of expensive war planes and submarines...[/b] [b]Denniss said: “Australia is one of the richest countries in the world living at the wealthiest point in world history. We can afford to do anything that we want, but we can't afford to do everything we want. If we wanted to spend more on health, education and transport we could. The fact that we don't is proof either that we as a community don't want to or that our elected representatives aren't listening to us.” But the public clearly does want money to be spent on what is urgently needed for the common good. This was clear for all to see in the political wedging games the big parties are playing around the issues of “Gonski” school funding, national disability care funding and industrial relations.[/b] http://www.greenleft.org.au/node/54044 NO LONGER EYES WIDE SHUT N'

nasking

22/05/2013 IPA's JOHN ROSKAM SMILES SMUGLY ON SLY NEWS SAYING HE WANTS TO PRIVATISE THE ABC... TRYING TO CONVINCE US THAT IT HASN'T ALREADY BECOME CORPORATISED...BECOME A NEO-LIBERAL HAVEN... [b]IT'S ALL SMOKE AND MIRRORS... GIVING ABBOTT & TURNBULL AN OPPORTUNITY TO SAY THEY WON'T PRIVATIZE... WHEN IN FACT THERE'S NO NEED...THE CORPORATISATION PROCESS GOES ON EVERY DAY...UNDER HOWARD, UNDER RUDD...UNDER GILLARD... [/b] SOME ABC CHARACTERS USING IT AS A [b]CASH COW... EVEN MURDOCH EMPIRE BOOKS ARE SOLD THERE UNDER AN AGREEMENT[/b]: [b]JOHN ROSKAM...attended Xavier College... Culturally, Xavier was described in June 2009 by old scholar John Roskam as "the last bastion of old-style Labor Right, DLP education... From same jesuit, Roman Catholic school: Gerard Henderson – syndicated newspaper columnist and former adviser to Prime Minister John Howard[/b] Wikipedia John Roskam has been the executive director of the Institute of Public Affairs, widely regarded as Australia’s foremost free-market think-tank, since 2004. Before joining the IPA he taught political theory at the University of Melbourne. John was previously executive director of the Menzies Research Centre in Canberra, and has been a senior adviser and chief of staff to federal and state education ministers. He has also been manager of government and corporate affairs for a global mining company. Born and bred in Melbourne, John went to Xavier College and completed his law and economics degrees at the University of Melbourne. http://www.abc.net.au/tv/qanda/txt/s3214160.htm THE CON GOES ON. THE IPA USES THE ABC LIKE PART OF ITS PROPAGANDA MACHINE...ALWAYS WELOMED HEARTILY BY HOSTS/PRESENTERS... TIM WILSON ON THERE JUST THIS MORN. WHO THE FCK DO THEY THINK THEY ARE KIDDING? THE CON GOES ON... N'

nasking

22/05/2013 WHEN YOU HEAR JOHN DELLA BOSCA ON SLY NEWS SAYING PERHAPS THE ABC NEEDS A SLIGHT ADJUSTMENT DUE TO BIAS... YOU KNOW THE ALP HAS BEEN INFILTRATED...FULL OF TOO MANY CORPORATISED AND BOUGHT SPINMEISTERS. HOW MUCH MONEY AND BLACKMAILING DID IT TAKE TO TURN THEM INTO PUPPETS I WONDER??? N'

Ad astra

22/05/2013Folks We are now getting on the road to Melbourne. Back this evening.

nasking

22/05/2013 HAVE A SAFE RIDE AD. MEMORIES...IF THE CORPORATISATION OF SOCIETY AND TAX CUTS FOR THE RICH GOES ON YA WONDER WHERE THIS WILL ALL HEAD?: [b]May 1968 events in France - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The May 1968 events in France were a volatile period of civil unrest punctuated by massive general strikes and the occupation of factories and universities across France. It was the largest general strike ever attempted in France, and the first ever nation-wide wildcat general strike.[/b] Following months of conflicts between students and authorities at the University of Paris at Nanterre, the administration shut down the university on 2 May 1968. Students at the Sorbonne University in Paris met on 3 May to protest against the closure and the threatened expulsion of several students at Nanterre. On Monday, 6 May, the national student union, the Union Nationale des Étudiants de France (UNEF) — still the largest student union in France today — and the union of university teachers called a march to protest against the police invasion of Sorbonne. More than 20,000 students, teachers and supporters marched towards the Sorbonne, still sealed off by the police, who charged, wielding their batons, as soon as the marchers approached. While the crowd dispersed, some began to create barricades out of whatever was at hand, while others threw paving stones, forcing the police to retreat for a time. The police then responded with tear gas and charged the crowd again. Hundreds more students were arrested. High school student unions spoke in support of the riots on 6 May. The next day, they joined the students, teachers and increasing numbers of young workers who gathered at the Arc de Triomphe to demand that: all criminal charges against arrested students be dropped, the police leave the university, and the authorities reopen Nanterre and Sorbonne. Negotiations broke down, and students returned to their campuses after a false report that the government had agreed to reopen them, only to discover the police still occupying the schools. The students now had a near revolutionary fervor. On Friday, 10 May, another huge crowd congregated on the Rive Gauche. When the Compagnies Républicaines de Sécurité again blocked them from crossing the river, the crowd again threw up barricades, which the police then attacked at 2:15 in the morning after negotiations once again floundered. The confrontation, which produced hundreds of arrests and injuries, lasted until dawn of the following day. The events were broadcast on radio as they occurred and the aftermath was shown on television the following day. Allegations were made that the police had participated, through agents provocateurs, in the riots, by burning cars and throwing Molotov cocktails. The government's heavy-handed reaction brought on a wave of sympathy for the strikers. Many of the nation's more mainstream singers and poets joined after the heavy-handed police brutality came to light. American artists also began voicing support... Well over a million people marched through Paris on that day; the police stayed largely out of sight. Prime Minister Georges Pompidou personally announced the release of the prisoners and the reopening of the Sorbonne. However, the surge of strikes did not recede. Instead, the protesters became even more active. When the Sorbonne reopened, students occupied it and declared it an autonomous "people's university". Public opinion at first supported the students, but quickly turned against them after its leaders, invited to appear on national television, "behaved like irresponsible utopianists who wanted to destroy the 'consumer society.'" [b]Nonetheless, in the weeks that followed, approximately 401 popular action committees were set up in Paris and elsewhere to take up grievances against the government and French society, including the Sorbonne Occupation Committee. The students Daniel Cohn-Bendit or Alain Krivine were arising as main references by the time. Workers join the students [/b] In the following days, workers began occupying factories, starting with a sit-down strike at the Sud Aviation plant near the city of Nantes on 14 May, then another strike at a Renault parts plant near Rouen, which spread to the Renault manufacturing complexes at Flins in the Seine Valley and the Paris suburb of Boulogne-Billancourt. Workers had occupied roughly fifty factories by 16 May, and 200,000 were on strike by 17 May. That figure snowballed to two million workers on strike the following day and then ten million, or roughly two-thirds of the French workforce, on strike the following week. These strikes were not led by the union movement; on the contrary, the CGT tried to contain this spontaneous outbreak of militancy by channeling it into a struggle for higher wages and other economic demands. Workers put forward a broader, more political and more radical agenda, demanding the ousting of the government and President de Gaulle and attempting, in some cases, to run their factories. When the trade union leadership negotiated a 35% increase in the minimum wage, a 7% wage increase for other workers, and half normal pay for the time on strike with the major employers' associations, the workers occupying their factories refused to return to work and jeered their union leaders. [b]In fact, in the May '68 movement there was a lot of "anti-unionist euphoria, against the mainstream unions, the CGT, FO and CFDT, that were more willing to compromise with the powers that be than enact the will of the base.[/b] On 25 May and 26 May, the Grenelle agreements were conducted at the Ministry of Social Affairs. They provided for an increase of the minimum wage by 25% and of the average salaries by 10%. These offers were rejected, and the strike went on. The working class and top intellectuals were joining in solidarity for a major change in workers' rights. On 27 May, the meeting of the UNEF, the most outstanding of the events of May 1968, proceeded and gathered 30,000 to 50,000 people in the Stade Sebastien Charlety. The meeting was extremely militant with speakers demanding the government be overthrown and elections held. The Socialists saw an opportunity to act as a compromise between de Gaulle and the Communists. On 28 May, François Mitterrand of the Federation of the Democratic and Socialist Left declared that "there is no more state" and stated that he was ready to form a new government. He had received a surprisingly high 45% of the vote in the 1965 presidential election. On 29 May, Pierre Mendès France also stated that he was ready to form a new government; unlike Mitterrand he was willing to include the Communists. Although the Socialists did not have the Communists' ability to form large street demonstrations, they had more than 20% of the country's support. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_1968_in_France AS KEATING...HOWARD...NOW ABBOTT...AND THE MEDIA PUSHES THE ALP FURTHER AND FURTHER RIGHT...MORE AND MORE CORPORATE... YOU CAN SEE A TSUNAMI COMING. TRAGIC. N'

nasking

22/05/2013 ENUFF IS ENUFF: Some 83 per cent of the mining industry in Australia is foreign owned. And according to an Australia Institute report, 81 per cent of their profits went abroad. Take the three biggest miners in Australia: BHP, which we like to think is Australian, is in fact 76% foreign owned based on the domicile of its investors. Rio Tinto is 83% foreign owned X-Strata is 100% foreign owned. Fortescue, Twiggy Forrest’s company, is 40% foreign owned. Of the 100% Australian owned miners, foreign investment funds and companies have heavily invested in them. http://thehoopla.com.au/mining-profits-facts/ OUR LAND...BEING DUG DUG DUG... FOR THE OVERSEAS MEGA-RICH SHAREHOLDERS... WHERE IS A SOVEREIGN FUND FOR ALL AUSTRALIANS?...AN EFFECTIVE TAX??? N'

DMW

22/05/2013Hi Ken, the six 'strands' you suggest have great merit and have caused some further pondering for me. There is most likely a fine line between 3 & 4 3. Interpretation (of the facts) and possible outcomes if some policy is implemented can easily 'tip' over the line into 4. Opinion (and conjecture) The better journalists (and opinion writers) are usually careful not to cross the line too often but often commentary on those writings degenerate as gossip and vituperation are injected into discussions. I don't know how we stop the degeneration as there are more and more astro-turfers and other spinmeisters (of all persuasions) out there determined to muddy the waters so that their side benefits. Opinion pieces in newspapers have been around for a long time. I can't recall exactly when but Phillip Adams, for example, has been writing opinion pieces for going on twenty-five years. There were also the 'opinion papers' of the seventies like [i]The Nation Review [/i] and to a lesser extent [i]The National Times[/i]. Television over time created the 'celebrity journalist' such as Peach, Carlton, and Peter Harvey although mostly they reported with a pretty straight bat. Again I don't recall when it started but what has changed is with the rise of celebrity journo's has also come the practice of the straight journalist moving into the commentary and then into the opinion arena. To my mind that is part of the problem. What many people out there find difficult is to determine [i]is Clark Kent reporting the facts in today's article or is it opinion he is offering. [/i] As journalists do more and more commentary and opinion pieces it gets difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff. A challenge with consuming news on the intertubes is that unlike the physical newspaper there is not a clearly defined opinion section and the less discerning reader too easily can mistake opinion for fact because the read it on their personally respected mastheads site and it was written by their preferred celebrity journalist.

nasking

22/05/2013 THE CORPORATIONS AND THEIR PUPPETS NEVER KNOW WHEN TO STOP...THEY KEEP PUSHING AND PUSHING... DUPING, CONNING, RORTING, SUCKING US DRY, FORCING US INTO MORE AND MORE DEBT...RAPING OUR PUBLIC SERVICES... A MALIGNANT CANCER THAT INSIDIOUSLY GROWS...CONSUMES...DESTROYS...UNDERMINES...POISONS...TRICKS...ENSLAVES EVERY PART OF OUR COMMUNITIES IT CAN... CORPORATISM...THE STENCH OF FASCISM... IT PUSHES THE MOST MODERATE OF PEOPLE TO RADICAL THOUGHTS: [b]Hasta Siempre, Comandante[/b] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasta_Siempre YOU TRY SO HARD TO GET COMPROMISES... BUT THEY CAN'T HELP THEMSELVES... THE MAW MUST BE FED. N'

nasking

22/05/2013 [b]Phillip Adams, for example, has been writing opinion pieces for going on twenty-five years. There were also the 'opinion papers' of the seventies like The Nation Review and to a lesser extent The National Times[/b] LOL. DIDN'T EXACTLY STOP THE ROT...DID HE? NO LONGER EYES WIDE SHUT. N'

DMW

22/05/2013Ken @ May 21. 2013 07:24 PM wrote: [i]It's a pity more people don't understand history. I'm always amazed watching telly how little so many people know about our history, including many young journalists.[/i] Having suggested people take a look at Rob Chalmer's memoir I chose to read it again myself and this little snippet on page 51 stood out like the proverbial [i]The Chifley Government persuaded all the States to either give their powers to the Commonwealth or legislate to restore petrol rationing. The reimposition of rationing began on 15 November—25 days before the December 1949 election. As Martin says: ‘The re-imposition of petrol rationing on the eve of the election gave the opposition, especially the Country Party, an unprecedented opportunity to lure electors with a promise of abolition.’ Fadden had driven the petrol-rationing issue harder than Menzies throughout the campaign. [b]This was yet another example of the electorate being lied to and those responsible for the lie being the beneficiaries at election time.[/b][/i] My emphasis added So Menzies victory in 1949 and his subsequent long reign was in part built on a lie. I seem to recall from slightly more recent history another long serving Liberal Prime Minister gaining power by being economical with the truth. From this I shall draw a conclusion: There LNP is very good at one part of economics. They are very austere with the truth and it is in their DNA.

nasking

22/05/2013 PHILLIP ADAMS...CAREER: [b]Adams began his advertising career with Foote Cone & Belding and later with Brian Monahan and Lyle Dayman became a partner in the agency Monahan Dayman Adams. They took that company to a successful public listing and Adams became a millionaire in the process. [/b] He developed such successful campaigns as "Life – Be In It", "Slip, Slop, Slap", "Break down the Barriers", "Guess whose mum's got a Whirlpool" and "watch the big men fly for a Herbert Adams Pie", working with such talents as Fred Schepisi, Alex Stitt, Peter Best, Robin Archer and Mimmo Cozzolino. He left the advertising industry in the 1980s. Monahan Dayman Adams purchased the successful Sydney agency MoJo in 1987 and carried on as MojoMDA. Its lineage can today be traced to Publicis Mojo, an Australian subsidiary of the French multinational advertising and communications company holding Publicis Groupe. He wrote regular columns for The Age and The Bulletin. He currently writes twice weekly for The Australian. Wikipedia WOW!!! RADICAL MAN!!! [b]NOT[/b] [b]THE CON GOES ON[/b]. N'

DMW

22/05/2013nasking, I am at a complete loss in understanding the purpose of your comment @ 3:26 PM and the follow up @ 3:32 PM. [i]DIDN'T EXACTLY STOP THE ROT...DID HE?[/i] I have no understanding of the relevance to the words of mine that you quoted. What am I missing?

nasking

22/05/2013 [b]Corporatization[/b] is the process of transforming state assets, government agencies or municipal organizations into corporations. It refers to a restructuring of government and public organizations into joint-stock publicly listed companies in order to introduce corporate and business management techniques to their administration. Often the result is the creation of state-owned corporations, where the government retains majority ownership of the companies stock, but sometimes corporatization is a precursor to partial or full privatization, which almost always refers to a process by which formerly public assets or functions are sold or given to corporate entities by listing the shares of the state-owned corporation on publicly traded stock exchanges. [b]The move towards neoliberal economic reform in the 1980s led to privatization of public functions in many countries. Corporatization was seen as a half-way house on the road to privatization. [/b] The effect of corporatization has been to convert state departments into public companies and interpose commercial boards of directors between the shareholding ministers and the management of the enterprises. [b]These state-owned enterprises are organized in the same manner as private corporations, with the difference that the company's shares remain in the ownership of the state and are not traded on the stock market. Corporatization has been the policy of the People's Republic of China and has been used in New Zealand and most states of Australia in the reform of their electricity markets, as well as in many other countries and industries (e.g. Dutch water supply companies).[/b] Although corporatization is to be distinguished from privatization (the former involves publicly owned corporations, the latter privately owned ones), [b]once a service has been corporatised it is often relatively easy to privatise or part-privatise it, for example by selling some or all of the company's shares via the stock market. [/b] In some cases (e.g. the Netherlands in regard to water supply) there are laws to prevent this. Major areas [b]Some major areas of services which have been corporatized in the past include[/b]: [b]National railroads[/b], the initial impetus to corporatization of functions that had belonged to national and local governing bodies began in the sphere of national railroad construction in the mid-19th century. [b]Corporatized highways, for example toll roads. Corporatized electricity[/b]. [b]Corporatized water[/b], for example, the Dutch water supply companies are publicly owned corporations (mostly by municipalities, but also by regional governments). For involvement of private corporations in water supply, see water industry and water privatization. Wikipedia THE ROT CONTINUES... N'

Ken

22/05/2013DMW Agree entirely about the fine line between interpretation and opinion (that was a point I made in an earlier post before I broke the issue into a few more pieces). Also why I said that "opinion" is the central point around which the whole issue turns and, as you rightly point out, the blurring between these elements leave people unsure whether a columnist is providing fact, a genuine interpretation, or opinion. "Conjecture" is a good one. But like "opinion" it can either be conjecture based on existing facts, or based on peronsal opinion or gossip. To return to my original post on this, it is not a good result for democracy if the electorate is being fed opinion in the guise of interpretation. Also in total agreement about the hypocrisy of the LNP. Nasking I think the big difference with the early columnists and opinion pieces was that people knew what they were. Now, as I argue, the distinction is blurred.

Ken

22/05/2013Nasking on the 1968 Paris riots Three years after the Paris riots I was at Sydney University and in our Anthropology Honours seminars we had an older American bloke (about my age now) who had been in Paris at the time. He said they weren't just riots but the start of another French Revolution that was "put down". In the late 80s early 90s, I also heard a couple of historians refer to it as the potential birth of a revolution (but can no longer recall their names). It was a key moment in history.

nasking

22/05/2013 TONY ABBOTT'S LIBERALS AND HIS STATE MATES WANT TO TAKE US DOWN THE AMERICAN ROAD TO HEALTHCARE...INCREMENTALLY...BE SCARED...BE VERY SCARED: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Djdp8nM88hg ABBOTT LIKE HOWARD LOVES USING THAT WORD "INCREMENTALLY"... INCREMENTALLY WE GOT PENALTIES IF YOU DIDN'T JOIN PRIVATE HEALTH INSURANCE... INCREMENTALLY WE GOT REBATES FOR PRIVATE HEALTH COVER...WITHOUT MEANS-TESTING... INCREMENTALLY WE GOT ABBOTT AS HEALTH MINISTER BREAKING A ROLLED GOLD PROMISE... INCREMENTALLY WE GOT INCREASES IN PRESCRIPTION COSTS...YET WHERE WERE THE CHEAPER GENERIC MEDICINES? I COULD GO ON... N'

DMW

22/05/2013Another aside on history. I don't know if Philip Ruddock is standing for election again this year. If he isn't he would be a bit dark on the PM calling the election for the 14th Sept as it will leave him eight days short of 40 years as a MHR. He is currently the third longest serving federal politician http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Members_of_the_Australian_Parliament_who_have_served_for_at_least_30_years

nasking

22/05/2013 [b]It was a key moment in history[/b]. KEN, IT CERTAINLY WAS...HAD A BIG IMPACT ON ME AND SOME OF MY FRIENDS. WE WATCHED THE FILMS AND ENJOYED THE ART, MUSIC AND POSTERS AND PASSION FROM THAT PERIOD... EVEN THO WE CAME FROM VERY ANTI-UNION, MILITARY OBSESSED, SOMEWHAT RELIGIOUS CONSERVATIVE MIDDLE CLASS FAMILIES. N'

42 long

22/05/2013Test the corporatization theory. Private Run Prisons. Who can eventually lobby for laws that lead to more incarceration Ala USA. Why not do it with the army? That giant conglomerate could the try to start wars to improve profit and accelerate promotion.. The influence of the Military -Industrial Complex in the USA has been aligned with this activity for years. Look at the effect of the alcohol lobby in the laws of the Northern Territory with the laws on alcohol consumption being watered down and individual offenders incarcerated on "prison Farms" This already looks like a completely failed approach. Private enterprise can do anything better than Public Services. Unproven assertion but the right wingers, as I hope my hypothetical examples indicate. The mining lobby has always over-ridden government in Australia. Most of the profit goes overseas. The benefit to Australia is minimal. The multitudinous sellers of electricity don't add one bit of structure to the system, generate one kilowatt of electricity but they make more out of it than the generators of the power to put their name on the top of your bill. About time that a bit of reality rather than capitalist dogma was put into this argument by structures like the IPA which is no more than a right wing propaganda machine who still won't declare where they are funded from. The clue to who is being served is who donates to which party and who will subsequently be served. He who pays the PIPER calls the tune. It's not what abbott says he will do that matters( although you would be a fool to believe much he says. HE will do what he is told by those he is beholden to. The ones who gave him the PM job The ABC is for sale and the SBS too. Snowy hydro and eventually your water supply. American public rejected this sort of stuff. We must too. The concentration of media power in this country is only exceeded by the level in totalitarian countries. It should never have been allowed to occur.

Ken

22/05/2013Nasking Yes it was a great time, though perhaps in Dickens' words in relation to the original French Revolution, "it was the best of times, it was the worst of time". It was a time when society itself was being questioned,,when black people in Africa and America were demanding their rights, when revolution was in the air. Unlike you, I came from a working class background here in Oz and grew up with stories of Jack Lang and Red Ted Theodore, and even Michael Collins and the Irish fight for freedom. There were only a small group of us at university who came from working class backgrounds. Although our "revolution" was overwhelmed by the system, I have been disappointed with succeeding generations. They seem to have placed more emphasis on economic well-being and to have forgotten the poor and displaced. As others have said, we have become an economy not a society.

nasking

22/05/2013 [b]I think the big difference with the early columnists and opinion pieces was that people knew what they were. Now, as I argue, the distinction is blurred.[/b] INDEED KEN, THE CORPORATISATION OF THE MEDIA WHERE BARONS USE GATEKEEPERS IN LINE DOESN'T HELP... THE FEAR OF OFFENDING ADVERTISERS...LOSING AUDIENCE/READERS WHICH IN TURN LOSES ADVERTISERS... THE FEAR OF LOSING YER JOB IN HARD AND CHANGING TIMES FOR MEDIA...WITH LIMITED JOB OPPORTUNITIES...AND ONLY A LIMITED AMOUNT OF WELL PAID MEDIA JOBS...WITH ONLY SO MANY OWNERS...CAN PUT PRESSURE ON COLUMNISTS, JOURNOS, TALKING HEADS TO UNDERMINE THEIR OWN PRINCIPALS...OR GO WITH CENSORSHIP...DISTORTIONS...HYPERBOLIC HEADLINES... THE INCREASING USE OF WRITERS AND JOURNOS WHO HAVE FEW CORE VALUES... OR YOUNG INEXPERIENCED ONES WHO ARE NAIVE, UNAWARE OF VARIED HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES AND DIVERSE SOCIO-ECONOMIC SYSTEMS... ETHICALLY MALLEABLE...SO THEY CAN BE USED TO OPPORTUNISTICALLY CHOP AND CHANGE IN TABLOID FASHION TO ATTRACT VIEWERS/READERS... POTENTIALLY HOLLOW. UNDERMINING OBJECTIVITY. TRUST. THE FACTS. N'

nasking

22/05/2013 SHOULD BE: THE CORPORATISATION OF THE MEDIA WHEREIN BARONS USE GATEKEEPERS TO KEEP JOURNOS IN LINE DOESN'T HELP... *APOLOGIES...EYES REALLY FAILING ME TONITE.

Tom of Melbourne

22/05/2013Remember how a few weeks ago a couple here were speculating that the charges would be withdrawn, the case would fall apart???!! Today…19 new charges, for a total of 173! Hilarious.

Catching up

22/05/2013Maybe someone can explain why the police laid more charges against Thomson today. None of the new charges is different from those already laid. Do not throw any newe light on the matter. All the police action would do is prolong the case longer. Wonder if this is their aim. Delay any trial until after the election.

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22/05/2013Ken I like your sequence: 1. Fact 2. Explanation (of the facts) 3. Interpretation (which can be like an opinion but based on the facts) 4. Opinion (which can relate to facts and interpretation or be based on gossip) 5. Gossip (which may or may not have any relevance to fact) 6. Vituperation and invective. If we followed that, and made clear at which point in the sequence we were operating, rational dialogue might be possible.

Ken

22/05/2013Looking at the Parliamentary Budget Office report brought historical musings that it is always Labor that has to clean up the LNP mess. Curtin took over the War effort; Whitlam started the effort to get the nation off the “sheep’s back” and to educate the populace for a modern ecomony; Hawke and Keating continued the process of modernising the economy and took bold steps to do it, floating the dollar, reducing tariff walls; Gillard has had to pick up the slack in infrastructure and lack of resources for the less well-off that was inherited from the Howard years (Howard and Costello suddenly remembered infrastructure near the end when the big exporters began to complain that their exports were being delayed by poor rail connections and overcrowded and ageing port facilities). And now the PBO shows that the structural budget deficit was also inherited from Howard. The LNP are good at keeping the voters “happy” by doing nothing or, in Howard’s case, handing out money from an ephemeral boom that is not affordable when the boom turns to bust and the hand-outs have been locked into the tax system causing long term problems for the Government. Where are we now??? If I was being cynical, I could suggest that this is a deliberate strategy to ensure that Labor governments do not last as long because they are forced to make the more difficult changes that the LNP won’t.

lyn

22/05/2013Hi Catching Up 08:04 PM you have said exactly what I thought.

Tom of Melbourne

22/05/2013That MUST be the explanation - the police are in cahoots with the Liberals, because it couldn’t possibly be that Thomson has done anything wrong.

Catching up

22/05/2013I did not say that. Though nothing would surprise me n this matter. I just asked why?

nasking

22/05/2013 [b]I have been disappointed with succeeding generations. They seem to have placed more emphasis on economic well-being and to have forgotten the poor and displaced.[/b] Ken, partly due to the fact we haven't experienced hard times by way of a big economic downturn for a good long time. Fortunately. They haven't struggled like others did in the past. Young people are pretty spoilt here...well, most of them. Struggling these days seems to entail not having enuff money to buy weekend grog and grabbing the latest mobile phone. However, now the govt has gotten tuff on Newstart recipients and single Mums...not to mention refugees...add the cuts made by certain Lib state govts...and gradually we are beginning to see an austerity measures-inflicted like poverty and hardship... combine that with the gay marriage issue...and perceived cuts to higher education...the recognised greed of the banks and mining barons... and calls for reconciliation... we begin to see the establishment or revitalisation of movements...some that have lain dormant for yonks...others growing gradually evolving into more sophisticated communicators, utilising a formidable and diverse set of new and old media & hi-tech organs, tools, to effectively get their message across. I prefer it happens this way...than during a fullbore economic recession that could see the rise of a violent and vicious far-right movement based on job competition and envy...hyped and perpetuated by a grotesque media. Look to Greece, Portugal and Spain and the way the wealthy have colluded with the banks and various politicians and corporate aristocracy to pull the rug out from under many public service workers and others that has led to social division...and an increase in far-right extreme nationalist migrant and gay bashing groups. I bet some on Abbott's side would LUV that opportunity...so they could dupe the public into believing they were the SENSIBLE CENTER...whilst being permitted to move their policies further to the right. We are already having problems here in Logan...each time there is a crime the specific neighbourhood is always identified as Logan...a deliberate attempt to stereotype a massive area and population and give the impression this vast area is riddled with out of control youth...so certain right-wing councillors and an LNP state govt can introduce more business-oriented and more draconian security measures that support and enrich them, their families and their donors, major supporters. Whilst providing the media with the real and manufacturec conflict and sense of moral panic they thrive on...the larger the area, the better for them. Logan once again becomes an easy target for their mischief making and profitable social engineering projects off the back of fear-mongering and isolating and FINGERPOINTING at an entire community based on a few incidents...to be expected in such a highly populated, culturally complex area where media oft enjoys lowering morale...or motivating people to indulge in practices and entertainment that can lead to aggressive and volatile behaviours...including boxing, martial arts, drinking in hotels, blood sports including rugby, paint ball gaming, speed driving...the list goes on. N'

nasking

22/05/2013 I might add, the increasingly NEO-liberal ABC via their QLD news have worked in tandem with the usual suspect media to manufacture this increasingly negative perception of Logan... a disgraceful approach by our public broadcaster...and the latest newsreader had not improved the situation. Nor some of the authority figures here. Undermining the extensive work of many morale lifting educators, councillors, businesses and others over the last decade. SHAME! DON'T JUDGE US ALL BY THE VICIOUS ACTIONS OF A TINY MINORITY. N'

lyn

23/05/2013Today’s Links Rupert Murdoch’s journalistic cancer by @independentaus Murdoch, or his editors (but I repeat myself), decide on the format for the latest government attack. Doesn’t matter what it is — some fabricated and dishonest attack on the PM’s integrity, or a policy proposal, some poll result, some disagreement between Labor Party http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/business/media-2/rupert-murdochs-journalistic-cancer/ Are we left with the right centre? by @fakeedbutler bias everywhere among our more conservative brethren, and this makes perfect sense. After all, a defining feature of modern ‘conservative’ thought is an inherent, and deep, mistrust of institutions – primarily government and media http://ausvotes2013.com/2013/05/22/are-we-left-with-the-right-centre/ The liberties of George Brandis by @awelder Margo: After the recent George ‘free speech’ Brandis speech I asked (begged) @awelder to write me a piece on the civil liberties credentials of the man who will be AttorneyGeneral under an Abbott Government. This is Andrew’s first piece for @NoFibs. http://australiansforhonestpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/05/22/the-liberties-of-george-brandis-by-awelder/ So you think Tony Abbott’s going to lead you to the promised land? Think again! by @minkelCA Do we want a country where our assets are sold-off at bargain basement prices into private hands and we are forced to pay a premium to gain access to them again, or do we want fundamental services, local employment and control over our own future? http://theaimn.com/2013/05/22/so-you-think-tony-abbotts-going-to-lead-you-to-the-promised-land-think-again/ Tony’s Tactics by Andy Snelling Unfortunately for Mr Abbott, he may have made his own life harder in a speech that rested on emotive clichés and blatant generalisations. http://rtrfm.com.au/story/tonys-tactics/ The Culture Wars: A Second Front by Mark Latham Tony Abbott praised The Lucky Culture as a “perceptive book” and “shrewd analysis”. He raised no objection to its policy prescriptions. I have no doubt, if an Abbott Government is elected, its biggest cuts will be to the university sector – fulfilling Abbott’s 40-year obsession with http://chifley.org.au/opinion/the-culture-wars-a-second-front/ I put my money on O’Farrell by @gabriellechan On the weekend, he revealed that Tony Abbott had met him during his Cabinet deliberations to urge his fellow Liberal against a deal with Julia Gillard.“(Abbott) made clear his view that the system wasn’t broken, that the agreement shouldn’t be entered into, http://gabriellechan.com/2013/05/22/i-put-my-money-on-ofarrell/ Blame/credit: a natural affliction of all our politicians by Peter Fray @PolitiFactOz A case in point is the Half True ruling on Tony Abbott’s claim that during the Howard years, the wealth of Australians doubled. http://www.politifact.com.au/truth-o-meter/article/2013/may/22/blame-credit-when-authors-dont-control-our-destiny/ Here's to you, Martin Parkinson (lyrics) by @1petermartin Joe Hockey hung the Treasury boss Martin Parkinson out to dry today. Offered two opportunities to endorse him in the role he declined. http://www.petermartin.com.au/2013/05/heres-to-you-martin-parkinson-lyrics.html Buckle up for the Aussie dollar rollercoaster ride by @GrogsGamut Even when you get the fundamentals right the exchange rate can make a fool of you, http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4703296.html Both sides' big secret- taxes must go up, not down by @1RossGittins ask her, do the letters GST ring a bell? When you measure the burden of federal taxes as a proportion of the nation's income - as you should - Peter Costello was our highest taxing treasurer. Wayne Swan can't hold a candle to him http://www.rossgittins.com/2013/05/both-sides-big-secret-taxes-must-go-up.html A politician to whom bald-faced political lying is as natural as breathing in and breathing out by @no_filter_Yamba It would appear that the majority of Australian households and workers will lose money if a Coalition Government is elected and, Mr Abbott said more spending cuts would be announced http://northcoastvoices.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/a-politician-to-whom-bald-faced.html Joe’s Plan For The Present ‘Emergency’, Unremarked By Anyone Else by Bob Ellis It is possible that Joe is not very bright. He has redefined the word ‘emergency’ to mean ‘not being in surplus’, but he won’t say when we will be in surplus if he is in charge of the money.He says he can’t possibly predict that without getting the figures. The figures were supplied this morning. http://www.ellistabletalk.com/2013/05/22/13892/ Australia State Liberals Push for ABC, SBS Privatization by Precious Silva Victorian Liberal Party will open the motion on reviewing the conditions of ABC and SBS at the state conference this weekend. The motion will urge the federal coalition to conduct a complete "operational review" of the broadcasting companies. This will establish whether or not a partial or full privatisation is feasible. http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/469879/20130522/tony-abbott-abc-privatization-sbs-australia-liberals.htm#.UZ0qAUpArX4 Tony Abbott’s Budget Emergency? by Truth Seeker truth bender Abbott telling all his lies and half truths during his budget reply. For me though, the icing on his “Mud” (read SHIT) cake was his declaration of the “Budget Emergency” that needs to be dealt with, http://truthseekersmusings.wordpress.com/2013/05/22/tony-abbotts-budget-emergency/ Today’s front Pages Australian Newspaper Front Pages for 23 May 2013 http://www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm News headlines http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

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23/05/2013LYN'S DAILY LINKS updated: http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/page/LYNS-DAILY-LINKS.aspx

nasking

23/05/2013 WHEN DOES THE EXTREME CHRISTIAN RIGHT ACT LIKE THE EXTREME MUSLIMS AND FAIL TO SEE IT?: TONY JONES, PRESENTER: For more on the latest developments in Britain and France we're joined by our Europe correspondent Philip Williams in London. Now Phil, [b]blowing your brains out in front of tourists at the altar in Notre Dame is a pretty extreme way of protesting. Is it clear what Dominique Venner was on about[/b]? PHILIP WILLIAMS, EUROPE CORRESPONDENT: Yes, very much so because of his blogs and he posted on his blog earlier that day. [b]He'd also apparently left a suicide note which unofficially mirrored his comments and they were basically anti-Islamic and they were anti-gay marriage. [/b] Now the gay marriage legislation in France was signed into law by President Hollande just on Saturday, so it was very fresh in people's minds. It's been a very bitter debate over the last few weeks. And so he made this incredibly violent demonstration of his views in one of the most public of all places. 1,500 people witnessed this. It was a shocking event. And although what's perhaps even more shocking is some of the reaction from the far-right basically lauding his actions and that has brought condemnation from the socialist government... TONY JONES: Now we've seen some pretty violent protests in France, not so many in Britain, but [b]we have seen these isolated attacks and particularly this recent one on this editor of the gay magazine.[/b] What you can tell us about that? PHILIP WILLIAMS: Yeah. Well, look, [b]I'll just show you a photo. It's pretty horrible. And that's Chris Bryant and he is the editor of a gay and lesbian magazine here in London. He'd just finished a few hours earlier putting to bed the stories about the International Day Against Homophobia, was walking through the park with his partner late at night, just close to his home, and was set upon by about five or six people said to be in their late teens and early 20s and they were beaten up very badly, as you can see from that photo. Told to "Stay down, faggot" and those sorts of homophobic comments. [/b] And basically [b]he was arguing after that attack that this sort of debate that's been developing in Britain has allowed this homophobic atmosphere to grow where it's acceptable amongst at least a very small part of the population to attack homosexuals in public places.[/b] http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2013/s3765383.htm AND: ‘[b]Kill[/b] [b]gays for kissing’ extremist Muslim tells Manchester students Middle East studies student films meeting where extremist says God would support the stoning of gay men A Manchester student has secretly filmed an extremist Muslim saying gays should be executed. Middle East studies student Colin Cortbus was attending a meeting at the University of Manchester’s Students’ Union on 13 February. The city in north-west England is famous for its cultural diversity, big student population and thriving LGBT community. He asked others at the event, organized by the Global Aspirations of Women student group, whether God would agree to gay men being stoned to death. He was told he would. He asked if ‘in the Islamic society in which you strive for’ they would ‘feel comfortable, personally and morally, to kill a gay man?’ The chair of the meeting said: ‘Absolutely.’ She said even two gay men kissing outside the Students’ Union building would be justification for the death penalty. And if gay men were executed: ‘I wouldn’t feel remorse for that. No offence to you.’ She added: ‘It is an atrocity. In an Islamic society your basis for life is obedience to God. [Two gay people kissing] it goes against what God says.’[/b] http://www.gaystarnews.com/article/‘kill-gays-kissing’-extremist-muslim-tells-manchester-students190213 NOT HARD TO SEE WHO THE EXTREMISTS ARE EH? GOD DROVE ME TO DO IT. HMMM...AND TONY ABBOTT CATERS TO A FEW OF THE EXTREMIST LOOPS AND CALLS HIMSELF THE 'SENSIBLE CENTER'. YEA...RIGHT. N'

nasking

23/05/2013 EXTREMISTS AND THEIR GODS EH?: Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) this week said that prayers to God will ensure Obamacare’s repeal, after 37 House of Representatives attempts to do so. “I think the President will ultimately be forced to repudiate his own signature piece of legislation because the American people will demand it,” she told an evangelical radio host Tuesday. “And I think before his second term is over, we’re going to see a miracle before our eyes, I believe God is going to answer our prayers and we’ll be freed from the yoke of Obamacare.” http://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/05/22/2048161/bachmann-god-obamacare-repeal/?mobile=wt THE REST OF US GET STUCK IN THE MIDDLE...SOME CASUALTIES...OF EXTREME CHRISTIANITY AND EXTREME ISLAM... AND THE ODD CORPORATE ARISTOCRAT ENJOYS FEEDING IT...AND PROFITING. N'

nasking

23/05/2013 ABBOTT WANTS TO BE VERY CAREFUL ABOUT HIS NUDGE NUDGE WINK WINKING: Far-right official 'beats up' gay marriage activists A local councillor from France’s far-right National Front party is in hot water with police after he was accused of physically attacking three gay–rights campaigners at a rally in the Burgundy town of Auxerre. Councillor Richard Jacob, an elected member of Marine Le-Pen’s far-right party, allegedly shouted homophobic abuse at three gay-rights activists before pushing them down the steps of the Town Hall, police sources told TF1 television. One of the victims was taken to hospital with a face wound, another injured his ankle whilst a third said he was kicked in the face during the fracas, which kicked off in the middle of a demonstration in favour of gay marriage on Saturday. According to TF1 witnesses reported that Jacob started the rumpus after becoming furious at the presence of the demonstrators outside the Town Hall. The three victims have filed complaints with local police accusing Jacob of assault and using homophobic language. http://www.thelocal.fr/20130218/far-right-councillor-assaults-gay-marriage-activists#.UZ1K9csaySM LACK OF TOLERANCE AND MYOPIC VIEWS BASED ON FUNDAMENTALIST AND DISTORTED INTERPRETATIONS OF RELIGIONS CAN BE DANGEROUS. SERVES TO DIVIDE SOCIETY...AND CAN UNDERMINE TOURISM, BUSINESS. DRIVING PEOPLE AWAY. N'

nasking

23/05/2013 MORE INTOLERANCE: [b]A man is facing jail for being connected to one of several anti-gay attacks in New York City. Gornell Roman is accused of yelling homophobic remarks and attacking a gay man he had been drinking with on Monday (20 May).[/b] He was charged with assault and aggravated harassment, both as hate crimes, by police today (22 May), according