And the winner is: Rupert Murdoch

In a fair contest, Kevin Rudd and the Labor team would have been more than a match for Tony Abbott and the Coalition team. But it was not a fair contest. From the very beginning of the election campaign Rupert Murdoch marshalled his formidable forces in support of Abbott while he waged a barefaced propaganda war against Rudd and Labor. When before have we witnessed such an onslaught?

Conscripted by Murdoch from his position of editor-in-chief of The New York Post, ‘Field Marshall’ Col Allan, known inside News Corporation as ‘Col Pot’, a reference to Pol Pot, the Khmer Rouge genocidal dictator, was instructed by Murdoch to "go hard on Rudd, start from Sunday, and don't back off".


Allan soon got to work. His message to Murdoch’s editors was straightforward but brutal: “You have been going hard on Labor but now, with Rudd's revival in the opinion polls, you have to go harder.” Indeed, they had been ‘going hard’ with vicious front pages since July: Captain Chaos, Wreck it Rudd, Hellhole Solution and Rudd’s Boat Show (referring to the PNG arrangement), Kev’s $733 million Bank Heist, Price of Labor, It’s a Ruddy Mess and Rudd’s Carr Wreck, when the Budget revision was released, and Island Hell referring to Manus Island.

The attack heightened with The Daily Telegraph’s: Finally, you now have the chance to…KICK THIS MOB OUT on Monday 5 August.


As Bruce Guthrie, who had a successful legal run in with Murdoch, so well recorded in his book Man Bites Murdoch, writes in his Brisbane Times article It's on: Rudd gets the Col shoulder as Murdoch telegraphs his punches: “By Thursday he and the Telegraph editor, Paul 'Boris' Whittaker, had taken another shot at Rudd, casting him, Anthony Albanese and Craig Thomson as ''Thommo's Heroes'', playing on the late 1960s sitcom Hogan's Heroes. By Friday, it was the turn of The Courier-Mail, the Brisbane tabloid turning Rudd and star candidate Peter Beattie into circus clowns.” Guthrie questioned Rudd’s wisdom in ‘taking on’ Murdoch: “What can he expect? First off, News does not play fair. And it's not always troubled by the truth. The PM will be misquoted and misrepresented, photographed - or Photoshopped - any notion of balance abandoned.

“My case
[his Supreme Court case against Murdoch for wrongful dismissal] taught me there are two kinds of truth in this world: what happened and what News Ltd says happened. And in Murdoch's world his version trumps everything - given his clout and reach in this country, that can be a scary realisation. Rudd should also know he is not only taking on the Telegraph - he's taking on the entire Murdoch empire.”

Referring to Rudd’s strong reaction to Murdoch’s mauling of him, Guthrie concluded: “I hope for his sake he has thought it through. Because he's about to get a working-over he'll long remember. I managed to hold on to my house; I'm not sure he'll hang on to The Lodge.”

Not satisfied that his readers had got his message, Murdoch’s Sunday Telegraph shouted Australia needs Tony, with the Abbott face filling the front page. Yesterday, it was YOUR TURN under a smirking Abbott with a wistful Rudd looking on.

Murdoch’s power is profound. A Get Up ad that criticized the anti-Labor coverage of Murdoch's newspapers was banned on commercial TV for fear of upsetting him. Channels Seven and Ten refused to air the ad, while Nine screened it over four days in Brisbane – then cancelled it after blaming a "coding error".

The Murdoch threat to Labor is not new. Over a year ago I wrote: Julia Gillard can defeat Tony Abbott in 2013. But how does she neutralize Rupert Murdoch?

When in April 2012 Murdoch tweeted: @rupertmurdoch 
Dramatic, slimy events in Australian politics. Country desperately needs election to get fresh start, 
28 Apr 12, no room for doubt remained – Murdoch wanted an election and expected that it would be the end of Julia Gillard and her Government.

The piece argued that while PM Gillard needed to defeat Tony Abbott and the Coalition at the next election, that was not her most forbidding task. Her most powerful enemy was Rupert Murdoch. It was he who needed to be countered for electoral success: “Our PM has two virulent enemies, and an unequal battle with them.”

The piece went on to document how Julia Gillard was superior to Tony Abbott on every parameter, but that might count for naught against Murdoch’s forces. It concluded: “We have all known about the influence he exerts via his 70% ownership of metropolitan newspapers, and through his TV outlets here in Australia, and in recent months we have seen his pernicious influence on politics in the UK and the depths to which he will stoop for a salacious story. I expect we might see something similar in the US.

“Rupert Murdoch has always sought to influence politics in every country where his vast empire has its tentacles. He has now stated overtly what we all knew, that he wants PM Gillard and her Government out and Tony Abbott and the Coalition in, and will use all his massive media power to achieve that end. He will not ease back, he will not take the pressure off, he will, through his media, one overseen by sycophantic hirelings, wage relentless war on our PM and her Government. It is to the mainstream media’s eternal shame that so many of the others have followed the Murdoch lead.

“Julia Gillard would trounce Tony Abbott were the election to be based on competence, performance and behaviour, and an accurately informed electorate. But we know that the Murdoch factor will ensure that not only is the electorate not informed about the Government’s achievements and its plans, but that it will be deliberately misinformed through distortions, omissions, and at times downright lies.

“Julia Gillard can defeat Tony Abbott, but can she counter the Murdoch menace?”


This piece, written over a year ago, was prescient. What was predicted then has unfolded before our very eyes over the last six months. Murdoch has won the election for Abbott.

The Sun's contribution to the unexpected Conservative victory in the 1992 general election in the UK evoked a Murdochesque front page headline: "It's The Sun Wot Won It", reflecting the influence of the Murdoch press over politicians and election results, something Murdoch relishes. We may see similar sentiments expressed here, although Murdoch conceded to the Leveson Inquiry into the culture, practices and ethics of the British press following the News International phone hacking scandal, that the headline was "tasteless and wrong".

No matter how tasteless, Rudd and Labor will be exhibited as a scalp on Murdoch’s well-endowed belt.

Of course, it would be unreasonable to suggest that Murdoch alone was responsible for Labor’s defeat. Abbott himself would want to take much of the credit, and his minders and supporters inside the Coalition and in the sycophantic media would want to take their share. They insist that Abbott has succeeded brilliantly by mesmerizing the electorate for so long with his simplistic, monotonously repeated three word slogans, by continually demonizing Labor and the PM, by being consistently ‘on message’, and by being supremely ‘disciplined’ (how the media loves that term), which is code for not disastrously putting his foot in his mouth. To the Murdoch media, all Abbott had to do was not stuff up and stay on message, and it would act as his megaphone. It mattered little that Abbott never acknowledged the global fiscal situation, nor detailed how the economy would need to adjust to the new reality of a slowing resource sector, nor how he planned to manage the transition to a different economy. His success was measured only by how well he avoided missteps.

Moreover, it would be foolish for Labor supporters to ignore the contribution Labor and its leaders have made to their defeat. Mistakes have been made, errors of judgement have occurred, some policies and plans have been faulty, some strategic moves inadvisable. Like all political parties managing a vast nation through turbulent global times, Labor has found judgement difficult. Hippocrates’ famous aphorism about the practice of medicine applies equally to politics: Life is short, the art is long, the occasion fleeting, experience fallacious, and judgment difficult.

Some Labor ideas quickly evaporated: the community forum for achieving consensus about global warming, and the East Timor ‘solution’ for offshore processing. Some well thought through moves such as the ETS were frustrated by Coalition and Greens’ opposition, but eventually it was Rudd’s timidity about calling a double dissolution election on an ETS that resulted in its suspension. The Malaysian arrangement never got to be tried because of a High Court ruling, and several sound measures were blocked by the Greens and the Coalition.

But for every unsuccessful move there were many more that were spectacularly successful: the stimulus response to the GFC that saved the nation from recession, contained unemployment and kept small businesses afloat; the Building the Education Revolution that had a 97% success rate, which provided much needed school infrastructure; and the Home Insulation Program that insulated a million roofs, reduced power costs to households, and lessened power usage and pollution, are three significant examples. Yet there was trenchant criticism of all three, from Abbott and the Coalition of course, but promulgated widely by the mainstream media, particularly the Murdoch media. Tame economists such as Henry Ergas and Michael Stutchbury demeaned the stimulus package up hill and down dale. Murdoch columnists, especially in The Australian, ran a weekly column attacking the BER, headlining every small problem in what was a highly successful program, as demonstrated in three reports by businessman Brad Orgill. The same happened with the HIP. Although there were administrative problems that allowed some shonky operators to enter the industry, what the Murdoch media highlighted was the ceiling fires, actually fewer than before the HIP began, and the sad deaths of four young workers, all shown to be the result of OH&S shortcomings occasioned by careless contractors.

The result was that by design, through Murdoch’s media, these successful programs were demonized and deprecated to such an extent that even now the mere mention of the BER immediately evokes the words ‘waste and mismanagement’, and mention of the HIP brings forth talk of ‘pink batts’, which is code for bungling inefficiency, carelessness, ceiling fires and deaths. Thus two highly successful programs that brought great benefit to our nation have been given a big black mark that has so negated all their benefits that virtually no credit has accrued to the Government. And all this has been the direct result of deliberately disingenuous and deceitful Coalition propaganda, amplified by the Murdoch media.

Murdoch’s campaign to unseat the Labor Government started long ago. He has been at it for years. His latest foray, spectacularly vicious though it is, is but the finale to a long-standing and persistent strategy of demonization and denigration.

Moreover, the spectacular achievements of the Gillard Government, such as the NDIS, the Better Schools Plan (Gonski), and the rollout of the largest infrastructure project in our history, the NBN, quite deliberately have received paltry recognition and credit from the Murdoch press. When it was not criticizing, it simply ignored and effectively hid these accomplishments.

Murdoch has supported the Abbott notion that we need to return to the halcyon days of the Howard era. Abbott gazes longingly in the rear-view mirror at a golden age of rivers of gold flowing into the Treasury, tax cuts and middle class welfare, and Murdoch stands beside him.

Of course, there is no gainsaying the damaging effects that the change of leader from Kevin Rudd to Julia Gillard in 2010, the prolonged sabotage of her prime ministership by Rudd and what Kerry-Anne Walsh terms ‘Team Rudd’, and the change back to him in 2013. Labor ministers readily conceded this last night and again this morning. Had there not been this destructive behaviour, Labor would have been miles ahead, and not struggling to maintain momentum and electoral support, as has been the case for the last three years. It has had to function with the brakes on, looking continually in the rear view mirror to watch for threats to its continued existence as a coherent political party. The damage that Team Rudd has done is inestimable, and in the light of the election results, spectacularly unjustifiable. Whether Julia Gillard and her ministers would have done any better than has Kevin Rudd we shall never know, but many will express learned opinions one way or the other, even if inauthentic, even if worthless.

We now enter into a dark and uncertain place. Murdoch will be certain to get what he wants from Abbott, who will be keen to repay him for his powerful and unremitting support. 'Murdochracy' will blossom. Obsequious Abbott will pay homage to him, and to Gina Rinehart and George Pell, who will continue to be his sponsors, but only so long as he does their bidding, as weaklings do.

Even before the election, Abbott was threatening his opponents, threatening a double dissolution election if they obstructed his carbon tax repeal. He insisted he would not tolerate opposition, although he had offered nothing but opposition and obstruction for the last three years. He reacted angrily to the Greens and Labor ministers insisting they would stick to their policy positions. He insisted that he would have a mandate to do as he pleased and that Labor would be acting suicidally to resist him. His bullyboy nature protruded through the thin veneer of reasonableness with which he has covered himself throughout the election campaign. This is a foretaste of what is to come. Be very afraid, the ugliness of the Abbott persona will soon be exposed for all to see.

And as this ugliness and the nastiness emerges like an erupting volcano, Abbott will take comfort in Murdoch’s protection, which he knows will always be there so long as he complies with Murdoch’s wishes. Abbott’s moves will be given sympathetic publicity in Murdoch’s outlets. He will be given a long, long honeymoon. Now that he has chosen a winner, Murdoch will make sure he protects his own reputation as a kingmaker. Moreover, he will always do what his commercial interests dictate – they always take precedent over his ideological position. In the case of Abbott and Murdoch, ideologies coincide. Murdoch will want Abbott, whose conservative pose he applauds, to look after his commercial wellbeing by protecting his Foxtel empire from any adverse effects of the NBN. In Murdoch's vicious attacks on Rudd: it's business, Paul Sheehan assesses this hazard as follows: “Foxtel has responded to this threat by launching its own content-on-demand product, FoxtelGo, and is launching an online-only version, FoxtelPlay. Foxtel's co-parent, News Corp, is engaging in a more structural response. It wants to kill the NBN threat at its ultimate source - Kevin Rudd.”

In his piece in Public Opinion, David Rowe quotes Barry Jones, who insists that the quality of political debate has become increasingly unsophisticated, appealing to the lowest common denominator of understanding. On the role of the media, Jones says: The Murdoch papers are no longer reporting the news, but shaping it. They no longer claim objectivity but have become players, powerful advocates on policy issues: hostile to the science of climate change, harsh on refugees, indifferent to the environment, protective of the mining industry, trashing the record of the 43rd parliament, and promoting a dichotomy of uncritical praise and contemptuous loathing. Does it affect outcomes? I am sure that it does, and obviously advertisers think so. The Coalition is still playing to fear and anxiety with its rhetoric about the Australian economy being a smoking ruin due to Labor’s ‘irresponsible’ fiscal policies.”

Writing in similar vein in Are You Scared Yet? The Mugging Of The Australian Electorate in The Global Mail, Mike Seccombe gives a fascinating account of the difference between progressive and conservative brains and thinking, that will repay the reader’s attention. He uses ‘mugged’ in the sense of being ‘robbed’. He writes: “Conservatives, for example, tend to have a stronger ‘startle reflex’ in response to sudden loud noise, than [progressives] do. They exhibit stronger sympathetic-nervous-system reactions to what they perceive as threatening images. They are more inclined to feel disgust and are generally more fearful.” Referring to the 2013 federal election, Seccombe asserts: “Tony Abbott, his political allies and media claque have managed to convince a significant portion of the electorate that it has been mugged. They have done this not over a few weeks in an election campaign, but over a period of years, and in defiance of the objective evidence. What’s more they have done it, in many ways, with the complicity of the Labor government, which has shown itself to be rather worse at running the debate than at running the country.”

Barrie Cassidy plays down the Murdoch effect: “The Daily Telegraph is trying to influence people who are already savvy and interested enough to buy a newspaper in a declining market. They don't fit the lemming mentality, by and large. So newspaper campaigns are limited in impact. The six o'clock news is still more influential, and the social media gets bigger by the day.” Some would wish Cassidy’s view to be correct, but most would see it as a future prediction rather that a contemporary reality. Murdoch has already done his damage for the 2013 election, damage that is now all too clear.

Victoria Rollison though has no doubts. In An Open Letter to Journalists at News Ltd she concludes: “It’s also important for you to know that we won’t forget what you’ve done. If your boss gets his way, and you do manage to deliver Australia the most conservative, austerity obsessed, downright mean and selfish government we’ve ever had, it’s very likely most of your readers, especially those in areas like western Sydney who’ve you’ve conned most successfully, will not be very impressed with you.”

Let’s give the last word on the Murdoch effect to Mike Carlton. In his article: Lies, damned lies and Australia's future in yesterday’s SMH, Carlton refers to the appearance of Fairfax chairman Roger Corbett on the ABC's Lateline on Tuesday. Carlton writes: "Here was a media mogul and Reserve Bank board member wickedly interfering in the election", and goes on to quote him: “…to be as strongly biased as News have been in the last few months, I do think does a great damage to the credibility of press, at just the time when the press needs to be highly respected as we go through this digital transition".

Carlton comments: “You betcha. It matters not that the opinion pages of The Australian, The Daily Telegraph and Brisbane's Courier-Mail are a bottomless swamp of right-wing idiocy. So be it. Rupert Murdoch and his myrmidons are entitled to their own opinions. But they are not entitled to their own facts. When you prostitute your news columns with cant, slant and bias, as News has done so relentlessly, it is a betrayal of your readers and a trampling of every ethical principle of journalism.

“This is not surprising from the global octopus that so disgraced itself in Britain, but it is a tragedy for Australia.”


While some will dispute the Murdoch effect on this election outcome, insisting that Abbott did it, or the Coalition did it, or Labor did it to itself, in my opinion the most credible explanation of the Coalition victory is that Murdoch did it. Abbott could not have succeeded on his own merits. He needed Murdoch to do it for him.

Although he might not want to say so in public, in private Murdoch will be saying to himself: ‘It's The Telegraph Wot Won It’. I believe that’s right.

So the winner is: Rupert Murdoch.



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Ad astra

8/09/2013Folks For all who have supported the cause of Labor here for many a long day, today is a day for reflection on the substantial loss Labor sustained at the hands of the electorate yesterday. It is sad to see an accomplished government ejected so harshly by the people of Australia. Although commentators like to remind us that this was the worst vote for Labor in a hundred years, it is surprising that it was not even worse. The dire predictions of the pollsters that there would be even greater slaughter did not eventuate. No cabinet minister lost his/her seat; a junior minister, David Bradbury, lost his seat in Lindsay. As Kevin Rudd pointed out, in what sounded more like a victory speech, Labor has retained a hard core of talented people, upon which it can build. For all its faults, Labor introduced many major reforms: in education, health, infrastructure and industrial relations, but this has counted for naught in the face of the negativity and condemnation of the Coalition, amplified to a deafening level by the Fourth Estate, particularly the Murdoch media. A fair and balanced assessment by the media would have negated the Opposition’s hyperbole; instead Murdoch, aped by Fairfax and even the ABC, used a megaphone to shout it far and wide. It misrepresented, distorted, even lied, knowing the truth of the Goebbels dictum: “[i]If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.”[/i] And the people did. Most of the Fourth Estate seems oblivious to the pernicious role it has played in federal politics for years, oblivious of the way it has influenced the electorate’s views through polling, screeching headlines, commentary and ‘learned’ opinion. On the [i]Insiders[/i] panel this morning there was no mention at all of the media’s role. Of course when four journalists chat to each other, blindness to their pivotal role is perhaps not surprising. But we did hear a lot about how surprisingly ‘disciplined’ Abbott had been. In the eyes of the media, not stuffing up seems to be the simple road to success. Now we have an Abbott Government. He has just finished doing the easy part – opposition. Government will be his [i]bête noir[/i]. Skill at destroying things does not help in building them up. The depressing future we face with the vengeful yet weak Abbott at the helm is almost too awful to contemplate. Murdoch will extract his pound of flesh, as will Gina Rinehart and the miners, and George Pell. There will be plenty to write about, but have those who visit here the energy? At least for the time being, let’s take a break, draw a deep breath, and reflect on where we wish to go from here. To all of you who have so faithfully sustained [i]The Political Sword[/i] for so long, and in particular to you Lyn, enriching us as you have done with your links, a service unique in this nation’s Fifth Estate, I say a heartfelt ‘thank-you’. We have fought the good fight. It’s time to rest awhile.

Gravel

8/09/2013Ad Astra Yes, it is time to rest for a while. Nothing more can be done at this time. The msm will support abbott no matter what he does for at least 12 months. Take a break, enjoy your life and family. Will check in occasionally to see if you are back. Lyn Thank you for all your hard work. There won't be many good things to link to for a while so take it easy and enjoy.

cornlegend

8/09/2013Ad and Lyn. thanks for all the effort, the information, and the enlightening articles. Ad. I can"t agree with your last line "We have fought the good fight. It’s time to rest awhile." The fight for me just continues, unabated. I have kids and grandkids. I want a fair and just Australia. There continues to be Ashbygate, and Jacksonville, hopefully with speedy conclusions, and you can rest assured, Abbott and his bunch of Loons will provide plenty of ammunition from day 1. This battle with the right wing rabble is personal, and lifelong . I'm looking to source some Don't Blame Me, I voted Labor" stickers, which I will plaster everywhere

Fiona

8/09/2013Ad Astra, As always, thank you for and congratulations on yet another fine piece. I agree heartily with Gravel: now is the time for rest and reflection, and for both you and Lyn to enjoy your respective families and friends - but please don't be away [i]too[/i] long ...

Fiona

8/09/2013Nasking, I am so sorry to learn of your loss, and add my endorsement to all the wise and kind words that have already been sent your way. Take care of yourself.

jane

8/09/2013Good summing up, Ad astra. I don't watch [i]Insiders[/i], but had to have a chuckle at the idea that Liealot was "disciplined". But not at all surprised that they scrupulously avoided their role in elevating Liealot and his mob of incompetent crooks to government. If you can catagorise discipline as avoiding debates with Rudd, being hustled away by minders before he could plant both feet in his mouth and lying about releasing policies & costings, then I suppose he was disciplined. Me, I call it cowardly. But he is a coward, unless he is confronted by a dying man or with a gang of his toadies behind him. Oddly enough, I'm starting to feel a little upbeat. Instead of having to constantly defend Labor's achievements from Liars trolls, the boot is now on the other foot, especially if he has to negotiate with the Senate. His *ahem* "negotiating skills" will be exposed to the world. A slap in the face with with a 4 day old fish for his adoring acolytes. Rationalisations will come in thick & fast. Hopefully, that will contain the damage he's able to wreak in the country. Twitter has provided a link to a petition to lodge a complaint against News which I have posted below. I have already signed it and I expect there will be a flood of signatures. http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/complaint-against-news-corp-australia/sign.html#se

martha

8/09/2013Julian burnside tweeted yesterday to unfollow on all face books, so I deleted my whole face book, first of all thank ad astra, in the end evil will be defeated. a few tweets realy disturbed me, one was that pigs blood had been thrown over labor bunting, that knife had been pulled on labor mps sister,and that some one had followed a voter in to the both. of course no good complaining nothing will be done. so here we are trapped my children have a business but if all us labor people.could get through this I would love to see aust on its knees and unemployment and high int, rates , so hopefully we never see another liberal gov.. Our opp leader should be a new face , no swan, not shorten not Albanese I would like Jason Clare so any labor people who feel they don't want old faces please email Albanese, please, Swan cannot get the message out shorten , well, u decide, New faces young people relate to please. well folks you are in for bad time the real p,m is the man in New York. get united stop talking about what could of been and move on join the party and get us back in gov, he wants a dd let him have itI say. The stopping of funds to research is criminal the one I read about I shed tears , the research into the bionic eye, I know a family that had a blind baby last year and are pining there hopes on this, the researchers will move toscandanavia or somewhere, why would any on want to stop this. well words fail me. It seems liberals don't realy like their fellow aust, much a friend said this morning all this running around in flor jackets and in factories was orchestrated to attract those people and meeting with the rich to attract those people so here we are the people the workers stuck in the middle howard once described as the howard battler, laughable now.. but the fluro jacket set where the tools and the will be the first to lose their jobs as people stop spending, we all get promotional emails I have unsubscribed from all and emails them before clicking unsub.and told them I will not be spending , think about it, let big business know we will not be spending yes this will cause pain to some people employed but I am in no mood to be nice, labor people are to nice we can remain caring to each other an help in the soup kitchens yet to meet a lib who voluntees for anything,, but I am going to stop spending, I make all my own clothes and have big stock of fabric I have bought from the usa , and will sew for my daughters we grow all own vegies and have chooks,, so big business we are holding on to our money sorry, its the only way to make them stand up for us, my super fund would not explain the PPL re super and our franking to me said it was ,so guess what the super went in the bank vote with your feet think about. stop spending you may be next to lose your job our family have business so I told the the girls if some one leave do replace them, even if I have to work for free some days we lost a home in the 80 when the libs went on cutting sprees in the late 70, and it, rates went to double figures, we where thinking of a holiday but not now, poor tasmnia is about to lose its heritiage status this will do great harm not only the environment but the tourist ind, what madness is that, why do that well only he know,. talk again some time

nasking

8/09/2013 A most excellent and insightful post Ad...providing powerful quotes to support your case. Murdoch and his grotesque propaganda machine have once again played an integral role in undermining democracy and bringing down a generally effective and visionary government that did not cater to his every whim...commentators in their kowtowing, fear-driven ways can ignore the impact of his pernicious influence on politics...and his papers' sledgehammer approach to attacking the Labor party and its leaders...but we know the truth. One only has to observe the ABC bending over backwards at times to accommodate some of his staff...the promotion of his papers, political cartoonists, headlines and front pages to know this man Rupert has massive influence. [quote]On the Insiders panel this morning there was no mention at all of the media’s role. Of course when four journalists chat to each other, blindness to their pivotal role is perhaps not surprising. But we did hear a lot about how surprisingly ‘disciplined’ Abbott had been. In the eyes of the media, not stuffing up seems to be the simple road to success. [/quote] Indeed. It is something to behold...denial...and simplistic views. Not differing much from the MSM's view of global warming...the insulation scheme and BER, as you aptly remind us. Certainly the Rudd and Gillard governments had their problems and stumbles as you have fairly pointed out...but no more than the Howard government in its first six years...yet Howard managed to survive. The Howard government rarely had to deal with a sustained attack by the bulk of the media...certainly not one that lasted nigh on five years. I give credit to the ALP for managing to win the second election considering the bombardment they had to cope with...Julia Gillard's successful and artful out-negotiating of the petulant, desperate Abbott was something to behold. As was her misogyny speech. It was Abbott's recent dismissal of Julie Bishop's passionate and heartfelt views on funding for overseas aid...and last night keeping his family at bay - daughters dressed in conformist, virginal white - whilst arrogantly delivering one of the coldest speeches I've ever observed that brought to mind Julia's impactful speech. The REAL ABBOTT cometh. And Murdoch's empire will only be able to keep up the facade for so long. Crap is crap... eventually it rises to the surface...the stench and ugly look evident for all to see.

cornlegend

8/09/2013Murdoch claims victory for the Daily Telegraph. he tweets @rupertmurdoch "Tele wot won it"! No, Australians just sick of Gillard'-Rudd incompetence and infighting wrecking great county. 11:28 PM - 7 Sep 2013

Fiona

8/09/2013Nasking, I am so sorry to learn of your loss, and add my endorsement to all the wise and kind words that have already been sent your way. Take care of yourself.

lol!

8/09/2013Sorry guys things didn't work out your way, but you can't blame Rupert or the media for the events that took place yesterday. Australians are a pretty smart lot and don't need the media to tell them when a government is rotten to the core. The ALP has to take a long hard look at itself and repair what is wrong with it, they can't fix what is wrong until they face up to what they have done. The 'TRUTH' will always prevail. Interesting times ahead as the truth of Labors heart will be revealed and unless you all open your eyes to it you won't see it, but carry on it's not the end of the world only a change of Government. History will be the Judge of these characters you so admire. Have a nice day.

Casablanca

8/09/2013Dear Ad Astra, I will read your new piece later but I have read your comment. I agree that we should 'rest awhile'. Kerry O'Brien when he signed off last night said that the sun would still come up today but it would be shining on Tony Abbott (or WTTE). It was a confirmation of the strength of our democracy that we can move seamlessly to a new government. In that same sense, the sun is also shining on the supporters of Labor - it is just that it is having to peep out from behind some clouds: those clouds will clear again. With the clarity that comes from the morning after, it is obvious that Abbott has failed to deliver the killer blow that he desired. Labor's defeat was far from being the wipeout that the persistent and pernicious polls predicted. Labor, happily, has a firm foundation on which to re-build. The composition of the Senate should present some novel challenges for Abbott. He will bleat, of course, that he has a mandate to abolish the carbon price. However, no one outside his own party concedes that he has gained a mandate. We can point to Abbott's past inconsistency in this matter at both a practical and philosophical level. I favour Anthony Albanese for the leadership. He is a good performer in the House but more importantly he has displayed a loyalty and impartiality in the bun fight between the Rudd and the Gillard factions. He professed to being a Ruddite but nonetheless gave faithful service to Gillard. He put the Party first and personal politics last. Finally, a heartfelt thank you for your unstinting work in researching and writing such a body of thought provoking pieces. I few night's ago I accidently opened up your first post and if I recall correctly, it was in early September 2008. So, it has been 5 years of unstinting work on our behalf. I echo your praise of Lyn's Links. They have been invaluable. Have a good break. Before too long all Swordsters must gather and re-group to shape the future of the Fifth Estate and turn it into an even more forceful voice for political discourse.

Fiona

8/09/2013I would also like to thank almost everyone at The [i]Political Sword [/i]for their hard work in so many fields, and most particularly for their passion for and commitment to social justice. I'm proud to be (if only occasionally) here with you.

Casablanca

8/09/2013cornlegend, [quote]@rupertmurdoch "Tele wot won it"! No, Australians just sick of Gillard'-Rudd incompetence and infighting wrecking great county. 11:28 PM - 7 Sep 2013[/quote] Maybe we should dub Abbott the Assistant Prime Minister and Rupert the Prime Minister of this antipodean Murdochrachy.

janice

8/09/2013Ad astra, thank you for your excellent piece. Labor lost the election yesterday but, IMO, not as heavy a loss as that we experienced in June when we lost PMJG and a generation of ministerial talent as well. It is also only my own opinion, but Labor goes into opposition with enough bricks and mortar to rebuild itself fairly quickly, and I know in my heart that this isn't because of Rudd but in spite of him. It is to be hoped that as he has already stood down from the leadership, that he will also have the good grace to get the hell out of parliament and be reluctant to show his face in public again. I do hope that after enough rest and relaxation you will continue with The Political Sword. I, for one, will understand though if this doesn't happen. Many thanks to Lyn Tweety-Bird and all commenters who have contributed to making this site such a pleasant place to visit. Cheers

Fiona

8/09/2013Casablanca, Nah, Mr Abbott is the PM and Mr Murdoch the KING of Murdocharchy (an unconstitutional monarchy).

nasking

8/09/2013 Cheers Fiona, I have dropped by your most effective blog a couple of times of late for a read. Keep up the good work...and insightful posts and comments. It has been a difficult time of late...knowing of my Mum's impending death yet being unable to do all that I wish I could for her. Broken families sadly create many complexities and unresolved problems that can leave both parents and children with trauma and scars that does not permit them to build the bridges they sometimes desire. Particularly when mental illness in various participants adds to the complexities. I also kept to myself my Dad's cancer and the painful treatment he had to undergo the last few months...the fact he lives overseas and I could only deal with him on the phone or by email made things difficult...suffice to say, it all put my head in a spin...worsened my anxiety and OCD levels...add the eye problems and the frustration with politics and you got a very volatile blog contributor. Apologies...this blog deserved better...as did the election campaign. Once I've rested I hope to make more positive contributions. As for the ALP...I hope it does not eat itself alive,,,plenty of good things were achieved...but it does need to recognise that it needs to create a wider base...and the obsession by some old guard with Bill Shorten has caused problems... the public are far less tolerant of a politician's involvement in knifings of PMs that some of the party elders. As a Green Laborite tho I will leave the discussion of a new Labor leader and deputy to the True Believers. I am thrilled that some of my fave ALPers survived the storm...including Jason Clare, Melissa Parke, Michelle Rowland (what a fighter!), Jim Chalmers...and Graham Perrett. Also pleased for Adam Bandt and Andrew Wilkie. Really feel for Yvette D'ath (lovely lady), Dick Adams, Deb O'Neil (she'll be back) and the others who lost their seats. Already tho I can feel the rebuilding...the passion surging in supporters. Starting with Ad astras marvellous post. Abbott and Murdoch will not get a free ride...from the Fifth Estate. Moving...forward... N'

Ad astra

8/09/2013Gravel Thank you for your kind remarks. The rest will be good for all of us. cornlegend I agree we must fight on, but there is time for a break. Also, we need to work out how best to carry on the fight for Labor values. Fiona Thank you for your encouragement. After a break, we will work out how to proceed. jane Thank you for your kind comment and your insightful analysis of the Abbott man. I have signed the petition and hope others who visit here will do so too. http://www.gopetition.com/petitions/complaint-against-news-corp-australia/sign.html#se martha You make many good points. I too hope Labor thinks very carefully about its next leader.

Ad astra

8/09/2013nasking Thank you for your generous remarks and your thoughtful comments, so aptly summarized with your words: “[i]The REAL ABBOTT cometh. 

 And Murdoch's empire will only be able to keep up the facade for so long.
 Crap is crap...

eventually it rises to the surface...the stench and ugly look evident for all to see.
”[/i]

Bilko

8/09/2013AA you must have been reading my mind and have put mine and others thoughts into your fine post today, to start off a new era. Last night I rewatched the "Fellowship of the Rings" there was no way I was watching the ABC live but I did copy it however it will remain unwatched for a while. Whilst the characters in the movie had their moments of despair as actors they move on, not real but for us here it is real. Thank god I ditched Foxtel two months ago, no papers being bought since December just the internet. My prayers each week for a labor win had no effect and my $50 dollar bet went down the gurgler. One last hope is that I will get the NBN before murdoch's puppets scrap the whole thing. Well done fellow swordsters may the force be with us all. AMEN

BSA Bob

8/09/2013Oh yes, it was Murdoch wot won it, as his outlets set the agenda for almost everyone else. There'll be some celebrations behind closed doors as the real winners congratulate each other. Ad, Lyn & others, thanks for a great site. Best wishes for the future.

Ad astra

8/09/2013cornlegend Thank you for the Rupert Murdoch tweet, which says it all: “[i]@rupertmurdoch "Tele wot won it"! No, Australians just sick of Gillard'-Rudd incompetence and infighting wrecking great county.
11:28 PM - 7 Sep 2013”[/i]. He must have been reading my mind – spooky! Casablanca I know you are being whimsical, but what you write is close to the stark reality of a Murdochracy. He will be the surrogate PM. Bilko Thank you for your kind comments. I believe there are telepathic communications going on between Swordsters. BSA Bob Thank you for your comment. I’m sure there will be lots of champagne still flowing in News Limited, and a bonus cheque for Murdoch’s obedient minions.

Misst

8/09/2013And thank you Ad Astra, Lyn, and everyone on this forum for all your friendship and hard work over the past months. I'll probably have a break but not for too long I fear. Going to need an outlet for my anger. I did hear that after all their hard work in supporting Abbott the ABC was shut out from his acceptance speech. Maybe we should all send our sympathy?

N'ellie May

8/09/2013Dear Ad, Thank you for your latest post. Once again you have put so much effort and thought into your writing for us all. After all these years it certainly is time to rest awhile. Today I am not broken-hearted. I was totally blown away in June when PM J Gillard was deposed. I think a lot of my passion was destroyed but it is time to get back to business for me now and support the Labor movement. I am sure that we will re-build and go on to better things. We all know that Labor is the party of social reform and every advance is a slow process. We have our state elections to work for now in a little over 12 months and it's important to maintain our dignity and integrity. On a brighter note my local member, Mark Dreyfus, was re-elected. He is a worthy, principled person who well deserves our support. Perhaps a possible future leader? Nasking, My deepest sympathy on your loss. I know what it's like to lose a parent so my thoughts are with you and your family at this very sad time. Best wishes to all my friends and my sincere thanks to you, Ad Astra for the enormous volume of work. Also to Lyn, words cannot express my gratitude to you both.

42 long

8/09/2013I've done the petition. People who reckon the papers have no effect are taking us for MUGS. Clive spent big on advertising and look what it bought him. IF it works for Clive why doesn't it work for Murderoch. Pull the other leg. What a stacked deck for Q&A tomorrow. Tanya with a bunch of baddies. We need to contact her and encourage her. Pretending that scumbag RICHO is something to do with Labor should stop. He is a turncoat doing it for Guess what!MONEY. Never misses an opportunity to discredit the party he used to belong to.

Curi-Oz

8/09/2013Thank you, to everyone here at TPS. You have educated me and provided me links that have enabled me to converse with others in a more knowledgeable fashion with actual facts (the inconvenient ones that are not opinions, that is). Not quite sure what I'm going to be doing next, but I look forward to being enlightened, entertained and educated when every one has taken stock and is ready for the next step. Regards,

42 long

8/09/2013I WOULD'T GO OUT OF MY WAY TO PROMOTE wILKIE. Gillard did everything possible for him and he never stopped bagging her when he didn't get everything he wanted. I think the swing in Victoria against Labor (which surprised me)may have been an anti Rudd thing. Rudd should quit politics. He is damaged material and has done incalculable damage to brand Labor The GREENS have lost a lot especially in Tasmania. I think they have a GUN(N) problem down there. Tassie seems to be getting spoiled more and more. Mining is a very damaging activity to the environment. With the m monk mining will be open slather. I think society will be very divided by the actions of the barbarian. Don't like the people he is friendly with. They are all too greedy and don't care about AGW When the earth is almost uninhabitable they will just run the airconditioners higher.

Fiona

8/09/2013Curi-Oz, If you are interested - and if Ad Astra will forgive the advertisement - there is a little site known as The Pub: http://pbxmastragics.com/ You are more than welcome to hang out there - and the first drink (not necessarily alcoholic) is on the house. The same invitation is extended to all Swordsters while Ad Astra and Lyn have a more than thoroughly deserved well-earned rest.

Casablanca

8/09/2013AA, In as much as you have been commenting on individual posts above, incl mine at 1.39, I hope that you saw my thanks (plus a couple of comments) at 01:27 PM.

Ad astra

8/09/2013Casablanca Thank you for drawing my attention to your 1.27 PM post, which I saw, but which somehow I missed reading in the midst of getting lunch for the kids. Apologies. Thank you so much for your very kind comments and your words of thanks. Thank you too for filling in for Lyn while she takes a break. Your links and Janet’s are invaluable. You are a great asset to [i]TPS[/i]. Like you, I hope Labor gets its selection of a new leader right. I like Albo.

Ad astra

8/09/2013Folks I'll be out for a couple of hours. Then I'll catch up with your comments.

Patriciawa

8/09/2013Thank you for yet another powerful commentary on the harm done to our democracy by Rupert Murdoch. Ad Astra,your good fight against Murdoch has been fought for many years. You and Lyn have together made a major contribution in the struggle against what John Pilger called the world's first Murdochracy. http://www.newstatesman.com/international-politics/2010/03/pilger-australia-murdoch-media. Take a rest by all means, you both deserve it. But please come back and carry on that struggle. We need you! Your many posts and comments and those of others like Mr. Denmore, Margo Kingston, Greg Jericho and Michael Taylor, have kept alive the issue of the dangerous domination of Australian media by Rupert Murdoch. We need that commentary to continue even more vociferously now that Murdoch has indeed seemed to have had this major win. We need powerful writers like yourselves to continue asking the Australian public as Mr. Denmore did so recently [b]"when did we sit back in Australia and decide to let a US citizen who presides over an organisation that hacks phones, promotes illegal wars and trashes corporate governance to promote regime change and run our democracy by remote?" [/b] http://thefailedestate.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/damned-lies-and-journalism.html.

uriah

8/09/2013AA, Firstly,I would like to thank yourself and Lyn for your wonderful contributions and all others at TPS for the same. Once again you have written a succinct appraisal,of what has occurred,in the lead up to the election.I very much enjoy your articles. My take-Yes all that you say above,about the media influence on the election is true.However the ALP cannot blame the enemy,for having more cannon,troops and logistics.Faced with such a daunting task,there is only one way-Unite and face the enemy as one and fight to the death.Instead Rudd put himself ahead of the party and the best interests of the Australian people,first by leaking to the enemy before the 2010 election and then by whiteanting the legitimate leader,in Julia Gillard for the next three years.This has resulted in the loss of JG,Combe and other great contributors to Australian Public life and denied Australia the benefit of socially progressive policy for many years to come.Worse still JG spent her incumbency working hard to deliver such policy. This election was effectively lost on 26/6/2013,when many of Julia Gillards captains deserted their General,in the sight of the enemy-unforgivable.As a result Australia will lose the majority(what survives will be diluted) of the great polcies that JG worked so hard to achieve. Also,as hard as it is for all of us to say,we must congratulate Tony Abbott and the Coalition on their victory.Australia is a great Democracy and as such we must support our laws and conventions vigilantly. Thanks again Ad,Lyn and all,we will need your wisdom in the future as we all know the victors write the history and any policy put forward by the LNP,however odious,will be supported by their media machine.The struggle continues. Long live The Australian Labor Party.

Lucy

8/09/2013Hi Ad Astra and everyone who posts here. Wide Bay has another 3 years of Truss, that's if Barnaby doesn't take him on. Great experience for me and my intention is to try again and build up the Labor profile. Lots of disaffected voters and I doubt the PUP party will satisfy their disaffection......Lucy

Lucy

8/09/2013Ad really great post and spot on the money.

Fiona

8/09/2013Lucy, Much better luck next time.

2353

8/09/2013Nas - sorry to read about your Mother. I hope that both she and you find peace at last. Lucy - a really game effort - well done. AA - it is a reality that sites like this have evolved to be the main form of critical comment on the actions of Abbott and Murdoch. Unfortunately there is going to be a need for this work to continue. As I'm typing this, the local commercial TV news is on. Apparently the national swing to the LNP was in in the order of 3.4%, the swing in Queensland was 1.5% - which is credited to Rudd's influence in his home state. I'm not so sure - I know there is still considerable anger at Newman for the past 18 months (job losses in the Public Service have lead to parts of Brisbane City looking like a ghost town - with the subsequent loos of private industry jobs, lack of confidence in the future etc). While Rudd was probably more popular here, there was a considerable feeling that people made a decision to get rid of the mob they knew at the state election and put in the unknowns that might make a difference - and they feel that decision has come back to bite them. A few people have told me that they made that decision and weren't going make the same mistake again.

42 long

8/09/2013Warren Truss What an inspiration. I was wondering how you went LiR

martha

8/09/2013i got over Julia leaving very quickly she new the numbers she did not have to call a spill never understood why she did that. sat is like a grieving i am going to have to through for years the loss of so many wonderful policies like caring for children with disability and now the lowering of wages for nursing staff in nursing homes the loss of research , and many other things.

martha

8/09/2013was just talking to my wonderful labor son who told us to sit back watch and enjoy the un ravelling of abbott

martha

8/09/2013was just talking to my wonderful labor son who told us to sit back watch and enjoy the un ravelling of abbott also the comment by Kerry ob brien i took it a different way i think he may have meant that the sun comes up tomorrow you know the saying but then u may be correct did he mean that every one will now be watch pm rabbott, ??

Ken

8/09/2013Lucy You may have lost in what is a safe Nationals seat, but I think congratulations are in order, because on the figures I've seen you did gain a swing to Labor in the order of 3%. Well done. Next time you may get a seat with a better chance of getting over the line. Ad and others A couple of comments on the election. The swing to the LNP in Vic was bigger than in other States but that was expected because Labor had done extremely well there in the past couple of elections - someone even commented that the three seats lost there were "natural" Liberal seats that had just returned after a couple of good outcomes for Labor. Western Sydney wasn't quite the disaster predicted (at least predicted by Murdoch lackeys) which justifies, I think, the optimism I held for the common sense of my birthplace - I have posted a number of times previously about my view of the westies' politics. In that regard, the Murdoch influence may not have been as strong as first appears (although I have no quibbles with Ad's comments about the relentless negativity and ignoring completely any achievements of Labor). Queensland was the ALP's hope: one of the reasons some returned to Rudd. They thought they could offset losses in Vic and NSW by picking up seats in Qld - didn't quite happen, but interesting that the LNP in Qld also lost votes to Palmer. To all Agree with comments about the Sword community. I enjoy it here and the virtual company we keep. A short break is in order but I think we will have a lot to do in the coming years, reminding all of what they are missing, of how Australia is becoming an international pariah under the leadership of PM Abbott and foreign Minister Bishop (how will they handle the Chair of the National Security Council over the next few weeks??). We will need to remind all who visit (not the regulars) that Abbott's way is not the only way, that there are other ways that are fairer to all. I won't go on but you get the picture.

Gordonwa

8/09/2013Hi Ad, Congratulations on another tremendous article that captures the essence of Murdoch's manipulations. Your observations are spot on. I've tweeted it. Independent Australia also has a good article on Murdoch's manipulations http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/politics/the-art-of-political-assassination/ You and Lyn deserve a break but we need you back as soon as you are refreshed. Bilko, I loved your comment as my partner and I also watched The Fellowship of the Ring last night in preference to the election coverage. Lucy, congratulations on your campaign. Truss is a do-nothing seat warmer and the Nats capitulated to the Libs cutting funds for regions without a whimper. The MSM also ignored this.

nasking

8/09/2013 2353, N'ellie May, thnx for the kind words. Leigh Sales seemed very pleased with herself tonight in white. I note she did not question Julie Bishop about the massive overseas aid cuts. Seeing that loon Minchin speaking for the Abbott group tonight told me a great deal. This country is headed into darkness.

nasking

8/09/2013 Nick Minchin [b]Minchin has been a strong proponent of privatisation and wholesale labour market deregulation. He has defended the full privatisation of Telstra, and argued that the Commonwealth should sell its Telstra shares to buy a portfolio of other income-earning investments rather than spend the profits on national infrastructure.[/b] [b]In March 2006, Minchin received extensive media coverage when he highlighted the dilemma his government faced in the field of industrial relations and aired his views about future policy proposals. Speaking at a conference of the H. R. Nicholls Society where he told the audience that the coalition "knew its reform to WorkChoices were not popular but the process of change must continue", and that "there is still a long way to go... awards, the IR commission, all the rest of it..." [/b] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Minchin For the Abbott Liberals to have chosen Nick Minchin to speak for them on 7:30 tonight tells us the Abbott coalition are not what they tell the public. This would have been more than an anti-carbon price message to their business supporters.

Ad astra

8/09/2013Casablanca I’m back from visiting some of our family. I’ve re-read your 1.27 PM comment, and agree that the election outcome could have been much worse for Labor. The killer blow that pugilistic Abbott wanted to deliver, leaving Labor bloodied on the canvas, missed its mark. Labor’s key frontbenchers remain in place, leaving a hard core of talented people upon which to rebuild the party. I’m pleased Kevin Rudd will not contest leadership. What we need is for him to distance himself and not interfere with the leadership group. If he can’t resist interfering, if he can’t resist sabotaging, he should leave parliament. I just hope he has it within himself to stand well back and not interfere. As far as leadership is concerned, the one who impresses me most is Albo. I agree with your assessment. He is fiercely loyal Labor man; he disagreed with Kevin Rudd’s initial removal and remained loyal to him to the extent of voting for him in the first Rudd/Gillard leadership contest. Yet when she won, he remained fiercely loyal to her until the very end when he supported Rudd’s return. He seems a decent and principled man who had the confidence of both Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard, and supported each in turn. I regard him as the best debater Labor has. He was able easily to counter Abbott in his numerous motions to suspend standing orders. His style and turn of phrase are great assets. He could beat Abbott any time. I see him asking penetrating questions during QT. I have less confidence in Bill Shorten’s oratory. He seems less well equipped with words and turn of phrase. He doesn’t have the presence of Albo. I feel he needs more experience in leadership before taking the top job. He would be better in a senior portfolio for the time being. Chris Bowen is a good speaker, a convincing one, but I feel he would be better to stick to Shadow Treasurer, where lucid speaking is also necessary. Personally I would prefer to see a younger person as Deputy Opposition Leader, such as Jason Clare or Tanya Plibersek. You are right – [i]TPS[/i] will be five years old on September 13. It’s been a long and rewarding ride, but now is a good time to review where we go from here.

Ad astra

8/09/2013Patriciawa Thank you for your kind comments and the link to John Pilger’s [i]NewStatesman[/i] article. This paragraph depicts its flavour: “[i]What is a murdochracy? It is where the fealty and augmentation of Murdoch's editors and managers are undisguised, an inspiration to his choir on seven continents, where even his competitors sing along and wise politicians heed the Murdochism: "What'll it be? A headline a day or a bucket of shit a day?"[/i] It’s a good read http://www.newstatesman.com/international-politics/2010/03/pilger-australia-murdoch-media Mr Denmore’s [i]Damned Lies and Journalism[/i] is another fine exposition on the Murdoch effect. Thank you for reminding us all. http://thefailedestate.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/damned-lies-and-journalism.html

Ad astra

8/09/20132353 Thank you for your complimentary remarks. Ages ago, in one of my pieces, I wrote about the effect of unpopular State governments on federal political elections. We see this in this election. An unpopular LNP government in Queensland reduced the decline in Labor’s vote yesterday in Queensland, while the unpopular Labor/Greens government in Tasmania has translated into a poorer vote for Labor there. martha The unraveling of Tony Abbott is something we can sit back and enjoy. Unfortunately, our nation will be the victim of Abbott’s ineptitude. Ken Thank you for your comment. You make an interesting comment about Victoria. You may be right – we are seeing a rebalancing of the Liberal/Labor ratio. Let’s see how we feel after a break from blogging. I’m glad you enjoy the community of bloggers that frequent this site.

Ad astra

8/09/2013janice I seem to be lagging in responding to comments today. Thank you for yours – it’s always a joy to see your Gravatar, and thank you for your complimentary remarks. Like you, I feel less upset about Labor’s loss yesterday than the loss of Julia. Hopefully, because it was not as bad as anticipated, rebuilding will be more manageable. Misst Thank you for your good wishes and thanks. Let’s see how we all feel after a break. N’ellie May Thank you for your kind remarks. I share your feelings about Julia Gillard. But now is the time to rebuild. “[i]On a brighter note my local member, Mark Dreyfus, was re-elected. He is a worthy, principled person who well deserves our support. Perhaps a possible future leader?”[/i] I like Mark, but he may be too gentlemanly to be a political leader! Curi-Oz Thank you for your complimentary remarks – I’m glad you find the site educational.

Ad astra

8/09/2013Lucy It’s good to see you back after your foray into federal politics in Wide Bay. I know Warren Truss was returned, but how did you fare? When you have the final figures we would be pleased to see them. Congratulations on having the courage to take him on. Next time will be better for you as you build up your profile. Thank you for your kind comments. I’m glad you enjoyed the piece. Gordonwa Thank your for your generous remarks and for re-tweeting the piece. The piece has been well received – it has struck a respondent chord in many. Murdochracy is alive and all too well, and is recognised by many.

Catchung up

8/09/2013I would not count on taking too long a break. This, boat, that is the Abbott government will be making dangerous waves quickly. If we have learnt anything in the last six or more years, one cannot allow lies and misinformation about Labor, being entrenched in the community, as in the past. Every lie has to do dealt with as they arise. History has shown, as Gillard did not addressed she the allegations made, claiming it was tax, when it was not. It thorn became the perception she lied, which no amount of explanation could change. As much as we all love to rest, I feel that events will quickly bring us back to the fold.

jane

8/09/2013Ad astra, reading your comments and the comments by all the other Swordsters above has given me hope & heart, coupled with the knowledge that despite Turdoch headlines pronouncing a landslide, it's more like a 1 bucket sandcastle being kicked over. Despite Turdoch's triumphalism, he really can't do much to Labor now, because like it or not the spotlight is now focused on Liealot & his fellow incompetents. They're in government now and they can't come out with a couple of 3 word slogans, badmouth Labor and run away when questions are asked. Even if they agree to an interview on 7.30 or some other program, they're going to have to front up with policies to discuss. And they're going to be hit with "The LOTO says......" And the LOTO will be able to trot out the 3 worders and sneer at their incompetence and ineptitude, but of course speaking with authority because they've done the job. I'm really going to enjoy watching the unraveling especially as Rupert won't be able to do a blind thing! BTW Lucy congratulations on achieving a 3% swing. I'm very glad that you're going to keep going. Truss is a complete waste of space.

Ad astra

8/09/2013lol! Thank you for your comment. I agree it’s not the end of the world. Labor has to reform, and reform it will. 42 long I agree with your assessment of Abbott’s mates: “[i]When the earth is almost uninhabitable they will just run the air conditioners higher.[/i] uriah Thank you for your kind words. I agree that much of the turmoil in Labor can be laid at the feet of Kevin Rudd. I hope we really have seen the end of his corrosive influence. I agree with your words: “[i]…we all know the victors write the history, and any policy put forward by the LNP, however odious, will be supported by their media machine. The struggle continues. Long live The Australian Labor Party.”[/i] Catching Up Let’s see how we go taking a break. I agree with your comment: “[i]If we have learnt anything in the last six or more years, one cannot allow lies and misinformation about Labor, being entrenched in the community, as in the past.”[/i] jane I’m glad [i]TPS[/i] has given your heart. That is what we set out to achieve. Like you: “[i]I'm really going to enjoy watching the unraveling especially as Rupert won't be able to do a blind thing!”[/i] Folks, I'm calling it a day.

martha

8/09/2013well Rupert cannot hide the 12 th gov workers losing jobs and the spouses make 24 th and if children many more so the boats keep coming one came today so he cannot stop the boats, lets laugh at them . labor opp will be very effective we don't do slogans and motions of no confidence and wanting to stop question time daily, so it will be different. not that I think I can watch I am yet to look at him for some weeks now, he makes my very being turn cold , so its strict instructions in our home hubby says if he is watching the new I disappear do chores and that out it will stay. o I would love to see Jason Clare as opp, leader new faces is whats needed and 2 strong males staring back at him over the despatch box what worries me also is the health and welfare of the sick and our children re education. I hope the dd happens and we are rid of him

Bilko

9/09/2013Gordonwa @07:57 PM I am not a tolkin fan but the grandkids have the full DVD blue ray set. I found the fellowship a bit slow but I have been assured that it livens up in parts 2 & 3 so they are on this weeks to watch list. I trust you enjoyed your view. Then I have enough DVD's at one a day to pass the 3yr leiberal yawn period on the treasury and if that continues I can always loop through them again. From your pen name I assume you are in the West, my eldest grandson was there recently loved it and would love a job transfer. I have only been to Perth once for 4 days during Hawkies PMship I was also impressed but have not been able to get back for a better visit. Well come to the Swordsters site may you visit more often.

TalkTurkey

9/09/2013Comrades All, First Nasking, my condolences on the death of your mother, a trauma to which many Swordsters including myself can relate personally. The comforting thing is the sure knowledge that she is at peace. Ad astra your undaunted attitude is inspirational and your comments on comments, the sheer volume of them and the care with which you answer so very many contributors is marvellous to me. You make us all feel [i]special[/i] - enhanced, ennobled, enlightened, encouraged. Around Crispmess 2011 I personally proclaimed you [i]Webmaster of the Era[/i], and I have never had the slightest reason to doubt that. For the very-nearly 3 years I have been writing here you have been our guiding light, " ... constant as the Northern Star, Upon whose true-fixed and unbending quality There is no fellow in the firmament." [That was The Bard putting (probably-unfair!) words into the mouth of the shortly-to-be-knifed Julius Caesar - speaking of himself.] Your chosen nom de plume is just so apt! - There is a quirky delight to the rest of us, that while the words to you just mean the ultimately-aspirational "to the star", that it turns out that [i]you are[/i] our star. You have actually [i]made[/i] it, Mon Capitaine! An unfading star too, because every word of yours is immortally archived right here! You and Lynnie - what a combo! I have said it before but at this watershed moment - the [i]end of that Era[/i] btw! - it has never been clearer just how importantly you Ad have been the bar-setter for calm articulate intellectual analysis of current events, questioner and humanistic commentator. And btw Comrades, just to note, we Swordsters see only a tiny proportion of your huge life! And Lyn, as we all know, you have developed along with Ad's blog what has resulted in great Fighting 5th Estate solidarity through your absolutely [i]astra:)nomical[/i] interconnections - no words will ever do justice to the importance and [i]ongoing[/i] influence of your wondrous Links. Political historians of the future will curse you for the huge embarrassment of contemporary riches you have obliged them to read! And none better than our own Ad astra's of course. Well Folks we really are at the end of the Era now, Mars has aligned with Pluto, and things will never be the same. Lyn and Ad have lives beyond the Sword and both are weary of this war. They have both bequeathed us a rich legacy but also set a standard of which we must strive to be worthy. The Spirit of the Sword will not pass, and though we have lost this big battle we will regroup and come back stronger than ever - for now the steely boots are on our feet, and it is the Abborrrtians who must tread barefoot on the caltrops they themselves have spread. http://www.sensis.com.au/search.do?partnerId=bigpond&find=caltrops&profile=global-only And just a few pretty examples: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=active&biw=1243&bih=904&gbv=2&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=caltrops&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&oq= But it's a funny thing, and I feel it in the synchronicitous posts here from others too, [i]I'm not as upset by the election loss as I thought I might be.[/i] Rather, I have a new sense of mission, to [i]GET[/i] these bastards once and for all in the next [i]few[/i] months, hold them to account with a ferocity the like of which they've never believed could be turned on them, to prevent by all nonviolent means the destruction of the Labor achievements. This isn't me, it's US. WE will do this. From Day 1 - today as I write. Ad I think you're right about Albo. His loyalties torn to the point of tears - strangely yet clearly loyal to both *J*U*L*I*A* and Rudd - he remains the bloke who just wants to fight Tories, well he really means Fascists but sadly the Fascists would mangle him if he said that. Guerrilla street-fighters can't afford frontal attacks except when they have control of the ground. But We are about to take that ground. We WILL have the NBN! We WILL prevent the destruction of the price on carbon, the Abborttians' cuts to overseas aid, the grossly-unfair treatment of rich and poor wrt paid parental leave... and as to the Boats, oh yes, come on Abborrtt turn a boat around we dare you! Whoever is to lead Labor must be prepared to argue down and dirty, finger-jabbing and browbeating interruptors as soon as they happen and as loudly and pugnaciously as needs be. I urged the last Government many times to do so, but the only time it ever happened was *J*U*L*I*A*s Misogyny Speech - and she creamed Abborttt then. It's never been clearer At the end of this era That now the chief jeerer Is now the chief man But at this grim time I will fight him in Rhyme Till we've sloughed him like slime From this cursed blessed land! Yes we've lost that battle. But in the coming WAR we will sheet home the evil of these people, and Australia will ashamedly clutch at the decent principles and shared aspirations of yesteryear, which includes the courage and foresight and humanity to face the future. And never fear Comrades, this is the end of an era not the world, and we will come back stronger and more united and determined, and guess what brave brothers and sisters, WE WILL WIN! So Brothers and Sisters Never let die That defiant cry Of the Sandinistas! [b][i]VENCEREMOS![/i][/b] Labor will be back sooner than you might think. And then we will grind their faces into their own dirt. Let not The Sword cool in the sheath! http://vimeo.com/47708708

Casablanca

9/09/2013Big change in party, little in policy Ross Gittins September 9, 2013 But surely the most disillusioning thing for Liberal true believers is the way five years of railing against Labor's utterly wasteful spending, never-ending budget deficits and soaring debt levels was simply cast aside over the course of a five-week campaign. Let me be clear: I wholeheartedly agree with the Liberals' last minute pull-back from resort to fiscal austerity. But then I was never taken in by their five years of frightening the fiscally illiterate. All past Coalition audits have been performed by purist economic rationalists who make radical recommendations no government would dream of accepting. These and other promised inquiries (44 in Abbott's case) are just a device to get party hard-liners off a Coalition leader's back before elections. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/big-change-in-party-little-in-policy-20130908-2te1h.html#ixzz2eJwzYURh *** Anthony Albanese likely to be next Labor leader, if he wants to be Lenore Taylor, political editor theguardian.com, Sunday 8 September 2013 18.19 AEST Kevin Rudd's deputy PM says he is undecided about whether to seek leadership, as is the other major contender, Bill Shorten http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/08/anthony-albanese-next-labor-leader *** How Kevin Rudd's 2013 election campaign imploded Deborah Snow. September 9, 2013 It didn't take long for Kevin Rudd's election campaign to go off the rails. In some cases, staff have been blamed, but a big part of the problem seems to lie with the leader himself - Rudd being Rudd. Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/how-kevin-rudds-2013-election-campaign-imploded-20130908-2teb1.html#ixzz2eKIAWGZ7 *** Not the popular choice: emphatic win but approval rating could be a lot better Peter Hartcher. September 9, 2013 - 12:16AM Tony Abbott has not only made history by leading an opposition into government for only the seventh time since the war, he's also defeated the most consistently popular prime minister of the past 40 years. Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/not-the-popular-choice-emphatic-win-but-approval-rating-could-be-a-lot-better-20130908-2te74.html#ixzz2eKIbY5vP *** Life and death issues the election campaign missed David James | 05 September 2013 Two of the most important issues to have been given scant attention in the election campaign are ageing and property. Even less noticed is the inter-relationship between the two. The effect of ageing on property prices will be arguably the most important financial challenge facing Australian governments over the coming decades. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38141#.Uiy_UFK19ZY *** A surprisingly ideological endgame Peter Chen Updated Sun 8 Sep 2013, 3:33pm AEST The election campaign's last days showed how ideological the incoming government, led by Tony Abbott, is going to be across a wide range of policy domains, writes Peter Chen. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-08/chen-election-weekend/4940738 *** The Tony Abbott I know Professor Greg Craven 8 September 2013, 5.48am AEST Yet the reality is that Abbott almost certainly is one of the most complex individuals ever to hold supreme political office in Australia. Even considered solely as a bundle of conundrums, he is the proverbial politician with enough material to ground an entire conference. http://theconversation.com/the-tony-abbott-i-know-17783

2353

9/09/2013I was discussing this yesterday. Nice to know someone got paid to say the same thing. http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/campbells-job-cuts-a-factor-in-labor-resistance-20130908-2te1f.html

Michael

9/09/2013Look, uummm.... PETA!!!!!

Michael

9/09/2013Footnote to my post above, and well worth reading in its own right - http://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/big-change-in-party-little-in-policy-20130908-2te1h.html#ixzz2eJwzYURh As you read the Ross Gittins article, check out the picture of Abbott, captioned "Tony Abbott in Sydney yesterday" which illustrates Abbott meeting with a senior bureaucrat. Notice that the bureaucrat and Abbott are side by side, and that the photograph could have been taken/cropped to get over precisely the message of the caption by displaying Abbott, the bureaucrat, and the undoubtedly important paperwork on the tabletop before them. Notice, however, that this is not the full message of this photograph, certainly not as it was taken, and apparently as the editors of the newspaper decided to run it. Because, off to the right side of the picture, sitting there watching over every word and move by 'her boy'... Peta Credlin. Looking like that's where she'll always be, honestly framed in the photograph or not (and I suspect not, that the 'word' will come down soon NOT to include Credlin in the taking of photographs, and certainly for her to be cropped OUT in publishing any that do catch sight of her). So, whenever you see a pic of MadeIt! Tony in future, with a caption anything like "Tony Abbott in... today", be sure, be coldly certain, consigliere Credlin is right there. Ans if that doesn't make you feel warm and fuzzy and confident about Australia's future, I don't know what will. (I'm sure that's what photographer Alex Ellinghausen had in mind, just to make us all feel that little bit more comfortable with our morning news. (And make it bloody obvious this is what we're stuck with as long as Tony Abbott is Lodged in Australia's political gullet!)

Ad astra

9/09/2013Talk Turkey What a touching tribute you make to Lyn and me. Written from your heart, it warms our hearts. To have our efforts so commended by someone as astute as you are, is the ultimate compliment. Like you, I am relieved that the shouting and the tumult of the campaign has abated, and comforted that the bloodbath that was predicted by the pollsters as they polled marginal seats, did not eventuate. Labor was convincingly defeated, but not decimated. Most senior figures have been returned, thereby creating a base from which to build a strong opposition and later a good government. Rudd’s decision to not contest the leadership clears the air for a new start, hopefully devoid of the sabotage that resulted in the loss of the most outstanding leader, Julia Gillard. I hope that Albo is chosen as leader. In my view Bill Shorten still bears the ignominy of his role in Kevin Rudd’s removal, and then Julia Gillard’s. I would like to see Tanya Plibersek as deputy. Our dilemma is how to proceed now that the election is decided. First we must take a break. Then we need to decide who keeps the sword sharp, and who thrusts it into those who seek to amplify inequity, those who would widen the gap between the wealthy and the poor, those who favour big business over the environment, those who advantage private education at the expense of public, those who would prefer to give a decent NBN only to those who can afford it. Fundamentally, Labor differs from the Coalition in that it cares for the ‘little guy’, as Rudd said in his concession speech. Labor cares for the workers, the small businesses, the disadvantaged, the disabled, and the indigent. The Coalition cares more for the wealthy, the influential, and the powerful: Rupert Murdoch, Gina Rinehart and the miners, George Pell and the Catholic Church. It is this stark difference that deserves the attention of Swordsters. Fighting for justice, fairness and equity is our core business. The beautiful melody and lyrics of The Syke Boat Song are so apt: Chorus: Speed, bonnie boat, like a bird on the wing,
 Onward! the sailors cry;
 Carry the lad that's born to be King
 Over the sea to Skye. Loud the winds howl, loud the waves roar,
 Thunderclouds rend the air;
 Baffled, our foes stand by the shore,
 Follow they will not dare. Chorus Though the waves leap, soft shall ye sleep,
 Ocean's a royal bed.
 Rocked in the deep, Flora will keep
 Watch by your weary head. Chorus Many's the lad fought on that day,
 Well the Claymore could wield,
 When the night came, silently lay
 Dead in Culloden's field. Chorus Burned are their homes, exile and death 
Scatter the loyal men;
 Yet ere the sword cool in the sheath
 Charlie will come again. We are yet to see who will be our ‘Bonnie Prince Charlie’. Until we know, our swords must not cool in their sheaths. You have been a valiant and loyal swordster for many years, wielding your verbal sword eloquently, in words and verse, and this morning in song. Long may your sword find its mark. [b]VENCEREMOS[/b]

jane

9/09/2013Another reason why "Honest" Tony Abbott is such a favourite with the wizened foreign criminal. http://imputeation.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/abbotts-age-of-entitlement-tonys-top.html There's a rumour doing the rounds on Twitter that Liealot is on a last warning by the Party. Turnbull is sharpening a knife while he waits in the wings, apparently. Hypothetically, does anyone think Turnbull, or the rest of the Liars, for that matter would feel obliged to bend over for Rupert, the miners & IPA?

Ad astra

9/09/2013Casablanca Many thanks for your links this morning, all interesting reading. Ross Gittins always writes balanced analysis and opinion. Who could disagree with his analysis? There is now a lot of analysis of why Labor lost. It’s inevitable that Kevin Rudd will cop most of the blame, justifiably so. I see Bruce Hawker is already running for cover, blaming the Labor head office. I hope Hawker disappears from the Labor scene. I deplore his involvement in Julia Gillard’s removal, and he wasn’t impressive during the campaign. How he thought he could control Rudd is beyond comprehension. Peter Hartcher now seems to be having doubts when he writes: “[i]But it also reveals a hesitant vote of confidence in Abbott's Coalition – fewer than half of the voters who abandoned Rudd switched to the Coalition, which gained only 1.7 per cent on primary votes.”[/i] But he ends by giving Abbott the benefit of the doubt: “[i]Can he do it? We already know he can. His conduct as a minister in the Howard government provided a glimpse of the grown-up prime minister Abbott needs to become.”[/i] Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/not-the-popular-choice-emphatic-win-but-approval-rating-could-be-a-lot-better-20130908-2te74.html Fellow Catholic Greg Craven writes a craven puff piece about his mate Tony. Nauseating. Again thanks for your links.

Ad astra

9/09/2013Michael That is an interesting photo. There is no doubt about the influence of Peta Credlin. I suspect most of the Abbott slogans and the small target strategy were her inventions. It is astonishing that she was present at initial briefings of the PM Elect. Maybe this is how Abbott intends to run his office of PM and Cabinet. In his acceptance speech, he described her as somewhat of a martinet. Perhaps he likes dominant women! Take a look at his Peta: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/big-change-in-party-little-in-policy-20130908-2te1h.html jane That is an impressive list of expense claims by our PM Elect. It looks like he works the system craftily. 2353 The article: “[i]Campbell's job cuts a factor in Labor resistance”[/i] reinforces what many of us expected. Read more: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/campbells-job-cuts-a-factor-in-labor-resistance-20130908-2te1f.html

Michael

9/09/2013All this talk about how Abbott will "become" a style of Prime Minister, will "mature" into the job, will be "ennobled" by its responsibilities. BS! The Jesuits got it right centuries ago - "Give us the child until he is eight, and he is ours for life." There's nothing in Abbott with the potential to change. An ego-stroked bully, from his parent's kitchen table to the Cabinet table of Federal government, he's exactly what he projected onto Kevin Rudd (with some validation) - 'it's all about me!' Abbott's as hollow as anyone on his team, Howard's Thirds, the lees left at the bottom of a drained wineglass after 2007. He'll "grow" into nothing. Abbott's always telling us they'll be good in government, "because we've done it before". Precisely, this is the mob that rubberstamped WorkChoices (whatever Abbott claims was his own position in Cabinet), signed off on the Iraq War, queued up to watch as health, education and infrastructure budgets withered, sat and complacently watched refugees be 'criminalised' by government fiat. They've "done it before" all right, and if ever there had been one single reason not to elect them this last weekend, that was it. As to a "mandate", and Julie Bishop claiming that since the Liberals acquiesced on WorkChoices being tossed out after 2007 Labor and everyone else should so the same on rescinding a climate policy of carbon pricing... Take a walk, Death Stare. WorkChoices was not a policy taken to the electorate, it was an opportunistic grab at diminishing workers' rights taken by a government that unexpectedly found itself with control of both Houses of Parliament. Carbon pricing is a longstanding commitment of Labor and the Greens and other parties/elected representatives with them. To turn away from it and ignore human responsibilty for climate change would be to slap in the face every voter who gave their vote, their faith, and their philosophy, to these parties. Only a Coalition patsy like Julie Bishop (well, all of them) could assert that if you didn't vote Coalition, your vote is worthless, 'roll over and die'. FY, JB.

Gordonwa

9/09/2013Bilko @ 12:52 AM My partner and I are big Tolkien fans. I once read aloud the entire trilogy to her. We saw the movies at the cinema when they came out and had to wait a year between each one. We also have them on Blue Ray. We watched Part Two The Two Towers last night. Yes I'm in WA (I stole the wa part of my username from Patriciawa who also frequents this site, delighted to meet up with Patricia when Julia Gillard came here shortly before she was rolled). Our arrogant Premier Colin Barnett is breaking promises and telling people to get over it. We only have one newspaper over here and they have belatedly started to hold him to account after giving him dream run before our recent state election. Unfortunately, four more years before we can have another vote. Perth's population is growing rapidly so I imagine you would see massive changes since you were last here. I hope your eldest grandson is able to make the move over here but I should point out that we have had three of driest winters on record in the last four years (we're not allowed to mention climate change under the Libs) and would be suffering severe water shortages if the previous Labor government had not built desalination plants. They were, of course, roundly criticised at the time for this "unnecessary, profligate spending" on infrastructure.

Ken

9/09/2013Jane and Ad Will the MSM now finally pay some attention to Abbott's travel rorts, to Ashbygate, to the outcomes of the Slipper and Thomson affairs - the latter probably not as they will no longer be members of Parliament although the role of some continuing members should be under the spotlight. Or will they give Abbott his "honeymoon" period and ignore all this. I don't think the answer is as straightforward as it seems. Normally I would say that they will ignore all these things but when looking for "news" each day, and no longer a Labor government to attack, these issues may eventually be all that is left to put on the front pages. So Abbott's success could also be his undoing. Ad Agree that Albo should be number one choice. He is tough, from a solid Labor background, and I have little doubt would be "the people's choice". I am not impressed with Shorten. I think if he were elected leader it would be back to the Labor backroom machine running things which is one perception (real or imagined) that Labor needs to overcome. I think Shorten would appear more like the man focused only on gaining power, whereas Albo appears to stand for something which will be crucial at the next election. Speaking of the next election, it will be interesting to see whether Abbott keeps his "promise" to go to a double dissolution if the repeal of the carbon pricing is defeated. It will be a Catch 22 for both parties. Another election before the end of 2014 could backfire on both parties and the halving of the quota for the Senate would create a plethora of single issue Senators (as we are seeing in the current results, only there will be even more of them, creating more uncertainty in future years). Labor will need to be very careful in handling the carbon price repeal lest, at a double dissolution, they can be portrayed as the party that forced the voters back to the ballot box. They will need to be in a position to argue that the LNP has caused the double dissolution unnecessarily. I think Albo and Pliberseck are more capable of pulling that off than Shorten.

Ad astra

9/09/2013Michael, Ken Your comments are spot on.

Lucy

9/09/2013Thanks for the good wishes everyone. And on the carbon price I think we should stick to our principles on this. WE have an obligation not only to Australia but to the rest of the world. So we should fight this tooth and nail. The carbon price is not wrecking this country. Sentiment driven down by Abbott did however have a huge effect. Gina & Co. will now start hiring again giving a false impression of something happening, funny that? But we need more than just relying on mining. But don't expect any brilliant ideas from the builders of #fraudband

Bull taco Metrella

9/09/2013Thanks for keeping hope alive, a rest will do us good. Rupert will pass on, Abbott will face the grim reality of Government and small businesses will be ground out of existence by the Megaliths. but we will return...

Perpetually Enraged

9/09/2013Ad, Another excellent article I shall be sharing to my FB Page. The only thing I would say is that this: "From the very beginning of the election campaign Rupert Murdoch marshalled his formidable forces in support of Abbott while he waged a barefaced propaganda war against Rudd and Labor." should read: "From the moment the outcome of the 2010 election was decided, Rupert Murdoch......." Thanks for all your insights Ad, and Lyn for your daily links. Have a rest, we will continue to post and inform as widely as we can. I believe this election was the last that will be decided by what is said by the Fourth Estate. The next will be decided by the Fifth Estate and what we say on Facebook, Twitter, in blogs, in comments on all the online media forms. Just as Murdoch started with the propaganda war 3 years ago, so should we all start now with getting the truth out and holding to account Abbott and his "illegitimate government" :)

Ad astra

9/09/2013Lucy How right you are! Labor must stick to its intention to have a price on carbon and an ETS. This is not political, it is an environmental necessity to avoid irreversible global warming with all its catastrophic effects, effects that unchecked could destroy life on this planet as we know it. The Coalition does not care about this - how can it be taken seriously with its DAP? I see that to date you have 37.2% of the TPP vote with a swing to Labor of 2.8%. Against a sitting Leader of the Nationals and Deputy Leader of the Opposition, that is a fine achievement. Congratulations. Bull taco Metrella Welcome to [i]The Political Sword[/i]. We must never lose hope. The election result was not good for Labor, but the bloodbath in Queensland and the western suburbs of Sydney did not occur. We can and must build from the solid Labor base remaining.

Casablanca

9/09/2013Jane, That was a [i]'must file'[/i] link that you provided to: Abbott's age of entitlement: http://imputeation.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/abbotts-age-of-entitlement-tonys-top.html *** Mission accomplished September 9, 2013. Mark Baker How they won it Discipline, attention to detail and the ability to play the media secured the Coalition's victory. Late last week Joe Hockey was overheard chatting with Liberal Party federal director Brian Loughnane in the foyer of Melbourne's Park Hyatt Hotel. ''It's been a six-year campaign but the first two years we were fighting each other,'' said Hockey. Abbott's one-vote win over Malcolm Turnbull in the Liberal leadership ballot in December 2009 was a turning point for the Coalition. It ended the funk in the Liberal ranks after the defeat of the Howard Government and the ill-fated experiment of Turnbull's leadership. And it was the starting point for Abbott's brutally effective war of attrition against Labor - first under Rudd and then under Julia Gillard - that set the stage for Saturday's victory. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/mission-accomplished-20130908-2tdxq.html#ixzz2eMwYb6Kj *** No time for Abbott to hover with the knife Stephen Koukoulas.9 September 2013 http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/9/election/no-time-abbott-hover-knife *** The dawning of grown-up Australia Rob Burgess - Election 20138 9 Sep 2013 But when the hangovers are gone, few will labour for long under the misapprehension that the victory is ‘decisive’ and ‘changes everything’. Rather, the nation faces a great peril – that the next three years of government will be like the last. Australia just cannot afford that. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/8/election/dawning-grown-australia *** Labor awaits Albanese's decision Michelle Grattan 9 Sept 2013 History will treat the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd Labor government harshly, not for what it did or didn’t do but for how it conducted itself. It came in with a convincing mandate in 2007 and, through bad leadership and appalling infighting, it squandered its opportunities. Credit is due – but part of it must go to China and the mining boom – for managing to keep the country out of recession during the global financial crisis. And there are legacy policies including the disability insurance scheme and the schools funding reforms. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/9/politics/labor-awaits-albaneses-decision *** Howes tipped to replace Carr: report AWU national secretary front-runner to replace Senator, after his expected resignation. Paywalled: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/9/9/election/howes-tipped-replace-carr-report *** Putting Labor's NBN out of its misery Stephen Bartholomeusz. 9 Sept 2013 Malcolm Turnbull’s NBN overhaul will mark the beginning of the end to Labor’s slow-motion rollout. An FTTN solution may not be as fast, but it will bring quicker returns for Telstra and lower costs for consumers. Paywalled: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/9/technology/putting-labors-nbn-out-its-misery *** Coalition under surplus pressure Economists say new govt will need to make deeper cuts than flagged to get to surplus. Paywalled: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/9/9/election/coalition-under-surplus-pressure ***

Bilko

9/09/2013Gordonwa Thanks for the info, it is funny my OH and I are not Tolkien fans but our children and grandchildren are, I am an Asimov fan and his type of S/Fiction rather than S/Fantasy. My first hero was Dan Dare from the eagle comic back in the UK, in fact after I left home and joined the RAF my dad did not cancel the comic until they moved house a couple of years later. I expect climate change to be banned from future OZ media under the new Fuhrer.

Ken

9/09/2013Loved this tweet from the English comedian Bill Bailey on the Oz election: [quote]Oz, have you elected a climate-change denying halfwit, cos I said you can't have a world leader called Kevin? I am truly sorry.[/quote]

VinnietheDog96

9/09/2013Hi Swordsters - an article I found that made me perk up a little. Checked to see that no-one had already posted, and couldn't see it. Forgive me if it has already been shared. Not sure how paste a live link sorry ! http://www.thevine.com.au/life/news/why-an-abbott-election-victory-would-be-good-20130905-264996/

Sue Sirett

9/09/2013Rest? How can we rest? The Slug is not to be allowed to bask in his ill-gotten sunshine. Just because Murdoch did a Grover Norquist, and got his Leader that is incapable of independent thought, but can sign things, doesn't mean that we have to sit back and let things go. Murdoch will find that his path to senile bliss is strewn with lego-block-like obstacles. (If he wasn't such an egomaniac, he would see that his Twitter account is a liability for him). He will be mocked, and his papers, and online publications will be mocked. The boycott is ongoing. We have allies in every country he has poisoned with his tripe. I actually received commiserations from the owner of one of the pages I follow. Abbott will get no mercy, either. He and his Nasty Party will be hounded. Too much is at stake to lay down our arms. We all have parents, and children, and friends who will be affected by the slash and burn.

Casablanca

9/09/2013Election day reflections on religion in the public square Frank Brennan | 06 September 2013 I have been asked to address media ethics and responsibilities in the modern era. A key question for you at this conference is what are the fundamental principles that stand despite the radically changing nature of media (the rise of online and of social media etc.) - both as media professionals, and as religious media professionals. In this context your organisers have suggested that I might have something to say about the place of religion in the public square, within this context. And how clever of you to choose the day of the federal election for me to offer these reflections. I come amongst you, not as a publisher or journalist but as an advocate in the public square animated by my own religious tradition as a Jesuit and Catholic priest engaged on human rights issues in a robustly pluralistic democratic society where religion definitely aint trumps. Remembering the passing of Seamus Heaney let’s commence with the first stanza of his poem 'From the Republic of Conscience': When I landed in the republic of conscience It was so noiseless when the engines stopped I could hear a curlew high above the runway At immigration, the clerk was an old man Who produced a wallet from his homespun coat And showed me a photograph of my grandfather The woman in customs asked me to declare The words of our traditional cures and charms To heal dumbness and avert the evil eye No porters. No interpreter. No taxi. You carried your own burden and very soon Your symptoms of creeping privilege disappeared. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38153#.Ui1s61K19ZY

Casablanca

9/09/2013Australia's political goldfish bowl from the outside Ray Cassin | 08 September 2013 When an election results in a change of government, a stock line of punditry is to search for a 'when was it lost?' moment. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38138#.Ui1tuFK19ZY

Casablanca

9/09/2013Abbott's chief of staff in court for drink driving September 9, 2013 - 1:42PM Michael Inman The 42-year-old blew 0.075 when she was caught by police outside her Canberra home after Mr Abbott's budget reply speech in May. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/abbotts-chief-of-staff-in-court-for-drink-driving-20130909-2tfgt.html#ixzz2eNLtyOph *** Murdoch hits out at public servants September 8, 2013 Noel Towell The US-based media mogul took to social media site Twitter on Saturday evening to accuse public sector workers, along with “phony welfare scroungers,” of sucking the life out of Australia’s economy. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/murdoch-hits-out-at-public-servants-20130908-2tdnq.html#ixzz2eNMNwTCE *** Abbott's task with Indonesia not as easy as it looks September 9, 2013 - 3:52PM Michael Bachelard Tony Abbott has backed away from his pledge to visit Indonesia in his first week in office but the promise stands to make it his first overseas destination as prime minister. The meeting of the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation forum will be held in Nusa Dua, Bali, early next month, so if he also travels to Jakarta before that, he'll be going twice to the country in his first month in office. His visit, or visits, will be watched closely. But without Abbott having lifted a finger, economic circumstances have done him one big favour. In response to a current account scare and the plunge of the rupiah, Indonesia's new finance manager has removed the quota on beef imports in the name of economic stimulus. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/abbotts-task-with-indonesia-not-as-easy-as-it-looks-20130909-2tfr1.html#ixzz2eNMmRIvA ***

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9/09/2013Folks Tony Abbott, Julie Bishop, Greg Hunt and Andrew Robb have been out there stridently insisting that the Coalition has a indisputable [b]mandate[/b] to repeal the carbon tax, and that Labor should get out of the way. The mandate presumably results from Abbott labelling the election a referendum on the carbon tax, and that because he has won convincingly he therefore has a mandate. Of course this is nonsense. Look at Vote Compass: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-26/vote-compass-climate-change-environment/4908224 where 1,357,716 have recorded their opinion on [i]How much should the federal government do to tackle climate change?[/i] 32.7% said much more; 29.1% somewhat more; 20% about the same; 9.76% somewhat less and 8.36% much less. [b]Totaled, 61.8% want more done on climate change, but only 18.12% want less done.[/b] When asked for views on the statement: [i]The federal government should put a price on carbon.[/i], 25.3% strongly agreed; 25.7% agreed; 15.6% were neutral; 13.8% somewhat disagreed and 19.6% strongly disagreed. [b]Totaled, 51% agreed with putting a price on carbon, but only 33.4% disagreed. That looks like a convincing majority want a price on carbon.[/b] [b]So is it a mandate when, of the 1.35 million people who voted on Vote Compass, 61.8% want more done on climate change, but only 18.12% want less; and 51% agreed with putting a price on carbon, and only 33.4% disagreed. That looks like a pretty convincing mandate to me to stick to carbon pricing.[/b]

Lucy

9/09/2013Thanks Ad I'll be going again. One of the problems in these very safe seats is that candidates give up. I wont. The electorate want to know you are serious and they need to know you. This is something that is very difficult to achieve in an electorate this big. I had very limited resources in both money and people. I have travelled thousands of KM's - went to every market, talked to hundreds of people, listened to people's concerns, so now I have to build on it. And then at the end of the day the PUP candidate pulled in 11,000 votes and he did no real campaigning, nothing! Gordon Dale the Katter candidate did what I did, he had two offices one in Gympie and one in Maryborough, drove everywhere went to every event, even more than I did because he was at it longer. And along comes Clive promised the moon, to pensioners and gullible people via his Robo phone calls. I have nothing against Steve Anderson, but honestly to just turn up and use money to effectively buy votes. Quite dishonest and definitely disingenuous.

DMW

9/09/2013What an interesting couple of days digesting the prognostications of the Sunday/Monday Morning experts on [i]why we/they won/lost [/i] and then of course there was the commentary of the 'real political strategy' game/s of football. Although it was actually said on Saturday night these words were possibly the neatest summary: [i]I would give us nine out of ten for governing the country, I'd give us zero out of ten for governing ourselves. I think it's pretty plain we had too many people playing their own games and not playing for the team.[/i] Spoken by Tanya Plibersek of course. ... and also on Saturday night the possibly wisest and most gracious comment: [i]Congrats to Mr Abbott & Mr Truss for leading their parties to victory. I wish them & their teams well. It's always an honour to serve. JG [/i] @JuliaGillard. There have been any number of good to excellent summaries of the hows and whys many that have already been linked to by others. One by a well respected Fifth Estate blooger that seems to have slipped through cracks opened with this sentence: [i]News Corp didn't win the 2013 election for the Coalition. The Labor Party's dysfunctional internal politics had more to do with that.[/i] Without saying it that way Ms Plibersek implied the same and other Labor people are saying in one way or another [i]It was our own fault we lost[/i] The second sentence from the above commentator reads: [i]But that doesn't mean the calculated propaganda which Murdoch's papers call news is not an issue for anyone concerned about the health of this democracy.[/i] It is from [b]Mr Denmore [/b] @ [b]The Failed Estate[/b] http://thefailedestate.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/under-dome.html One thing that must happen before any effective movement can be made on Mr Murdoch's pernicious influence over the political 'narrative' is that we have to decouple it from it being seen as [i]Anti Labor[/i]. It is in fact [b]Anti Democracy [/b] and Labor supporters would be better served by separating the most recent loss from the actions of Mr Murdoch and his media empire/s. While ever it is seen as Anti Labor there will be too many people who will think it benefits them and their side when the reality is, it is to the detriment of the nation as a whole and we need thinking people from all sides to stand together to curb him.

DMW

9/09/2013The leadership question/answer offers some interesting fodder. Apart from Shorten it appears all the 'candidates' are from NSW although I did see that someone suggested Jenny Macklin. When it comes to Ms Plibersek the words of the bloke who originally nominated her for pre-selection come back to me: [i]Tanya doesn't have the inner mongrel needed to be leader [/i] While I am not so sure that 'inner mongrel' is a top five requirement for a leader there is something of a relationship between mongrel and courage that certainly helps. While a Albanese/Plibersek ticket has a certain dream team aspect to it it is one that is highly unlikely to get up as both are inner Sydney 'Lefties' whose seats join each others. It seems to me that no matter who becomes leader it seems to me a smart choice for deputy would be someone from a regional, or possibly rural electorate. Not sure who that would be particularly as the bloke I would choose, Mike Kelly, seems to be in danger of losing his seat. Damn, real shame if a top operator like Kelly goes down.

42 long

9/09/2013I would find it hard to believe that the free advertising for the abbott and against K Rudd provided by Murdoch papers, had no effect and when Palmer buys advertising it works for him. Is Rupert buying and keeping his newspapers all for nothing. Of course it works. He tells us so and we are not completely stupid. Everyone in public life sucks to him and gives him what he wants, or runs the risk of going nowhere because they are made to look stupid as individuals or collectively. Those full front page adverts sit all along streets everywhere. Murdoch has to give his papers out for free and still some don't want them. Those presentations become the basis for most conversations on radio and TV all daY LONG. I would defy anyone to LISTEN to 2GB for a week and still be SANE. It's leading the charge to demonise LEFT thinkers in the eyes of the general public. REALLY SICK

42 long

9/09/2013The panel on Q&A tonight is terribly stacked Tanya Plibersek alone facing KR Ogre Climate denier, Tony Jones,never impartial. Dreadful RICHO ( the turncoat) It may be a Gloat and bully episode. No attempt at balance. Rather a poor effort at this point in time. I will force myself to watch it in the interests of being across what is happening. Good onya Tanya. The fact they put the lot against you means they have to hunt in a pack, because individually they are not up to it. Hyena's.

Ken

9/09/2013DMW I hope to Dog that Macklin is not in the mix for a leadership role - even deputy - in fact any role. I worked in her department for a number of years and despite her public pesona she is hopeless in my view. She was as bad as Rudd in insisting her office micro-manage all sorts of things that should have been PS adminstrative decisions. Rule her out completely - please!! Agree that Albo and Tania may be a dream but one I would like to see. 42 long I am one of those who doubts the extent of the impact of Murdoch, not that it had no impact, but that, given the election result, it did not influence many people, perhaps 1-2% at best. Yes, that can be enough to swing a seat but it is a lot of money and effort for what I consider a minor outcome. If he could argue that 5-10% changed their positions, Murdoch would have a case to justify his expenditure. Despite his papers and the shock jocks turning their comments into "news" and talking points, it actually shows that most people aren't swayed by it - mostly it is only those for whom it is reinforcing their own pre-held position. And look at Greenway, a 3% swing to Labor in a western Sydney seat (against Jayme Diaz). As Anthony Green said on Saturday night, it shows "candidates matter".

Jason

9/09/2013DMW, Mark Dreyfus would be my choice with Albo as deputy and Andrew Leigh as shadow treasurer

42 long

9/09/2013Ken, If what you say is true Murdoch wouldn't bother. Advertising has effect and Murdoch put all his big guns out are you saying his constant Climate denial and presentation of non facts is not significant. "I read it in the Paper" still has a resonance. When I go to the trouble of explaining his LIES people don't believe he would print lies and untruths. They are indoctrinated. Propaganda works It always has and always will and he is expert at practicing it.

Ad astra

9/09/2013DMW Thanks for the link to Mr Denmore. A very good read. http://thefailedestate.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/under-dome.html

roblpittman

9/09/2013We have been here before but it will be alright in the long run! In 1972 Gough won the election to become the first Labor PM in over two decades. Murdoch played his usual right wing part in turning unthinking Australians away from the best Government that had happened to the mass of Australians in years. A right wing puppet, Malcolm Fraser was “appointed” and played his part in the “Dismissal” of a legitimate Government on 11 November 1975, by Governor-General Sir John Kerr. The Coalition won 91 seats to Labor’s 36 in the House of Representatives. We have just seen a repeat of the Murdoch scenario where Murdoch has been outrageously working against arguably one of the best Governments this country has seen. A Government which passed more legislation than any former Government, a Government which carried us through the GFC virtually unscathed and the Government whose term ended with a credit rating of AAA from all world Credit Agencies and with record low interest rates, great reforms like school improvements, health improvements, DisabilityCare Australia, the rollout begun on the NBN and record low taxation of Australians. We now have our new Murdoch Puppet PM, Tony Abbott thanks to unthinking voters and need to accept this is democracy in action but we must also accept that as the great band Redgum sang it will be alright in the long run. The greatest pleasure of the 1975 defeat was on the 5 March 1983 when the ineffective Liberal PM Fraser conceded defeat with tears streaming down his face beaten by Bob Hawke. Labor reversed the 1975 result in eight years gaining 75 seats to the Coalition's 50. In the next few weeks the same ineffectiveness of Coalition Government will start to show and although I predict two terms of messy, dead dull Governing of Australia by Murdoch's current puppet, it will be alright in the long run!

Ken

9/09/201342 long I know propaganda works but did it really work in this case? I've been looking at 11 western Sydney seats where the Telegraph is the main paper. Of those 11, 2 have been gained by the LNP and 2 are in doubt (lost Banks and Lindsay, Reid and Parramatta too close to call). There were swings to Labor in two seats, and swings to the LNP of less than 2% in five. Labor's first preference vote was above 45% in 7 seats (above 50% in 6). In many cases it was a collapse in the Green vote that contributed to Labor problems (and before you jump in, I know Murdoch has been undermining them for years and perhaps that effect was more important). And another factor is boundary changes. One I know personally is Reid. Although that has been a very safe Labor seat for years, its boundaries now extend north-easterly towards the lower North Shore. When I lived there the boundary stretched south and included Labor areas towards Bankstown. My home, Auburn, was either towards its northern edge, or central (as boundaries changed) but now Auburn is at its southern edge. Not in disagreement with your general observations but add this as food for thought.

Ken

9/09/201342 long Correction: Labor vote above 50% in 5 seats.

DMW

9/09/2013Hi Ken, oops meant the Albo/Tanya would be a 'top' team not an 'in your dreams team, agree about Maklin as leader though would probably be a good 'I've got your back deputy'. Hey Jason, that looks a pretty good 'opening order' though is Dreyfus ready? I guess if he gets the nod he would grow into it quickly and well. On Leigh I keep seeing him as education 'supremo' an area where he would outclass almost everyone and would cut what'sisname to pieces.

Ken

9/09/2013DMW I took it as you intended and meant to agree that it is a dream team that is unlikely to eventuate - but just wish it could!

DMW

9/09/2013Hey Lucy, welcome back to this 'real world' :) Good on you for being ready to go around again. We will back you and hopefully in some practical ways. One thought though, will Truss stand again? By 2016 I think he will be knocking on the door of seventy. He, and possibly the electorate, may think he has reached his use by date. Of course a DD before then, handled properly, could easily see him in hot water.

Ken

9/09/201342 long Just to answer the other part of your response. Murdoch does it because of his own ego and because he wants to "believe" he is a major player. I think the western Sydney vote (and I forgot to include Greenway which adds another to the Labor side of the ledger) suggests trhat his influence is not as great as he likes to believe himself. I think we attack him better, not by decrying his influence, but by pointing out how little influence he really had. That electorates voted according to many other reasons, including local issues and local candidates, not according to what his papers were saying. Gather enough evidence for that and you really undermine him and especially undermine his ego - that will hurt him!

Catching up

9/09/2013To cut a line under where Labor has been for the last few years. The new leader, needs to be one, that has never been in the Rudd camp. There is still plenty of talent among the newer clean skins. As for the so called carbon tax. Vote against any repeal in the first instance. I say this, so the public can be educated in what is actually been repealed. Let it sit there for the period, that Abbott needs to call a DD. Reassess at that time. Make Abbott justify the repealing on the so called tax. There is only one mandate, that any PM has. That is to muster the votes on the floor of both houses. If he cant do that, he has no mandate. There was not much evidence, that the repealing of the tax, was mentioned by voters during th whole campaign. All the noise came from the mouth of Abbott and Co. It is not about repealing a tax. It is about not addressing the man made climate change, caused by carbon emissions. Abbott needs to prove, that the majority do not want the matter addressed. The big minority, that still voted for Labor, and other parties, still deserve to have their views considered. The MRRT and other things, that Abbott want to repeal, to me are a different matter. It is just a tax, that has no effect on the environment. If one follows the Oppositions belief that they have the right to have all passed, why not just let them turn up to parliament, send the rest home, until the next election.

Jason

9/09/2013DMW, I think Dreyfus is ready for two reasons (1) he isn't a former "union" Boss and really hasn't got the baggage of a Shorten and I think Shorten is a dill who only has his best interests at heart.(2)He would be seen as a safe leader while Albo could continue as an attack dog much like Abbott was under Howard! Andrew Leigh is a Professor in economics among other things and I think he could tie Hockey and Robb up, as I think they both are poorly suited 2 their new jobs as time will prove and can't cope with pressure.

2353

9/09/2013Abbott has a big problem. Assuming (que fauz surprise here) he finds the finances are much worse than expected and junks his policies, sacks more public servants and reduces services in a similar way to Newman - the effects of this will still be washing through the system when he is able to do a Double Dissolution. He has two options really. The first is to be seen to do nothing that will be unpopular to his own rusted on voters until the DD trigger is pulled - and be accused of not implementing the changes he promised. The second is to annoy those that won't vote for him anyway plus a considerable number of his rusted on voters by doing cuts like Newman, Barnett, O"Farrell etc and hoping he just hangs on through a DD. If the ALP has any marketing intelligence (doubtful on recent evidence both at Queensland and Federal level), they should be checking everything Abbott says and factually checking it (especially in relation to climate change and refugees). Then produce ads over the next three years that basically say "Abbott said [whatever], that is a lie and here is our factual evidence and run them regardless of whether an election has been called. Of course that would also mean that the ALP Leader would have to clearly articulate the history of the past 6 years and how s/he would build on what is left of that history.

Misst

9/09/2013I wrote on this thread earlier but I just have 1 link to add. Read it and weep ... The Greatest Threat to Your Business, Your Income & the Economy https://plus.google.com/117364153071764012642/posts Thanks once more Ad Astra and Lyn. Hope you'll be baaack after you're well deserved rest.

Ad astra

9/09/2013Roblpittman Welcome to [i]The Political Sword[/i] family and thank you for your interesting comment and for the history you proffer. Your conclusion is reassuring: [i]In the next few weeks the same ineffectiveness of Coalition Government will start to show and although I predict two terms of messy, dead dull Governing of Australia by Murdoch's current puppet, it will be alright in the long run!”[/i] I believe you are right.

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9/09/2013Folks I'm calling it a day.

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9/09/2013Misst Thanks for your comment and the link.

TalkTurkey

9/09/2013VinnietheDog96 I don't know if you've posted here before but Welcome anyway. Thank you, you linked perfectly and the message there is very much what many others, including Ad astra and myself, have been thinking. The boots have swapped sides in an odd way. They think they've got the fists but we got the spiked boots now. Abborrtt will make a mess of the 3xAAA economy, make Australia an international pariah on AS and foreign aid and carbon pricing, slash thousand of jobs and many services, wreck the remnant environment, Catholicise and religious-fundamentalise the educational system, cause strikes and social disruption, oh lovely, but it will be clearly and obviously Abborrrtt's fault and we will kick them for it. [b]And whack 'em and whack 'em and whack 'em![/b] [i]“We shall creep out quietly into the butler's pantry--" cried the Mole. "--with our pistols and swords and sticks--" shouted the Rat. "--and rush in upon them," said Badger. [b]"--and whack 'em, and whack 'em, and whack 'em!"[/b] cried the Toad in ecstasy, running round and round the room, and jumping over the chairs.[/i] ― Kenneth Grahame, [i]The Wind in the Willows[/i] So Albo looks like our best choice Because he got a bare-knuckle voice!

Kate

10/09/2013Just want to support and thank you Lucy for your wonderful effort in this election and hopefully the next to come. Its so important for Labor supporters like me to hear from you and gain some understanding of how hard you work for the cause. Thanks again

janice

10/09/2013Good morning all. Jason, I agree with your choice in the leadership stakes. I also agree with your assessment of Shorten. Lucy, Just want to thank you for your effort to unseat Truzzzzz. Pity too many voters are not interested enough to inform themselves about the big issues like the NBN. Sometimes I tend to think the LNP are adding 'stupid pills' to the water in the electorates they hold.

Ad astra

10/09/2013VinnietheDog96, Sue Sirett Welcome to you both to [i]The Political Sword[/i] family, and thank you for your comments. Thank you too VinnietheDog96 for the link to [i]The Vine[/i]. Interesting reading. The spectre of an Abbott government is a reality for us now. Soon the inadequacies of this man will be apparent as he finds government harder than opposition, three word slogans and flouro vests and hard hats.

Janet (j4gypsy)

10/09/2013Ad, thank you for a piece that sums up so perfectly the 'prostitution of the press'. We have a lot of work to do with changing the behaviour of the media in the next few years. I am glad you and the lovely Lynnie will be resting for a time. I agree that it is a time for re-thinking how to keep the sword sharp without creating such an enormous demand, and possibly drain, on you both (and for the words that always describe both your contributions to Oz progressive critical thinking, I can never go further than the song and verse of TT - sublime :-)). Lucy: you have performed brilliantly! It is a great delight to hear that you will stand again, too. There are other factors, though, as well as the extraordinary behaviour of the media, that have led to Labor's defeat. Here are two pieces this morning that begin to flesh out some of these: the almost impossibility of the ALP managing to pull together a campaign in 8 weeks when it had to ditch three years of preparation; the impossibility of "Rudd" as candidate; the quite superb work of the war office of the LNP (and no, it isn't a compliment to the LNP -- it is a recognition that they streaked ahead in managing themselves). [b]How Ken Rudd's campaign unravelled[/b] [i]by Pamela Williams[/i] Held deep within the top strategy group of the Liberal war room was a document which gave a name and a diagnosis to the personality of Kevin Rudd. It was a document provided to the Liberal’s strategy team on an informal basis by a psychiatrist friendly to the Liberals after Rudd had returned to the Labor leadership on June 26. In a nutshell, this document offered an arm’s-length diagnosis of Rudd as suffering a personality disorder known as “grandiose narcissism”. http://www.afr.com/p/national/how_kevin_rudd_campaign_unravelled_MUATc7semL7gLrK69U2OvN [b]Tony Abbott's election victory and Labor's braindead politics[/b] [i]Aditya Chakrabortty[/i] But it was also braindead politics, playing right into the hands of Abbott's scaremongering over the public finances. What Labor were effectively telling voters was: judge us not on our successes, but on the benchmarks set by our opponents. If that sounds perverse, that's because it is. But, really, it's in line with what social democratic parties around the world have done in the wake of the crisis. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/09/tony-abbott-election-victory-labor?CMP=twt_gu

Janet (j4gypsy)

10/09/2013One other really critical piece from yesterday, from a staffer who worked with both Rudd and Gillard: [b]Keep alive the legacy of Rudd and Gillard, but lock the monster Kulia away in its grave[/b] [i]Sean Kelly[/i] The challenge now for Labor is that, much like Frankenstein's monster, ''Kulia'' threatens to live on even after the election, lurching heavily and awkwardly into the future. How the party reacts to that fact will determine much of what happens in the months and years to come. Even before polling day, it was pretty clear many in Labor had decided it was all over. With the election behind us, the battles between the Rudd and Gillard camps we have seen thus far, will come to seem like mere shadowboxing. There will be many pointing fingers. This is not a problem in itself. Deciding who is to blame for the misfortunes of the past few years is a fight that is unavoidable. It is a legitimate matter for historical debate. http://www.smh.com.au/comment/keep-alive-the-legacy-of-rudd-and-gillard-but-lock-the-monster-kulia-away-in-its-grave-20130908-2tdxk.html#ixzz2eR5nS4cm

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10/09/2013Janet Thank you for your links, which I'll read later. I have to go out for a few hours.

Lucy

10/09/2013Thanks again everyone for your good wishes. Now we have to rebuild, but not I fear before the pain of unpacking!

Michael

10/09/2013The Coalition is already displaying its mean and vicious... I was going to type "side", but the accurate word is "core". Steve Bracks' appointment as Consul General in New York has been revoked. http://news.theage.com.au/breaking-news-national/steve-bracks-ny-posting-scrapped-20130910-2tgt5.html?skin=text-only Expect more, these... people... are spiteful to the outer borders of spite full!

DMW

10/09/2013With rumours that Bob Carr may resign from the senate swirling around I have on solid piece of gratuitous advice for the ALP: [b]If Bob resigns and you don't choose Senator Ursula Stephens [/b] (who it is likely will not be re-elected) [b] then you will prove beyond doubt the ALP is a machine party and not a people's party and I will kick someone very hard [/b] (Apologies to the proverbial dog I hope I don't have to kick you)

TalkTurkey

10/09/2013Lucy Congratulations on your splendid effort against the swing. We are proud of you. Only people who have been deeply involved in Federal election campaigns can know the huge effort that goes into every electorate every day for many months and years. We have lost our local Member in Steve Georganas. Tragic. He was the perfect local member I must say, diligent intelligent and genial. I went to his office yesterday to give whoever might be there my condolences. There were about 5 people there clearing out the office, big sad job. One bloke was loading many bundles of brand-new Corflutes of RUDD into his van for dumping. Several hundred waste ones in that one office alone, dear oh dear. Anyway I kept one as a curio, and I was also able to get a lovely one of *J*U*L*I*A*, the only one in the whole office. But Damn I should have kept whole bundles of the Rudd ones! They would have been WONDERFUL as dart targets at ALP fundraisers! At least I got one. Who wouldn't give good money to throw the first dart?!

42 long

10/09/2013I thought the LieNP got only 1.6% more votes. Is that correct.? Optional preferential votes for the Senate or why not everywhere? Why should you have to give your vote to someone who you don't like. Change the system. To oppose it would be undemocratic. Phoney could easily have a one term (or Less) parliament) just becoming PM won't change the man. He's still HOPELESS. If there were EMERGENCIES everywhere why is there no rush to get the Parliament going? Julie Bitchop..... Feline mon(i)ster for Horror Stares, Affairs and meanness.

DMW

10/09/2013I have come to a sad delusion about who will be the next ALP leader. It appears there are still quite a few that believe Kevin 'I am the saviour' Rudd's publicity. The next leader will be whomever Kevvie chooses otherwise the whole undermining thing will start all over again. For the sake of the party and Australia's sanity [b]Go away Kevin, stop meddling.[/b]

Michael

10/09/2013More on the Bracks axing via the link below, including further evidence that Liberal lying will continue unabated by victory, with Jeff Kennett asserting that an appointment made on May 17 occurred after when "an election had already been called". If May 17 seems a little longer ago than five and a half weeks, welcome to the wonderful world of Coalition numbers, and ponder just how deeply such arithmetics will work on the Australian economy. http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/coalition-cancels-plum-posting-for-bracks-20130910-2tgt5.html?skin=text-only Get ready (see George Brandis on Q&A last night) for a rocky ride with this mob positioned by lies, shaped by them, happy to reiterate them over and over, and clearly so convinced of their efficacy in the wider world that they are addicted to them as a means of being. Not a tactic to make points, lying is now embedded as a characteristic of their existence.

janice

10/09/2013[quote]Julie Bitchop..... Feline mon(i)ster for Horror Stares, Affairs and meanness. [/quote] It will be a miracle if Julie Bitchop doesn't cause a diplomatic incident sooner rather than later. She has already shown her sharp nasty claws over the appointment of Bracks to New York.

Ad astra

10/09/2013Janet Thank you for this morning’s links, and for your kind words. We will all have to reflect on how we proceed from here. There will be plenty to comment about. Michael draws our attention to the first act of Coalition bastardry, the cancellation of Steve Bracks’ appointment as Consul General in New York. We can expect much more of the same. There will be lots of subject matter, but have we the motivation and time to carry on as before? Only time will tell. I’ve bookmarked the comprehensive article by Pamela Williams: [i]How Kevin Rudd's campaign unraveled.[/i] It’s an important historical document. Thank you too for the link to the Sean Kelly article, which contains some good commonsense. I like his conclusion: “[i]Kevin Rudd achieved some extraordinary things, not least Labor's response to the global financial crisis and the apology to the Stolen Generations. Julia Gillard led reforms which will stand the test of time and be remembered as monumental Labor achievements, including disability insurance, schools reform, and carbon pricing. “In the dark days ahead, Labor must hold on to these things, tight. More importantly, the party must be prepared to make this argument publicly, and make it strongly over the years to come. Because the sad truth is that, in the immediate aftermath of this devastating election loss, no one else will.”[/i] Labor cannot rely on the Fourth Estate to do this; indeed it will go on doing the opposite. Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/keep-alive-the-legacy-of-rudd-and-gillard-but-lock-the-monster-kulia-away-in-its-grave-20130908-2tdxk.html You and Casablanca are a godsend for [i]TPS[/i] as Lyn takes a break from posting links. Thank you to you both.

Truth Seeker

10/09/2013Ad, thanks for another fine piece, and all your efforts, and that goes for our little tweety bird too :-) I have just posted my thoughts on where the ALP should go from here [b]"To leakers and whiteanters… STFU!"[/b] :-) http://truthseekersmusings.wordpress.com/2013/09/09/to-leakers-and-whiteanters-stfu/ Cheers :-)

Casablanca

10/09/2013AnneSummers Reports presents [b]JULIA GILLARD IN CONVERSATION WITH ANNE SUMMERS[/b] A very special night — her first public appearance since her gracious farewell speech on 26 June. I invite you to a very special evening with Julia Gillard, who will talk with me about her time in office and what it was like being the first woman to lead our country. It will be our first chance to see and hear Ms Gillard since she left the Prime Ministership in June this year. I am sure we all remember her dignified farewell speech that evening. Now, we will be able to see for ourselves how she is faring post politics. Ms Gillard has agreed to a candid and wide-ranging conversation, and will answer questions from the audience. It promises to be an unforgettable evening. Julia Gillard is the inaugural guest of my new project, ‘Anne Summers Conversations’, one-on-one interviews with well known people who have featured in my online magazine, Anne Summers Reports. Julia Gillard has generously agreed to donate her time to help launch this project. Join Julia Gillard and me for this very special event. SYDNEY Concert Hall, Sydney Opera House Monday, September 30, 2013, 6.30–8pm http://www.sydneyoperahouse.com/whatson/anne_summers.aspx MELBOURNE Melbourne Town Hall Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 6.30–8pm https://annesummersconversations.eventbrite.com.au/ ***

Casablanca

10/09/2013My sister received the following text from a friend in Indonesia: [quote]"Indonesians are saying the business to set up is small boat building as Australia will buy them from you!"[/quote] Are we surprised?

Casablanca

10/09/2013Peta Credlin fined $69 for drink driving charge largely on the grounds that it was a first offence. Each time that the media have mentioned this matter it has emphasized that Ms Credlin was stopped on her way home from Abbott's Budget reply gig. Let's hope that the fine and costs of hiring legal representation do not turn up as 'sundry expenses' on Dept of Finance books for the Abbott team.

Ken

10/09/201342 long Agree that a change in voting, Senate in particular, is needed. I'm not a big fan of optional preferential because I think it somewhat defeats the purpose of preferential voting. It was brought in to overcome the problems of "first past the post": e.g 3 candidates who get 34%, 33% and 33% of the vote. The person with 34% is elected despite 66% not voting for them. Preferential voting at least requires that 50% +1 must support the candidate [u]above[/u] others. With that in mind, I would suggest that Senate voting should require a minimum of 8-12 candidates to be numbered (others would be better placed than me to calculate an optimum number that still allows sufficient allocation of preferences). By limiting the number of preferences required, some, but not all, of the single issue parties would no longer receive preference flows from more major parties and we would not have someone who gets less than 1% of the first preference vote being elected. That's my option for consideration.

Ken

10/09/2013I'm worried that the delay in Labor members announcing their candidacy for the leadership means more backroom deals are being done. And I'm afraid this may favour Shorten. They may do a deal as when Rudd first took the leadership - as someone else suggested, Shorten and Pliberseck, right and left.

42 long

10/09/2013No charge recorded and the $69 is court costs. Listening to abbot speak would drive you to drink especially IF you were worried about him mucking it up. Apparently It's her only offence while she has been driving. It's abbott's fault.

Michael

10/09/2013I feel Albanese would be better in Parliament against Abbott - he'll take the piss out of him, all of Abbott's Fakers, more effectively than Shorten. Shorten has that look of a 'destiny gene' about him that Abbott does. He'll be selfconscious, one eye to Hansard and the Australian Dictionary of Biography every time he opens his mouth in the House. Tanya Plibersek is unlikely to get a guernsey as Alabanese's Deputy - same State, same city, same political leaning... but, she's definitely a leader in waiting. She skewers opponents, like Dutton for years, and Brandis and Kroger last night on Q&A. However, it might be helpful (to her, and most probably to what she'll bring to the nation) if she gets to raise her kids past single digit ages before she has to take on leadership, whether in Opposition or accepting the passed on baton of a Prime Ministership. One thing I would suggest to whoever becomes LOTO in Question Time. As a strategy, do the reverse of what Abbott's Lib's did - ignore the PM. Treat Abbott as an irrelevance, don't give him a soapbox, go after each minister for the matter of ministerial responsibility at hand. Not asked questions, PM Abbott will have nothing to do in QT - he'll look (and not sound, having nothing to respond to) impotent. And that is something that really gets up 'men' like Abbott's noses. On top of that, his Ministers are such a vacuous lot, they'll put their feet in mouths in a way the 'disciplined' (will Peta sit through QT every day now, too???) Abbott won't as he retreats to slogans and mockery.

Casablanca

10/09/2013DMW I posted the following yesterday which predicts that Paul Howes will replace Carr. Regretably the Business Spectator article was paywalled but the title and summary said it all: [quote]AWU national secretary front-runner to replace Senator, after his expected resignation. [/quote]

Ken

10/09/2013Michael Agree entirely about Shorten. I posted similar comment earlier. Also he got rattled a couple of times during the election which would not go down well with the electorate if he was leader. You QT tactic is interesting and sounds good but may have to think about it a little more.

Casablanca

10/09/2013The hoodoo that stands between Bill Shorten and the prime ministership September 10, 2013 - 2:22PM Tim Colebatch If Bill Shorten takes on the job as opposition leader, a powerful hoodoo stands in his path to The Lodge. It is 100 years since anyone who took over as opposition leader after a change of government has gone on to become Prime Minister Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/the-hoodoo-that-stands-between-bill-shorten-and-the-prime-ministership-20130910-2thdl.html#ixzz2eSqyhqSi *** Julia Gillard to end self-imposed exile at two public forums September 10, 2013 - 1:58PM Michael Gordon 'We treated our first woman prime minister disgracefully while she was in office and, now that she has been driven out, it seems she is going to be denied having her achievements recognised,'' Dr Summers wrote after Ms Gillard was removed. Ms Gillard has not been interviewed since a dignified appearance before the Canberra press gallery the night she was defeated by Mr Rudd in a caucus ballot. ''I want to give Ms Gillard the opportunity to share with us what it was really like to be Australia's first female prime minister, her proudest achievements in office, how she dealt with the harsh treatment by media and fellow politicians, and her feelings on being voted out of the job,'' Dr Summers said on Tuesday. ''Ms Gillard served longer as prime minister than Gough Whitlam and she was our most productive leader, passing 590 pieces of legislation, including carbon pricing and DisabilityCare – despite leading a minority government. And she did so while enduring relentless vilification. ''It's time to hear Julia Gillard speak for herself.'' Dr Summers said she would also ask Ms Gillard about her future plans. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/julia-gillard-to-end-selfimposed-exile-at-two-public-forums-20130910-2th25.html#ixzz2eSs6eEsf *** Labor MPs at odds over Kevin Rudd's future September 10, 2013 - 1:30PM Judith Ireland Outgoing frontbencher Brendan O'Connor has ensured that the flames of acrimony continue to burn in the Labor camp, as he called on Kevin Rudd to leave federal parliament. His comments come as it is understood that Caucus would meet on Friday at noon where the leadership would be debated, but not necessarily settled. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/labor-mps-at-odds-over-kevin-rudds-future-20130910-2tgxu.html#ixzz2eSsbmhFl *** Australia decides: politics is a man's game By Ben Pobjie Having withstood the attempts of Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd to make Australia as feminine as they are, the Australian public have voted for blokiness, writes Ben Pobjie. As those of us who listen to talkback and brew our own beer know, the biggest problem in Australia today is the feminisation of our institutions. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-10/pobjie-senate-manliness/4947198 *** Bats not boats for Afghanistan Anthony (who has lived in Afghanistan) 09 September 2013 The United States, a country of cricket illiteracy, spent more than $1 million constructing the Kabul Cricket Stadium, recognising the major impact cricket is having in the country. Australia, one of cricket's 'first nations', has done nothing. It is tragic that, for ordinary Afghans, the vast majority of whom have never considered seeking asylum, Australia's most visible contribution to their country is the message to 'keep away'. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38136#.Ui6uqFK19ZY *** Rineharted by the minehearted (Poems) Strip out my heart, three-personed Gina; As yet but truck, prospect and seek to mine; That we may improve, export and ourselves refine; Your ore, to the US, Europe, and 'specially China http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38158#.Ui6vQFK19ZY *** Even under a conservative government, coal-fired electricity has no future. 10 September 2013, 2.41pm AEST Mark Diesendorf. Coal-fired electricity may have little or no economic future in Australia, a new analysis has found. While the new government seems determined to turn its back on renewable energy, our study shows that even without a carbon price, and even with the assumption that carbon capture and storage will eventually become commercially available, coal may not be able to compete with renewable electricity. http://theconversation.com/even-under-a-conservative-government-coal-fired-electricity-has-no-future-18034 *** What next for universities under Abbott? 10 September 2013, 2.38pm AEST Tony Sheil The incoming education minister, presumably Christopher Pyne with the possible support of Brett Mason in the higher education and research portfolio, will come to one immediate conclusion. On balance, they have inherited a portfolio in good health. Under the previous Coalition government support for research and development in Australia as a proportion of GDP grew from around 1.5% in 2002 to almost 2.0% in 2007. Continued support under Labor saw that proportion move upwards over 2.2% edging closer to the OECD average which is around 2.3%. http://theconversation.com/what-next-for-universities-under-abbott-17950 *** What does a Coalition government mean for Australian aid policy? 10 September 2013, 2.33pm AEST Andrew Rosser Rather than match Labor’s promise to increase aid to 0.5% of GNI by 2017/18, it committed only to maintaining the aid budget in real terms, although it said it would work to achieve the 0.5 target in the longer term. This shift in policy will mean scaling back planned increases in aid spending to the tune of $4.5 billion over the forward estimates. http://theconversation.com/what-does-a-coalition-government-mean-for-australian-aid-policy-17947 *** Tony Abbott: the situational Keynesian 10 September 2013, 6.41am AEST Geoffrey Garrett Tony Abbott became prime minister on Saturday by promising to lead an adult government of competence and stability after years of Labor infighting and backflips. Policy details and bankable pledges were scarce on the ground, and voters apparently didn’t care. Why has Abbott become so circumspect when it comes to reining in the deficit at a time when many in the business world believe mounting public debt is Australia’s Achilles heel? There are four reasons, in increasing order of importance. [q.v.] http://theconversation.com/tony-abbott-the-situational-keynesian-17918 *** As they say in the classics, That's your lot for now. I'm off to have a haircut.

Janet (j4gypsy)

10/09/2013Ad, thank you for the thank you. No-one does what our Lynnie does and we miss her, but we are glad she is resting. (And it is important not to forget that one owes being able to contribute in useful ways to the gentle mentoring of that resting feathery one.) In the next couple of posts am putting up a lot of links that I think haven’t been posted as yet, because shan’t be able to contribute for a few days. (Know Casablanca and others will be linking away. This TPS family seems to be very good at same.) [b]OneTermTony – back to basics[/b] [i]Victoria Rollinson[/i] But Abbott’s impotence isn’t the only reason for my optimism. I also think an Abbott government is going to give the Labor party, and all progressive voters, a golden opportunity to go back to basics, and to question what exactly it is that we want from a progressive government and how we can bring about change without hitting the same hurdles which have damaged progressive reform in the last decade. Here are the lessons we need to learn to get things back on track in time to comprehensively beat Abbott in 2016. Bring on the One Term Tony campaign! http://theaimn.com/2013/09/08/onetermtony-back-to-basics/ [b]My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair[/b] [i]RossLeighBrisbane[/i] But rather than think in terms of elections, rather than thinking in terms of winning or losing, rather than blaming the Murdoch Press, or the leadership tensions in the Labor Party, let’s forget Politics and start the fight for what we believe in, right now! http://theaimn.com/2013/09/08/my-name-is-ozymandias-king-of-kings-look-on-my-works-ye-mighty-and-despair/ [b]TED x – The Media[/b] RossLeighBrisbane “Perhaps the most articulate summation of what’s needed I’ve heard in ages.” [all about the media’s ‘duty of care’ – video] http://theaimn.com/2013/09/08/ted-x-the-media/ [b]With Abbott elected, what’s the left to do next?[/b] [i]Simon2013[/i] So, Abbott won. It’s done, it’s dusted, and there’s nothing else we can do about it. After years of fighting, the left has lost this battle. So, what to do? We lost the battle, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to lose the war. We need to pick ourselves up, dust ourselves of, and get going. Here is how I think we should do it. http://ausopinion.com/2013/09/09/with-abbott-elected-whats-the-left-to-do-next/ [b]Dealing with disaster[/b] [i]Barry Tucker[/i] Console yourself with this thought: Abbott did not win this election, Labor lost it. They lost it in 2009 when they began squabbling among themselves, when PM Kevin Rudd gave up on “the greatest moral challenge of our time”. The Libs started to win from the time Abbott rolled Malcolm Turnbull on the issue of climate change. Abbott inherited one of the most thoroughly organised and professional PR outfits this country will ever see. It has penetrated the mainstream news media (MSM), including the ABC, opinion polls have been rigged, and the powerful Catholic church is on-side. There are wealthy individuals on the Labor side, but the Liberals have the backing of international corporations, billionaires and millionaires. Individually, and even in combination, we had no chance against this machine which used every trick in the book to win power. Read the IPA agenda, including the preamble, to see why the Liberals and their corporate bosses want this power. http://thesnipertakesaim.wordpress.com/2013/09/09/dealing-with-disaster/ [b]Look at Tony now[/b] [i]Ben Eltham[/i] Let’s start with a maxim that seems to have wide currency in 2013: oppositions don’t win elections, governments lose them. It’s a meaningless dogma, of course: the very nature of Australia’s Westminster system of politics means that there can be only one winner, who takes all. Whether the government loses or the opposition wins, the result is still the same. So did Labor lose, or the Coalition win? The answer, of course, is both. https://newmatilda.com//2013/09/08/look-tony-now [b]Is the LNP’s ‘discipline’ code for a different way of doing politics?[/b] [i]Bluntshovels[/i] Much of our esteemed national punditry has been salivating lately about the discipline of the Liberal party campaign, and I suggest, of Abbott himself. But this is not a new phenomena – instead built up over the last three years. Eyes firmly on the prize, lips sealed, leaks plugged and centralised strategy triumphing over local tactics. The LNP campaign machine used this discipline to contrast to the chaotic ALP government, and then campaign. Abbott’s relentless exercise regime has become a proxy for the tight, utterly focused three year operation that Loughnane and his LNP team have run. This is not a new idea, nor unique to the LNP, but it is worth reflecting on, given the results. Abbott in his lycra falls into the same symbolic handbasket as the shiny policy-lite booklet and the constant sloganeering. This campaign did not come out of thin air, nor was it just about the five weeks of the election campaign. Instead, the LNP has been working towards this for some time. http://ausopinion.com/2013/09/09/is-the-lnps-discipline-code-for-a-different-way-of-doing-politics/ [b]The Greens' election: from 'protest party' to protested against[/b] [i]Oliver Milman[/i] The Greens' sought to find a clear point of difference with Labor and the Coalition during the campaign and were provided one with the Rudd government's "PNG solution", under which asylum seekers are processed and resettled on Papua New Guinea. Miragliotta said outrage among progressive voters over asylum seekers "saved" the Greens' campaign, giving the party a clear message to help lure disaffected Labor supporters. But the party, tainted by the last parliament despite its many achievements – dental cover in Medicare and carbon pricing being the two treasured Green-influenced reforms – and swamped by minor parties, saw its vote severely squeezed. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/09/greens-election-protest-party?CMP=ema_632&et_cid=48311&et_rid=7102065&Linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.theguardian.com%2fworld%2f2013%2fsep%2f09%2fgreens-election-protest-party [b]Why Labor Lost[/b] [i]John Lord 2013[/i] The truth of the matter is that my Party is at times its own worst enemy. For the six years it has been in power it governed well in spite of the enormous inconvenience of minority governance. This is indisputable when you look closely at its economic record, the legalisation passed and reformist policy from within a minority framework. Its problems though did not originate from everyday governance. In this sense it has been no better or worse than any other government. Rather its problems stemmed from personality conflict and the pursuit of power. http://theaimn.com/2013/09/10/why-labor-lost/ [b]It Was An Election, Not A Referendum[/b] [i]Jeremy Porter[/i] The election win does not give Abbott a mandate to do whatever he pleases. He can try to repeal the Clean Energy Act. He’s the next prime minister and that’s his prerogative. The Senate has a mandate to review any changes to legislation. It may decide to keep the Act. That’s its prerogative. We are going to hear a lot about mandates in the weeks and months ahead. The next Labor leader would do well to remember what a mandate is and choose their words more carefully than their predecessor. Victory is not a rubber stamp for carte blanche repeal and reform. It’s a mandate to do what’s in the interests of the Australian people. https://newmatilda.com//2013/09/09/it-was-election-not-referendum [b]The New Faces of Democracy[/b] [i]Ben Eltham[/i] Whether you think this is democratic probably depends on your definition of democracy. The idea of preference voting is that it allows voters to express their intentions beyond their first preference of the candidate they want to win. In a sense, then, the Senate is simply the logical extension of that idea. But above-the-line voting, combined with group tickets allocating their own preferences, does throw up some bizarre results. In Western Australia, no fewer than 20 parties polled more primary votes than the Australian Sports Party. Is it right that Dropulich becomes a Senator with 1909 votes, when the Palmer United Party, which looks it won’t win a Senate spot, polled 45,217? https://newmatilda.com//2013/09/10/new-faces-democracy [b]The audacity of the feminine [/b] [i]Matthew Da Silva[/i] Plibersek for ALP leadership will completely set the cat among the pigeons, unbalance the still-uncommissioned Coalition, and get the electorate talking. Let's make another Clover Moore. Sydney, you've come of age! http://happyantipodean.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/the-audacity-of-feminine.html [b]LABOR LEADERSHIP: PLEASE NOT MORE OF THE SAME[/b] [i]boeufblogginon[/i] Albo ticks all the boxes, except of course for the faction box. He’s an extremely competent minister. He communicates brilliantly with not only core Labor people, but with the wider community at large. Albo doesn’t talk in political spin instead he uses language that resonates. He’s not afraid of wearing his heart on his sleeve. He is a truly brilliant communicator. The surgical precision with which Albo dismantled David Speers in a Sky News interview late last week, was masterly. Everyone in the media, old and new, respects him. But most importantly of all, Abbott fears him. Indeed most of the coalition frontbench fear him. That speaks volumes. http://boeufblogginon.com/2013/09/09/labor-leadership-please-not-more-of-the-same/ [b]So the Tele didn’t win it. And how Palmer outfoxed the Australian[/b] [i]Neil Chenoweth[/i] Quite right, it wasn’t the Tele that won it. How absurd. Naturally it was the Tele and the Courier Mail, and The Australian and the Sun-Herald, and all those other terrific publications. The pattern of protestations reads like Rupert Murdoch code for saying, ‘Well of course we did. But we might pick that up again a little later. Shall we?” Except clearly the Tele and its sister titles didn’t win it. The nationwide swing against the Labor Government was weakest in New South Wales, and the swag of western Sydney seats that are the Tele’s natural heartland and which the Libs were confident of winning remained largely in Labor hands. http://neilchenoweth.com/2013/09/09/so-the-tele-didnt-win-it-and-how-palmer-outfoxed-the-australian/

Fiona

10/09/2013Casablanca and Janet, You are both doing a fantastic job. Michael, [quote]As a strategy, do the reverse of what Abbott's Lib's did - ignore the PM. Treat Abbott as an irrelevance, don't give him a soapbox, go after each minister for the matter of ministerial responsibility at hand. Not asked questions, PM Abbott will have nothing to do in QT - he'll look (and not sound, having nothing to respond to) impotent. And that is something that really gets up 'men' like Abbott's noses. [/quote] I really like that idea!

Curi-Oz

10/09/2013If we are not going to change the way in which the Senate is elected (keeping the preferential voting), then it would be advisable to examine the way in which the 'micro-parties' are able to set themselves up and get onto the card. Alternatively, keeping the single digit above the line or full preferential above the line, but changing to an optional preferential voting system that exhausts the vote after a certain number of boxes below the line may be more easily understood by some voters? It would almost certainly reduce the effectiveness of all these micro-party deals that have seen some very odd results this time round. (It may also relieve the worry about missing out a number when there are a large number of 'cats to be herded')

Ad astra

10/09/2013Casablanca, Janet I’ve now read the excellent links you left us today, and have bookmarked many. Thank you for collecting such an informative and insightful compilation. They will serve us well as we contemplate the next phase of political life in the federal sphere, and how we on [i]The Political Sword[/i] should respond. Please keep the links coming. They inform us, shape our views, give us faith, and gird our loins for what is to come.

Libbyx33

10/09/2013Hi Ad & fellow Swordsters, This is the first time I've been anywhere in the media as I've been so devastated by the Abbott win. VOMITOUS Why Australian's are so stupid as to vote against their own best interests is beyond me, but hey, that's democracy. But I'm glad there wasn't the rout many expected, especially here in QLD. Once again a link to a post by the fearless Paul Syvret at the disgraceful Courier Mail. How he keeps his job writing this stuff is beyond me! "In fact, Abbott should now be contemplating that old truism about reaping what one sows and casting his mind back over the past three years of obstructionism. Will he enjoy being on the receiving end of the sort of ruthless parliamentary tactics that the Coalition deployed in relation to issues such as asylum seekers - tactics so opportunistic and cynical that the Coalition even voted against its own policy position on offshore processing in 2011 just to undermine the Gillard government? The irony (or is it just a towering lack of self-awareness?) is sweet in an incoming Prime Minister renowned for his relentless, brutal negativity in opposition now professing to expect supine co-operation from those he destroyed." http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/opinion-coalition8217s-election-victory-doesn8217t-mean-a-mandate-to-do-anything-it-pleases/story-fnihsrf2-1226715384036 Read the whole thing - enlightening! At least some of us are keepoing up the good fight! And by the way, is it too much to ask that Tony Abbott put some clothes on? The front page of the rag shows him in all his lycra glory. YUK!

Janet (j4gypsy)

10/09/2013Finally, a quick collection of further links from Twitterbods. [i]John Pratt ‏@Jackthelad1947 [/i] Womens' vote in play even after Gillard demise. #auspol http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/-2tg66.html … [i]ABC The Drum ‏@ABCthedrum [/i] The Australian public have voted for blokiness in politics, writes @benpobjie #auspol http://bit.ly/1aZ1XUQ [i]Karen Kline ‏@AdvocatesL [/i] Australians elect climate denier who pledges to dump carbon tax http://grist.org/news/australians-elect-climate-denier-who-pledges-to-dump-carbon-tax/#.Ui4quvKRrwx.twitter … via @grist [i]Paul Syvret ‏@PSyvret[/i] http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/opinion-coalition8217s-election-victory-doesn8217t-mean-a-mandate-to-do-anything-it-pleases/story-fnihsrf2-1226715384036 … Mandate schmandate. Possibly the most abused word in the political lexicon. @couriermail Today's column. [i]David Marler ‏@Qldaah [/i] What Labor needs in a new leader and why @tanya_plibersek might be its best bet: http://www.brw.com.au/p/leadership/what_labor_needs_might_best_leader_OAnysm1FOFcZLFiDWQWyJK … #PLIBERSEK16 [i]Benjamin Law ‏@mrbenjaminlaw [/i] For those following the Mirabella-McGowan race, this is fascinating. MT @mbachelard: Inside Indi's indy push: http://inside.org.au/from-little-margins-big-margins-grow/#sthash.Ut4O725N.dpuf … [i]margo kingston ‏@margokingston1[/i] Citizen journo @jansant tells #indivotes campaign story in pictures http://nofibs.com.au/2013/09/09/indivotes-campaign-pictures-jansant/ … [i]Geoff Pearson ‏@GCobber99 [/i] When the reality of an Abbott Government hits home, how will you feel? http://cafewhispers.wordpress.com/2013/09/10/when-the-reality-of-an-abbott-government-hits-home-how-will-you-feel/ … [i]Lucy Stanton ‏@louinoosa [/i] http://m.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/election-2013/carbon-delay-to-cost-billions-warns-business/story-fn9qr68y-1226715692989 … The Murdoch-Abbott government still at it. Obviously plan to use media in order to govern. Think again! [i] John Pratt ‏@Jackthelad1947[/i] @AdamBandt victory was no fluke. #auspol http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/08/adam-bandt-melbourne-victory?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487 … [i]Darin Sullivan ‏@darinsullivan09 [/i] [Pollbludger] Random observations: Scattered thoughts on the Senate, the western Sydney elec... http://bit.ly/13CiZ6C #Auspol #Ausmedia Unfortunately, not back 'til Friday or even Monday as back on the road ... so take care all ...

TalkTurkey

10/09/2013What evil lurks in the minds of men! http://www.newstatesman.com/internet/2013/09/caroline-criado-perezs-speech-cyber-harassment-womens-aid-conference This is a terrible indictment of our whole species. For of course there are also women who would condone, or worse, cheer for these sorts of things to be done to other women. I blame Religion. Its taboos, its prejudices and its punishments.

DMW

10/09/2013That Kudelka knows how to sum it up http://www.kudelka.com.au/2013/09/forget-the-elephant/

Ad astra reply

10/09/2013Libbyx33 Welcome back. I hope you will take heart from the comments here. Paul Syvret is a courageous writer, especially in a Murdoch tabloid. I'm now calling it a day.

Casablanca

11/09/2013 [b]Julia Gillard agrees to two live-audience interviews, tickets sell like hotcakes[/b] PAUL OSBORNE. September 10, 2013 10:30AM Julia Gillard will be the inaugural guest of the Anne Summers Conversations. JULIA Gillard's first public interviews since being ousted from the Labor leadership have sold out in hours. The former Labor prime minister has agreed to two live-audience interviews with author Dr Anne Summers in Sydney and Melbourne in coming weeks. [b]More than 4,500 tickets were sold within seven hours all up. Melbourne sold out in four hours, Sydney in seven.[/b] "Demand for the tickets has been extraordinary. We're now investigating ways we can record or film the events so that Ms Gillard's first public interviews can be made available to a larger audience," said Dr Summers. "We will announce these plans once they are finalised". The famous redhead has kept a low profile since she retired from parliament at the election, after being ousted by Kevin Rudd as Labor leader in June. Twitter: Ricky Onsman ‏@ronsman 4h Very interesting working on the @JuliaGillard / @SummersAnne events today. What being caught in a stampede might feel like, I think.

Casablanca

11/09/2013 1. Julie Bishop opts for payback politics with Steve Bracks sacking September 10, 2013 - 1:52PM. Daniel Flitton So much for governing for all. The Coalition hasn't even been sworn in but has opted for what appears vendetta politics. Steve Bracks was not the first ex-politician to land a prized diplomatic post, and truth be told he won't be the last. Incoming foreign minister Julie Bishop's objection to his appointment to New York in May was not about competency but timing. She claimed the Coalition should have been consulted about the appointment, given Julia Gillard had flagged a September 14 election. Except, as we know, no writs had been issued and the caretaker conventions did not apply. The prime minister changed, the election date too. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/julie-bishop-opts-for-payback-politics-with-steve-bracks-sacking-20130910-2thgn.html#ixzz2eUF4DRO7 *** 2. Twitter blackout for nation's diplomats September 9, 2013. Daniel Flitton Instructions went out from the Foreign Affairs headquarters on Monday for diplomats using official social media accounts aimed at foreign audiences to take a "cautious" approach to telling the world about Tony Abbott's election win. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/twitter-blackout-for-nations-diplomats-20130909-2tgex.html#ixzz2eUGBHP6t *** 3. Now it’s urgent: why we need to simplify voting for the Senate Brian Costar. 09 September 2013 Changes to how senators are elected would improve transparency, make voting easier, and stop parties with scarcely any support slipping into the Senate. See more at: http://inside.org.au/simplifying-the-senate/#sthash.IOy9fQnU.dpuf *** 4. Challenges for the Abbott agenda Norman Abjorensen. 10 September 2013 Despite the pundits, it won't be business as usual under the Coalition. But the Senate will determine much of the style and rate of change. A real challenge for the new prime minister will be to temper the diverse and possibly conflicting ideological impulses in his government. Abbott is by no means a free-market ideologue, yet he will need to assuage those of that bent within his ranks just enough to head off trouble. The allocation of portfolios will indicate where he is giving freedom to move. See more at: http://inside.org.au/challenges-for-the-abbott-agenda/#sthash.StpNgCsE.dpuf *** 5. From little margins, big margins grow The electorate of Indi has been changed forever, write Cambell Klose and Nick Haines from Cathy McGowan’s campaign 10 September 2013 Like many people around Australia, a group of Indi locals watched the past three years of politics – one of the ugliest and most negative in the country’s history – in despair. Feeling alienated from what they saw in Canberra, and from their own MP’s part in it, they began meeting quietly at the Wangaratta Library. So constrained was political discourse in the area – and so strong was Sophie Mirabella’s grip on the seat – that these meetings began with a distinctly clandestine edge, for fear of retribution in participants’ professional or personal lives. This motley group of various political colours became Voice for Indi, and their goal was to begin a conversation that had not been taking place in Indi for a very long time – a conversation about needs, values and political leadership. See more at: http://inside.org.au/from-little-margins-big-margins-grow/#sthash.XS48bWmS.dpuf *** 6. Fresh face sought to command new border patrol operation September 10, 2013. David Wroe, Daniel Flitton Defence is unlikely to choose one of its current top brass to become Tony Abbott's new border protection tsar and will instead promote a fresh face to the rank of three stars. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/fresh-face-sought-to-command-new-border-patrol-operation-20130909-2tgd0.html#ixzz2eUFWJaXx *** 7. What Abbott has in store for Australia David Donovan. 10 September, 2013 5:20 pm ...As for the final question, well, I asked the [unnamed Liberal] MP was whether he thought Abbott was bright. The MP said he did not know how they selected the Rhodes Scholars the year the PM-elect received one, but no, he did not think he was a particularly intelligent man. Abbott’s ruthless, cunning and ambitious, he said, but bright? Not as far as he could see. http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/politics/what-abbott-has-in-store-for-australia/ *** 8. PM Tony about to shape our prosperity PETER VAN ONSELEN, September 07, 2013 12:00AM How will Abbott approach being prime minister from tomorrow onwards? There are three obvious markers we can use, but none of them add much value, in my opinion. The first is the stage-managed Abbott who has worked hard to avoid blowing what he knows is his one chance of becoming PM. An unlikely leader in the first place, Abbott always knew that if he lost the leadership he was unlikely to ever get it back. His performance at the 2010 election earned him three more years in the job, and his brutal politicking during the minority parliament is the primary reason he will achieve a lifetime ambition today. Once emboldened by the authority of incumbency Abbott is likely to step out of his stage-managed shell. It doesn't come naturally to him and it is not what he went into public life to become. It has simply been a means to an ends. The second marker when judging Abbott PM is the one his detractors focus on: the litany of stumbles and offensive remarks in his past. In Abbott's younger days, even by his own admission, he wasn't always a gentleman. He played his university politics hard. His conservatism was less restrained than it is today. Abbott also let his conservatism morph into, at best, moderately sexist rhetoric on issues like abortion and gender equality. At worst he lived up to the modern definition of a misogynist Julia Gillard labelled him with. But none of this provides a signal to the sort of PM Abbott will become. And these are past criticisms, not criticisms of who Abbott now is. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/columnists/pm-tony-about-to-shape-our-prosperity/story-fn53lw5p-1226713525077 *** 9. Rundle mythbusts Abbott’s victory Guy Rundle. 10 September 2013 Part one — busting myths about the election result 1. “Labor’s lowest primary vote for a century!” 2. “It was a landslide.” 3. “It was a total repudiation of the Labor Party.” 4. “Labor will need to totally recondition itself to be electable and this will take a decade.” 5. “Tony Abbott has a mandate, therefore Labor and the Greens should vote up his new legislation.” 6. “Australian democracy is the best in the world.” * Watch out for more mythbusting from our roaming reporter Guy Rundle in the coming days. http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/09/10/rundle-mythbusts-abbotts-victory/ *** 10. Leave now and forever hold your peace Kerry-Anne Walsh. 10 September, 2013 Labor cannot make a clean start while its most divisive MP remains. For the good of the party he professes to love, Kevin Rudd must go. No more stalking, no more self-serving promotion, no more narcissistic selfies. Apart from the goal of restoring the good health of the ALP, it's for the good of democracy that Rudd now recognise, or be forced to, that his political career is over. There is no place for Rudd in a party that needs to refocus outside itself, and become a strong Opposition. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-10/walsh-leave-now-and-forever-hold-your-peace/4947946 *** 11. Teaching the public service to obey its new masters Chris Berg. 10 September, 2013 The Westminster tradition of a politically neutral public service has always been a self-serving fiction, and Tony Abbott may regret not acting early to get the departments on side. Earlier this year, Tony Abbott promised there would be no "night of the long knives" if he won the election. Back in 1996, John Howard dumped six departmental heads - one third of the total - immediately on taking his position as prime minister. It was the biggest overhaul of the public service since federation http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-10/berg-teaching-the-public-service-to-obey-its-new-masters/4947780 *** 12. Labor figures Steve Gibbons, Laurie Ferguson call for Kevin Rudd to quit parliament over leaks Samantha Hawley and Susan McDonald 11 September 2013 A growing number of Labor figures are calling for the former prime minister Kevin Rudd to quit Parliament. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-10/more-labor-figures-call-for-kevin-rudd-to-quit-parliament/4949596 *** 13. Is philosophical enquiry a waste of taxpayers' money? Miriam Cosic. 10 September, 2013 It was startling to have conservative contenders for federal government ridiculing a research project that seeks to understand God. The Coalition says some university research is a waste of taxpayers' money and has highlighted a project that investigates God. Rarefied as it may sound, this kind of study promises insight into the religious and political debates we fight over every day. Not such a flagrant waste after all, argues Miriam Cosic. *** 14. Abbott's own balance-of-power nightmare Annabel Crabb . Updated Mon 9 Sep 2013, 9:08am AEST Tony Abbott is a position player, and he will be - as Prime Minister - very different from the way he was as opposition leader. But there is a price to pay, as there always is for opportunists. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-09/crabb-tony-abbott-prime-minister/4944780 *** 15. Stimulus effect? The Distillery 10 Sep, 7:15 AM After what is now being characterised as six years of business failure by Labor, our business writers are starting to wonder just how growth-friendly the incoming Coalition government will be. One scribe has particularly high hopes for Tony Abbott's infrastructure plans, while another says it won't be nearly enough to compensate for the mining downturn. Jotters are divided on Tony Abbott’s ability to kick-start short-term growth, and on just how much the mining sector will benefit. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/10/politics/distillery-stimulus-effect *** 16. Abbott stumbles into a surplus of luck Stephen Koukoulas10 Sep, 6:59 AM118 US stocks are up about one per cent this morning, Asian stocks were up be an even larger amount yesterday and the economic news continues to show more and more signs of strength. Tony Abbott not only won the election by a thumping margin, but it looks like he won the prize of forming government at a time when the world economy is on a synchronised upswing, commodity prices are trending higher and the current easy domestic policy settings will propel Australian economic growth to a level not yet anticipated by Treasury. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/10/australian-news/abbott-stumbles-surplus-luck *** 17. With Abbott elected, what’s the left to do next? September 9, 2013 • by simon2013 • So, Abbott won. It’s done, it’s dusted, and there’s nothing else we can do about it. After years of fighting, the left has lost this battle. So, what to do? We lost the battle, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to lose the war. We need to pick ourselves up, dust ourselves of, and get going. Here is how I think we should do it. http://ausopinion.com/2013/09/09/with-abbott-elected-whats-the-left-to-do-next/ *** 18. Bishop's slam foreign aid cuts September 11, 2013. Barney Zwartz Australia's Catholic bishops have attacked the Coalition's planned foreign aid cut, saying the proposed $4.5 billion “clawback” was like a rich man chasing a beggar to recover crumbs from his table. John Ferguson, executive officer of the Australian Catholic Social Justice Council, said the policy, unveiled just two days before Saturday's federal election, was unworthy of a civilised nation. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/bishops-slam-foreign-aid-cuts-20130910-2tikq.html#ixzz2eVAnUJin *** 19. Abbott told to drop also-rans from team September 11, 2013. Mark Kenny While the prime minister-elect has promised to retain his opposition shadow ministerial line-up once in power, some insiders believe he should opt for wider changes to put his new government on its strongest footing from day one. But one elder statesman, speaking on condition of anonymity, counselled against that, arguing the new prime minister would damage his credibility if he broke a promise to keep existing frontbenchers in their jobs. Coalition sources told Fairfax Media that at least one senior frontbencher, and a handful of sub-cabinet level shadow ministers, had performed only ''serviceably'' in their portfolios. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/abbott-told-to-drop-alsorans-from-team-20130910-2tici.html#ixzz2eVBfu4Wc *** 20. They haven't seen anything like this in Indi since 1928 September 11, 2013. Tony Wright The country folk of Indi haven't seen excitement like it since the Labor Party accidentally won the seat in 1928 when the Country Party member, Robert Cook, clean forgot to lodge his nomination papers. The Liberals' Sophie Mirabella, having clean forgotten, or having never quite learnt, that country people tend to like their conservatives to be local and non-combustible rather than imported firebrands, now sits nervously, Indi just beyond her grasp. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/national/they-havent-seen-anything-like-this-in-indi-since-1928-20130910-2ticm.html#ixzz2eVBw5vMd *** 21. Bringing a barnyard of crossbenchers to heel September 10, 2013. Tim Colebatch Abbott will have to master the art of compromise because the government does not have a mandate to bully its policies through the senate. By instinct, Tony Abbott is a fighting man. But to run his government successfully, he will have to go down the same path as Julia Gillard. He will have to learn the arts of compromise and negotiation. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/bringing-a-barnyard-of-crossbenchers-to-heel-20130909-2tg63.html#ixzz2eVCbYcPF *** 22. Tony Abbott likened to George W Bush as world considers Australia's new PM September 8, 2013. Josephine Tovey A "compassionate conservative" in the tradition of George W Bush, a "bigoted air-head" and a leader with a markedly different view on a strike on Syria were among the international assessments of Australia's prime minister elect Tony Abbott. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/tony-abbott-likened-to-george-w-bush-as-world-considers-australias-new-pm-20130908-2tdra.html#ixzz2eVDCnsFb *** 23. Liberals: the natural party of government? September 11, 2013. Ross Gittins That born-to-rule cliche about the Liberal Party is firmly embedded in our psyche. Gittins: Who's better at running the economy? Many are pleased the Liberals are back in power. It makes a sort of sense that the party of the bosses is better at running things than the party of the workers. Ross Gittins explains. At last. God's in His heaven and all's right with the world. The rightful rulers of this country are back in charge, so now things can only get better. You think I'm joking? I'm not. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/liberals-the-natural-party-of-government-20130910-2ti5b.html#ixzz2eVDgVkXd *** 24. Election over: Next election campaign begins Michael Wilmore. 10 September 2013 Much has been written over the course of the federal election about the influence of News Corporation on Australian politics. This might seem of acute concern in a supposedly one News Corp' paper town, especially given Adelaide’s status as the birth place of the Murdoch empire. But media influence on politics only comes when support can’t be taken for granted. http://theconversation.com/election-over-next-election-campaign-begins-18015 *** 25. Coalition's election victory doesn't mean a mandate to do anything it pleases Paul Syvret. September 10, 2013 12:00AM JUST what exactly is this thing we call a "mandate'' beyond being arguably one of the most abused words in the political lexicon? Is mandate something to do with marriage equality or the electoral equivalent of a mankini (bright Speedo red, of course) except with a man and a ... Actually, let's not go there. I ask this because to listen to some members of the incoming government, the word seems interchangeable with terms like carte blanche, or perhaps even "open season". Certainly Australia's Climate Change Minister-in-waiting Greg Hunt seems convinced that an election win equals a "mandate" and constitutes, ipso facto, a requirement that all in the Parliament bend over and offer blind obeisance to the new world order. *** [u]Reviews [/u] 26. [i]The Australian Leadership Paradox: What It Takes to Lead in the Lucky Country. Geoff Aigner and Liz Skelton. Allen & Unwin | $29.99 [/i] 10 September 2013. A review by Helen Liu, Swinburne Institute Although prominent individuals can and do play a role in shaping values and practices, that role shouldn’t be overestimated. In a time of increasing uncertainty and complexity, leadership arguably needs to move beyond questions of who the leaders are, and begin to incorporate questions of how to lead with purpose. In their self-proclaimed “naive and ambitious venture,” Geoff Aigner and Liz Skelton set out to transform the way we think about and practise leadership in this country. They suggest that purposeful leadership starts with being alive to four cultural “paradoxes” of leadership. Australians, they argue, are anti-authority and authority-dependent; egalitarian and hierarchical; relational and competitive; and battling adversity and living in prosperity. See more at: http://inside.org.au/better-leaders-or-better-leadership/#sthash.joxrI8Cs.dpuf *** 27. [i]The Cartoon Introduction to Statistics. Grady Klein and Alan Dabney. Hill and Wang | $31.95 [/i] Review: The mystery at the heart of the statistical survey 06 September 2013. Scott Ewing, Swinburne Institute. IT’S DIFFICULT to imagine a world without sample surveys and the statistics they produce. We use statistics to measure our economy and to tell us whether times are good, bad or indifferent. Without statistics we would have no way of knowing whether the prime minister is popular or on the nose. Statistics let television stations, and more importantly advertisers, know which shows are popular and which are not. See more at: http://inside.org.au/the-mystery-at-the-heart-of-the-statistical-survey/#sthash.rSWU56RE.dpuf *** 28. The river in the sky 05 September 2013. Brett Evans Kerry O’Brien’s interview with Clive James was about as good as it gets. http://inside.org.au/the-river-in-the-sky/#sthash.7px2ot9B.dpuf iView: Clive James: The kid from Kogarah. http://www.abc.net.au/iview/#/view/42156 *** [u]Petitions[/u] 29. University student gets 95,000 signatures in petition to scrap Coalition's National Broadband Network plan Jake Sturmer. 10 September, 2013 A 20-year-old Queensland university student is hoping to use the power of the internet to change the new Coalition Government's mind about the National Broadband Network. An internet petition calling for the Coalition to scrap its plans to create a fibre-to-the-node network has had more than 94,500 signatures in just three days. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-10/university-student-petition-to-scrap-nbn-takes-off-online/4949372 *** [u]Today’s Front Pages[/u] Australian Newspaper Front Pages for 11 September 2013 www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm [u]News headlines[/u] http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

Ad astra

11/09/2013Casablanca What a feast you have prepared for us this morning. I have glanced quickly through the menu and tasted a few as starters. The degustation experience awaits me. Thank you for keeping us well nourished while Lyn takes a break. Folks Today we are taking a few days' break on the Mornington peninsula. We will take the iPad and my new Android mini-tablet so we can keep an eye on [i]TPS[/i]. When we are settled into our hotel, and sitting in a comfortable lounge chair, I will take the full meal Casablanca has offered. I won’t be commenting much, just reading and reflecting on where to go from here. Please keep the comments and links coming. We will be back in Melbourne on Friday evening.

TalkTurkey

11/09/2013Ad astra is always our Anchor: Lyn's been our Lookout: We thank her! Now as her watch ends In the Crow's Nest are her friends Gypsy Janet, and now CASABLANCA! :) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Here's a ironic twist, NOW these holy men say this! - http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/bishops-slam-foreign-aid-cuts-20130910-2tikq.html I suspect we will see much more Bracks-type bastardry and Church-type hypocrisy in the near future. Well Australia has earned it, we will all have to wear it. It didn't need to have happened. It is the achievement not primarily of Abborrrtt, nor even of Murdoch, but of Kevin Rudd. I know some think that *J*U*L*I*A* should never have challenged him but don't forget the Caucus supported her, they were collectively fed up with Rudd and he didn't even nominate in the end, he knew he had no support. The MSM beat it up as Stab-In-The-Back and many on our own side swallowed that. I know they did so honestly, but they were working on skewed information. But in any case once voted out the proper and decent thing to do is to defer to the Party. Rudd ... Well... He's an MHR. He has a legal right, and a duty, to serve out the next term in the House. But not in the Labor Party. He's gone. Rotten bastard.

Ad astra

11/09/2013Folks We're now getting on the road.

Michael

11/09/2013If Nick Minchin goes to New York in Steve Brack's place, then at least Abbott's Australia will be accurately personified over there. If Bronwyn Bishop does become House of Representatives Speaker, as is rumored... ordure, ordure.

Michael

11/09/2013Labor MP Nick Champion's "give 'em enough rope they'll hang themselves" theory about Labor not opposing the Coalition gumnint's repeal of Carbon Pricing has superficial attraction, on an Abbott style sandpit level. But it would do more damage to Labor in being seen to abandon party platforms than it would to the gumnint coming a cropper. They'll do that anyway, nothing surer, even if the stars do seem to be aligning for them on the macro-economic front at the moment (see the Stephen Koukoulas 'link 16' above). Labor should abandon nothing! Essentially, in the Lower House the gumnint has a clear run anyway. If Abbott proves better at convincing a rag-tag Senate to pass legislation than he was at getting Windsor and Oakeshott on board in 2010, then more power to him. We'll know what that 'power' is all about - porkbarrelling as never seen before, billions with crackling. Because his policies are so ratty, when they fail as they must, being so ideologically crafted, that failure will be shared, and his gumnint thus characterised, by the weird and wonderful fellow travellers he's got with him slipping down the rabbit hole. The real solution to "no surprises, no excuses" is to point out where the timebombs and the blind-eyes are, to oppose them in that highlighting, and to build Labor's next election campaign on a three years (shudder) record of committed, intelligent Opposition, not 'told you so nyahs nyahs' across the chamber. That's Abbott 'style', and that's what will bring him down, when the surprises all gumnints face can't be palmed away with Labor-bashing excuses.

DMW

11/09/2013Deliciously ironic Sean Keeley ‏@seanrkeeley 54m Surely it's time Australia got its own @PrivateEyeNews magazine? Might I suggest a first cover? #indivotes #auspol http://goo.gl/R78cZW

Curi-Oz

11/09/2013What I can do ... http://curiozcorner.wordpress.com

42 long

11/09/2013Did I hear 1,000 lower house votes found in Indi? Tally found less of them than of the Senate. Something funny or nothing at all?

Bacchus

11/09/2013AEC say a "clerical error" 42 long. Someone incorrectly put a 1 instead of a 2 in a column during the tally, so the story goes... https://twitter.com/Raf774/status/377663987774533632

nasking

11/09/2013 Cheers TT. [quote]The comforting thing is the sure knowledge that she is at peace. [/quote] Yes, a peace for all time...a peace she can't recognise...a peace without life. No more war in her pain-racked body. Peace. Comforts me sometimes...others times I internally rage against the torture that was inflicted upon her by the genes...rage about about the unknowing, the unfair...the callous DNA. Best we can do I guess...in these troubled times...as non-believers. Try to find a smile, a light...comfort...somewhere. Appreciate the comment. N'

nasking

11/09/2013 [quote]Shorten comes across as part intelligent nice guy...part Richo ruthless machine. Not right for now. Not unifying. A real easy target for media.[/quote] Just sayin'

Catching up

11/09/2013I heard Mr. Hunt say earlier today, that Labor cannot thumb it's nose at the referendum of last weekend. What referendum was that. I must have missed it. Labor has had food policies, and there is no need to dump any. What Labor needs to do, is ensure that all of the rescinding legislation on the CEF, and what Abbott intends to replace it with, his Direct Action is debated fully. In fact, both should be debated at the same time. It is not about a tax. It is about how we address the carbon emission issues. The so called tax, needs to be reconnected, to how we deal with man made climate tax. The truth is, that Abbott will dismantle much good legislation, for one reason only, his hatred of anything Labor, especially that which is attributed to Ms. Gillard. In the past, it was the done thing, to improve legislation, or even trim it back. With Abbott, it is to demolish all, and replace it with similar but inferior legislation. Does not make sense. Is expensive and wasteful. That includes Abbott's grandiose PPL. What is in place could just as easy, be amended.

nasking

11/09/2013 The cancer in our politics: [b]Open for business: Lib flacks rush to Canberra to lobby Abbott[/b] MATTHEW KNOTT | SEP 11, 2013 Crikey.com Many of Hawker Britton’s clients are expected to transfer to Barton Deakin, the Liberal-friendly firm set up by former NSW opposition leader Peter Collins in 2009. Barton Deakin’s top man in Canberra is Grahame Morris, an eccentric former chief-of-staff to John Howard who famously called for Julia Gillard to be kicked to death... Peter Costello’s boutique lobbying firm, ECG Advisory Solutions, is another to watch. Former Costello advisers David Gazard and Jonathan Epstein are on board as directors, and ECG already boasts Wesfarmers, Westpac and Serco Asia Pacific on its list of clients. Former foreign affairs minister Alexander Downer remains a partner at Bespoke Approach, the firm he co-founded with former Jeff Kennett adviser Ian Smith and Labor minister Nick Bolkus. Howard government finance minister Nick Minchin recently joined Bespoke, which lobbies for a small, but high-powered, set of clients including Xstrata. http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/09/11/open-for-business-lib-flacks-rush-to-canberra-to-lobby-abbott/ SPEW N'

Michael

11/09/2013Now, if we can just get all the Coalition hangers-on as referred to above to be in Canberra to jump straight in after the whole-of-Coalition meeting to reaffirm Abbott in the leadership, while, say, I don't know, Labor is faraway in caucus in Parramatta, and then have someone add a touch of salmonella to the winners' celebratory cucumber sandwiches... I know, I know, childish, vicious, petty-minded, but, heck, wishful hoping for spoiled cucumber sandwiches and toilet paper supplies running out in the Parliamentary loos is a mile away from 'kicking to death' and 'dumping chaff bags out to sea' with people in them! Bit disappointing if Mirabella's not there for a sanger, but.

nasking

11/09/2013 Sophie Mirabella deserves to lose. We need quality people in politics. With at least some integrity. Mal Brough did not deserve to win a seat for his nefarious actions. Shame there wasn't more choice. The Abbott team and the senate are riddled with problematic characters. Turmoil ahead...for sure. Sad for this country. At the mercy of Murdoch, Packer, Singleton, Rinehart...various religious moralisers...and too many rich mining, media & communications, retail, hotel & casino developing, fast food, cattle profiteering, sports corporatising scum. Some might say 'what's new?'... RAMPANT, IRRESPONSIBLE, TOXIC GROWTH...that's what's coming... again. The exhausted voters will be easily duped and distracted...Americorp proves it. And one day these profiteering puppet masters who are a cancer to this country...the globe...will pack away their Abbott doll...give him a pat on the back...an ORDER OF HOW TO ROYALLY FCK THE MANY...and send him off to America and the Vatican to be HUGGED, LAUDED and SPRUIKED...talons licked... far from the mad Aussie mob who will probably want to lynch him... until history is massaged again...to create another 'Liberal hero' story... and so it goes

nasking

11/09/2013 Just been notified our home loan is down another .25%...actually since Sept 3rd. Now down 2.5% from when Howard left. Thanks ALP minority government...much appreciated. We're watching you Abbott government. Watching you with eyes of bears and dolphins. And mortgage holders. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1KaEYY9Y7eQ

Bacchus

11/09/2013Don't hold your breath Nas' The last interest rate cut under a Coalition government was in Dec 2001...

nasking

11/09/2013 Indeed Bacchus...all talk...little action: CRACK THE SKY...SHAKE THEIR UNIVERSE: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CondYUfSk9o N'

nasking

11/09/2013 If you truly know who killed those children in Syria with gas...who made them suffer so... DESTROY THEM THEIR ALLIES ELIMINATE WITH EXTREME PREJUDICE BRING THUNDER JUSTICE No more hiding for THE WICKED

nasking

11/09/2013 You are what I NEEDED YOU TO BE THIS IS THE PLACE WE HAD TO BE JESU - BIRTH DAY...FROM ASCENSION http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IgJHyM68pnI TICK TOCK REMEMBER TONY...GW AND RUMSFELD GOT IT WRONG CHENEY SLEPT WITH THE DEMONS THINK SEE HIM (Obama)...HER (you adored her once) N'

paul walter

11/09/2013Adds to my store of knowledge, although the error blaming the Greens for the failure of inadequate enviro legislation is a howler.

jane

11/09/2013Liesalot's obsession with repealing the carbon price legislation and the MMRT is getting a reality check. Might also explain Clive Palmer's excursion onto federal politics. http://reneweconomy.com.au/2013/tony-abbott-gets-crash-course-in-carbon-bubbles-88258

jane

11/09/2013Some more unpalatable facts and analysis for Liars barrackers. http://wixxyleaks.com/2013/09/10/the-carnival-is-over-abbott-already-lying-and-even-more-diaz-campaign-disasters/

Truth Seeker

11/09/2013For any that would like to voice an opinion on who should be the next ALP leader, there is a poll on my post [b]"To leakers and whiteanters… STFU!"[/b] :-) http://truthseekersmusings.wordpress.com/2013/09/09/to-leakers-and-whiteanters-stfu/ Cheers :-)

nasking

11/09/2013 TT, I told you recently this was not the FCKN 70s Nup 60s Kinda [b]Creedence Clearwater Revival - Keep On Chooglin' (Live At Woodstock[/b] http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Azt-0StLZOk Keep on :) N'

nasking

11/09/2013 "To leakers and whiteanters… STFU!" LOL SFRIGHT!!! Let's get ALBO in there. TANYA too BE REAL [b]The dreaming tree [/b] http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_mIWg9Ei_rI N'...and he goes..d

nasking

11/09/2013 Mother you thought you were a subject Playing me for fool Always trying to turn me Hoping to rearrange me Madam I can...will always see you...hoping for the save Erupting like vodkano On the brink of 'ceptance Steering in direction...ships passing...close to complex...love Then Broadcasting yer uncertainty Swept into confusion He's always at your door I hear his howl...grandiose perceptions...paranoid reflections Always at your door The shriek mistaken for me Bending oars...cracking floors Blow offs come from beneath Below is smiles like justice in the seat To survive you need his crass clone Born in mirror every day So there it is Mother...Mum I'm pirate on the sea You're Queen's treasure in ship of the line Lights out...whenever he commands I wink...respect,,,if only you had winked to me Instead of Bolt...and hating for the sake of demonising trees,,,frees...me Wrapped like our fish and chips Seemingly tasty N'

nasking

11/09/2013 SHE never knew Never tried [b]Born On The Bayou - Creedence Clearwater Revival [/b] http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pAVhKjsImeI

nasking

12/09/2013 Tells ya some thin' about our mother FCKIN planet when FORTUNATE SON is reduced to http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eTUy9sX1boA

nasking

12/09/2013 I GOT NO PROBS WITH YOU TAKIN' OUT THE BAD OF BAD...THE SCUM OF SCUM...BUT REMEMBER THIS: Some folks are born to wave the flag, Ooh, they're red, white and blue. And when the band plays "Hail to the chief", Ooh, they point the cannon at you, Lord, It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no senator's son, son. It ain't me, it ain't me; I ain't no fortunate one, no, Yeah! Some folks are born silver spoon in hand, Lord, don't they help themselves, oh. But when the taxman comes to the door, Lord, the house looks like a rummage sale, yes, It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no millionaire's son, no. It ain't me, it ain't me; I ain't no fortunate one, no. ... CCR VIA N'

nasking

12/09/2013 Of course we hit Damascus We've seem the dirt...the murders...the.., LA WOMAN...

nasking

12/09/2013 http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6TSZ9imUhxU YEA LET'Z do it REVVIN' UP ALL SYSTEMS ARE GO!!!

nasking

12/09/2013 And so it begins...as said many times before http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=z9IIn3R6_50 HANG ON C'mon girl!!!

nasking

12/09/2013 PATTI SMITH http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ATqt4CgMjBY INDEED

Casablanca

12/09/201312 SEPTEMBER 2013 FOURTH ESTATE 1. Tony Abbott to consider electoral reform amid controversy over Senate by Oliver Laughland Electoral reform for the Senate is an issue that will have to be addressed, Tony Abbott said on Tuesday. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/10/australian-politics-senate-electoral-reform?CMP=ema_632&et_cid=48482&et_rid=7108914&Linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.theguardian.com%2fworld%2f2013%2fsep%2f10%2faustralian-politics-senate-electoral-reform *** 2. How to reform Senate voting in one easy step by Bob Brown The grabbing of Senate seats by micro-party candidates with a handful of primary votes and a manipulated preference flow, while other party candidates with hundreds of thousands of votes are bypassed, is a matter demanding reform. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/how-to-reform-senate-voting-in-one-easy-step-20130910-2ti5a.html#ixzz2eaF4rrRH *** 3. Abbott - the statesman Rudd should have been? by Rob Burgess For economic reasons, for humane reasons, and even for political reasons, Abbott must find a regional solution that raises Australia far above the disgraceful policy put forward in Labor’s dying days. To do so would surprise his critics, and if sold correctly would do minimal damage on the political right, but build considerable capital with centre-left voters disgusted with their own side of politics. That would make Abbott the statesman Rudd ultimately failed to become. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/11/politics/abbott-statesman-rudd-should-have-been *** 4. What went wrong for Labor's NBN by Paul Wallbank The National Broadband Network should have been a powerful political weapon for Labor in this year’s Federal election that it wasn’t tells us much about Australian politics and NBN Co’s flawed management. Some of the credit for moving the NBN off the political agenda should be given to Malcolm Turnbull in successfully dragging the Liberal Party into the Twenty-first century and offering a credible, albeit somewhat inferior, alternative to Labor’s grand project. Despite the Coalition’s plan being inferior, robbed Labor of taking the political high ground with their vision due to the project’s poor execution that featured management failings, inept communications and missed deadlines. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/11/technology/what-went-wrong-labors-nbn *** 5. Coalition takes axe to climate programs. by Sid Maher and Lauren Wilson. PUBLIC servants are drawing up plans to collapse 33 climate change schemes run by seven departments and eight agencies into just three bodies run by two departments under a substantial rewrite of the administration of carbon abatement schemes under the Coalition. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/election-2013/coalition-takes-axe-to-climate-programs/story-fn9qr68y-1226716471498 *** 6. Senates and sensibility: how best to reflect the people's will? by Fergal Davis. Many have accused the Senate electoral system of distorting Australian democracy. Here are three potential reforms http://www.theguardian.com/profile/fergal-davis *** 7. Discovery of 1,000 missing Indi votes puts Sophie Mirabella's seat in peril by Australian Associated Press. A pile of 1,003 votes favouring independent candidate Cathy McGowan were not put into system http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/11/indi-missing-votes-found *** 8. Albanese under pressure to show hand as Bill Shorten seeks leadership by Lenore Taylor, political editor. Labor rightwing faction looks for clarification of leftwinger's intentions as its candidate signals he will launch a bid. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/11/anthony-albanese-bill-shorten-leadership *** 9. Julia Gillard takes up honorary post at the University of Adelaide by Australian Associated Press. Former Australian prime minister returns to the university where she began her tertiary education. "I will ... be co-locating my offices as a former prime minister at the university and working there regularly." http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/11/julia-gillard-adelaide-university-post *** 10. Discovery of 1000 missing votes swings momentum away from Sophie Mirabella by Tony Wright, Bianca Hall and John Elde Liberal frontbencher Sophie Mirabella’s fight to retain her seat of Indi has suffered a setback in sensational circumstances after the Australian Electoral Commission found a large pile of pre-poll votes that significantly tip the scales in the favour of Independent Cathy McGowan. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/discovery-of-1000-missing-votes-swings-momentum-away-from-sophie-mirabella-20130911-2tk9g.html#ixzz2ebDM9KwI *** 11. Vale Keith Dunstan, gentle footy hater, cyclist and master of words by Lawrence Money Keith Dunstan, droll master of words, the Don Bradman of Australian newspaper columnists, has died of cancer at 88 – but, true to his craft, he left a whimsical obituary ready to hit the presses. “Yes, he wrote it a couple of years ago,” said son David Dunstan Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/vale-keith-dunstan-gentle-footy-hater-cyclist-and-master-of-words-20130911-2tklh.html#ixzz2ebEOVse2 *** 12. It's time for Labor to abandon the idea of a carbon tax by Nicolle Flint The proof is in the polling, but will the new opposition be bold enough to see it? Finally, on election night, Labor presented its first clear and coherent message of the campaign. Members and senators acknowledged disunity had damaged the government. They agreed the leadership instability that delivered three prime ministers in three years had caused Labor irreparable harm. Commentators and academics concur. After all, the history of Australian politics proves the electorate will not tolerate a divided government or opposition. Labor under Rudd-Gillard-Rudd is another soon-to-be textbook example of the damage of disunity. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/comment/its-time-for-labor-to-abandon-the-idea-of-a-carbon-tax-20130911-2tkl4.html#ixzz2ebF1m2io *** 13. Dangers in stopping boats, says ex-senator by Barney Zwartz Government proposals to use the military to turn back asylum seeker boats are dangerous and impractical, says Liberal former federal senator Judith Troeth. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/dangers-in-stopping-boats-says-exsenator-20130911-2tkrs.html#ixzz2ebFZB52P *** 14. US diplomat warns Abbott by David Wroe Outgoing US ambassador Jeff Bleich has warned that American taxpayers may tire of footing the bill for global security in a coded plea for Tony Abbott to stick to his promise to boost defence spending. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/us-diplomat-warns-abbott-20130911-2tkrv.html#ixzz2ebGPPE7G *** 15. Gina Rinehart dispute could go to arbitration Billionaire mining magnate Gina Rinehart is seeking to have a bitter dispute surrounding a family trust fund referred to arbitration. The battle between Ms Rinehart and two of her children, John Hancock and Bianca Hope Rinehart, is due to play out over a seven day hearing in the Supreme Court next month. Read more: http://www.watoday.com.au/national/gina-rinehart-dispute-could-go-to-arbitration-20130911-2tjxy.html#ixzz2ebGugmcH *** 16. Rampaging Roy and HG lace up the old boots for grand finals by Peter Vincent Some-time sports fans across the nation will be relieved to hear that Roy & HG will again call this year's footy grand finals. The ABC has announced that the irreverent commentators, who made sport make sense to everyone but proper fans (who after all can look after themselves), will again revive their Festival of the Boot program on Newsradio. The pair will call the AFL grand final on Saturday, September 28, and the NRL decider on Sunday, October 6. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/entertainment/rampaging-roy-and-hg-lace-up-the-old-boots-for-grand-finals-20130911-2tklo.html#ixzz2ebHb6ZIp *** 17. Labor Senator Stephen Conroy labels Kevin Rudd's new leadership-selection rules a 'farce' Senior Labor Senator Stephen Conroy has slammed former prime minister Kevin Rudd's new rules for choosing the ALP's leader, labelling them a "farce". http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-12/stephen-conroy-labels-new-labor-leadership-rules-a-farce/4952532 *** 18. Coalition confirms plans to axe clean energy bank despite pleas to reconsider by Jake Sturmer. The head of Australia's $10 billion green bank is urging the incoming government to reconsider plans to axe it. But it appears the appeals will be in vain, with the likely new climate change minister Greg Hunt confirming to the ABC that the Coalition still intends to scrap the Clean Energy Finance Corporation. Climate researchers are up in arms, slamming the move as short-sighted and labelling the new government as the most anti-environment ever. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-11/coalition-confirms-plans-to-axe-clean-energy-bank-despite-pleas/4952096 *** 19. What Republicans should really learn from Tony Abbott's big win in Australia by Heather Long American conservatives are cheering Abbott's climate-sceptic stance, but they should be looking at how he won women America's conservative press has been salivating over Tony Abbott's win as the new prime minister of Australia. At first glance, he seems like a right-wing dream. Here is a leader who campaigned for an end to the "faddish politics of climate change" (to quote the Wall Street Journal's editorial) by ending the carbon tax. Here is a man who "refused to apologize" for his pro-life and anti-gay marriage beliefs. Here is a man who turned Australia back to its rightful place after six years of progressive government. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/11/us-conservatives-look-to-australia-tony-abbott *** 20. Close relations between PM and foreign minister will help abroad by: Greg Sheridan, Foreign Affairs Editor. THE election of an Abbott government has quite substantially changed Australia already. It may be temporary but the election marks a national shift to the Right. Tony Abbott is no ideologue, but he leads a centre-right coalition. Add to this the right-wing populist votes for Bob Katter and Clive Palmer, and the many small right-of-centre fringe parties, and you get a centre-right primary vote in Australia near 55 per cent. (Given the billions of dollars of taxpayer money spent trying to create a left-of-centre political culture, through the ABC, SBS, many university departments and countless government propaganda arms such as Climate Commissions, Human Rights Commissions and so on, this is a salutary declaration of independence by Australians.) http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion/columnists/close-relations-between-pm-and-foreign-minister-will-help-abroad/story-e6frg76f-1226717191213 *** 21. Lycra or not, Abbott has a mandate by: Niki Savva . CIAO amici. Australia's fifth prime minister in less than six years - the unlikely, unpopular yet eminently electable, successfully rebranded Tony Abbott - is charged with ending the soap opera and all the jokes about the Italy of the Pacific. If Abbott has a mandate, and he unquestionably does and that is unquestionably part of it, then to properly fulfil it, his first duty must be to cut, cut, cut, and cut again the deadwood from his frontbench and promote the substantial talent at his disposal to ensure the first Abbott government is competent, stable and capable of delivering exactly what he promised. Nothing more, nothing less. *** 22. Ziggy's star rises again but NBN path could be tricky by: John Durie. ZIGGY Switkowski's reported imminent posting as chairman of the NBN Co marks an extraordinary resurrection for the man who was dumped unceremoniously by the Telstra board eight years ago. Some would say the board got it wrong at the time but, in any case, after six years in the job he was probably due for a change. While the appointment is being written up as a done deal, it should be noted the new government has yet to even name its cabinet and the NBN post would be a cabinet appointment, so while all the stars are aligning behind Ziggy it's probably a week or two before we get the official confirmation. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/opinion/ziggys-star-rises-again-but-nbn-path-could-be-tricky/story-e6frg9io-1226717209887 *** 23. Albanese ship runs silent over leadership ambitions by Daniel Hurst, Michael Gordon Outgoing deputy prime minister Anthony Albanese is keeping colleagues guessing on his leadership ambitions as the Labor Party mulls launching its first-ever grassroots ballot to decide the top job. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/albanese-ship-runs-silent-over-leadership-ambitions-20130911-2tks6.html#ixzz2ebO7Hv5W *** 24. Get out of our way on huge mines, Abbott told by Jonathan Swan Tony Abbott is under pressure to rush through the biggest coal mining expansion in Australian history, with Queensland Premier Campbell Newman telling the prime minister-elect to ''get out of the way'' in the Galilee Basin. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/get-out-of-our-way-on-huge-mines-abbott-told-20130911-2tks7.html#ixzz2ebP6qIaA *** 25. Votes 'find' may scuttle Mirabella by Tony Wright, Tim Colebatch, (plus a Ron Tandberg cartoon). Liberal MP Sophie Mirabella was reduced to little beyond an outside chance of retaining her north-east Victorian seat of Indi after the Australian Electoral Commission ''discovered'' an extra 1003 votes for her opponent, independent Cathy McGowan, on Wednesday. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/votes-find-may-scuttle-mirabella-20130911-2tkqg.html#ixzz2ebPPymTa *** 26. No quick fix from Coalition. by David Potts Tony Abbott picked a good election to win. There are signs the economy will be on the mend by Christmas, perfect timing for the Coalition to claim the credit. But the real heroes will be the Reserve Bank, for lowering interest rates; and, bless them, international money speculators for pulling down the dollar. That's not all. As the economy picks up, the $30 billion budget deficit will contract of its own accord, in which case meeting its rather modest target of a $6 billion reduction over four years should be a walk in the park for the Coalition. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/money/no-quick-fix-from-coalition-20130910-2th9r.html#ixzz2ebQWpFmn *** 27. Liberal powerbroker Nick Minchin contender to take New York post from dumped Steve Bracks by Josh Gordon, Daniel Flitton and Adrian Lowe Howard-era finance minister Nick Minchin has emerged as a contender to take over as consul-general in New York after Steve Bracks was dumped from the role as one of the first acts of the incoming government. Mr Bracks had been due to fly out on Friday, but was instead told by Department of Foreign Affairs secretary Peter Varghese on Monday that incoming foreign minister Julie Bishop had sacked him. Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/liberal-powerbroker-nick-minchin-contender-to-take-new-york-post-from-dumped-steve-bracks-20130910-2tiaz.html#ixzz2ebS3LOr7 *** FIFTH ESTATE 28. Abbott’s women are thin on the ground by Michelle Grattan If Abbott wanted to promote another woman to his new cabinet he has four in his old outer shadow ministry – Bronwyn Bishop, Sussan Ley, Marise Payne, and Concetta Fierravanti-Wells. There are also three at the parliamentary secretary level – Fiona Nash (deputy leader of the Nationals in the Senate), Teresa Gambaro and Michaelia Cash. But Abbott is likely to put Arthur Sinodinos (who has been a shadow parliamentary secretary) into cabinet as finance minister thus filling the vacancy expected to be created by Mirabella. *** 29. How do we solve a problem like the Senate? by Stephen Morey Australia’s preferential system for the Senate has been distorted by “above-the-line” voting, writing 1 in a box above-the-line for our party of choice, with that party having predetermined all the preferences by means of Group Voting Tickets. http://theconversation.com/how-do-we-solve-a-problem-like-the-senate-18042 *** 30. Taking one for Labor may not be fatal by Bernard Keane A different question is whether the next Labor prime minister is even in parliament. In 17 changes of government since 1992, five of the winners weren’t in parliament when their party went into opposition; a further two were were first elected when they went into opposition. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/11/politics/taking-one-labor-may-not-be-fatal?utm_source=exact&utm_medium=email&utm_content=416390&utm_campaign=pm&modapt= *** 31. Will Tony Abbott be a ‘prime minister for Aboriginal affairs’? by Elizabeth Strakosch Recently, Australian Indigenous policy has been characterised by an unambitious bipartisanship. After one too many dramatic and unsuccessful initiatives, there is a sense of lowered expectations. New prime minister Tony Abbott stands out in this environment, exhibiting a deep commitment to Indigenous engagement and reform. This sits somewhat strangely with his generally conservative social policy positions. http://theconversation.com/will-tony-abbott-be-a-prime-minister-for-aboriginal-affairs-17985 *** 32. 13th Fraser Lecture – Delivered by Bill Shorten MP Victoria Rollison tweeted: Victoria Rollison ‏@Vic_Rollison 6h Ok, I read Shorten's Fraser Lecture speech delivered in August and it's very impressive. Leader? Not sure... On 26 August 2013, Bill Shorten delivered the 13th Fraser Lecture on the topic “The Battle of Ideas and the Good Society”. The video begins with an introduction from Andrew Leigh, and concludes with Bill taking questions. A full transcript of the speech is over the fold. http://www.andrewleigh.com/blog/?p=4775 *** 33. Tweet: Peter FitzSimons ‏@Peter_Fitz 12h Fair point, @Tony_Burke: The 1st action of our govt was to ratify Kyoto. The 1st action of Abbott govt. was to recall Steve Bracks. #auspol *** 34. We're calling it: This is the best sneaky-move-by an outgoing Minister. Ever. By MAMAMIA NEWS On Friday last week, Labor’s Minister for Immigration, Tony Burke was starting to pack up his office. Presumably the boxes had already been delivered, staff were finishing up on final emails and preparing to move to the Opposition corridors. On election eve, Minister Burke knew that his party was all but certain to lose in the next day’s polls. So he decided to use the final minutes of his ministerial power to do something a little bit wonderful. http://www.mamamia.com.au/news/asylum-seekers-sneaky-move-minister-tony-burke/ *** 35. On politics and strategy by Paul Barratt ...“standing for something” forces a political party to think strategically. This is because, having decided that it embodies certain values and stands for a particular view of the world and Australia’s place in it (”the vision thing”), the party is obliged to try to persuade as many as people to see the world their way. In this way it is reshaping the battlefield to its own advantage, and making it much easier to convince people of the virtues of its individual policies. Margaret Thatcher understood that – I heard at the time that she, on a visit to Canberra while the Coalition was flopping about in Opposition, gave them stern counsel: “You should stop reading the opinion polls, decide what you stand for, and convince people to vote for that”. http://aussieobserver.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/on-politics-and-strategy.html *** PERIODICALS 36. Why we still need the Senate by Binoy Kampmark It is part of the stream of Australian politics that the party of the Lower House assumes, with all genuine naivety, that their wishes embody the sovereign will. This has come to be called a 'mandate', presuming that mandates can only issue from numerically vast numbers. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38160#.UjB-CVKbZZY *** 37. Border protection transparency under Abbott by Tony Kevin We will see under the Abbott Government a tougher philosophy and administration of Australia's policing of its northern maritime borders against unauthorised boat people. It cannot be assumed numbers of arrivals will quickly fall to zero, though they are already trending downwards since Kevin Rudd announced in July that all irregular maritime arrivals will be processed in PNG or Nauru and resettled offshore. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38159#.UjB-_FKbZZY *** 36. Why Australia hates asylum seekers by Christos Tsiolkas. (Long read 6800 words) Our governments and press have demonised boat people for 15 years. Organisations like the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre worry they’re fighting a losing battle. “I received a text from one of my colleagues, and he wrote, I feel like we have failed,” says Kon Karapanagiotidis. “I texted back and wrote, Yeah, so do I.” It is a few days after Prime Minister Kevin Rudd announced his “PNG solution” to his latest political crisis, whereby no asylum seeker arriving by boat will be settled in Australia. My friend and colleague Karapanagiotidis, the founder and CEO of the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre (ASRC), shows a rare moment of doubt and confusion. But it doesn’t last long before he’s thumping the table, remarshalling his forces. http://www.themonthly.com.au/issue/2013/september/1377957600/christos-tsiolkas/why-australia-hates-asylum-seekers *** 38. ARISE, BILL SHORTEN by PoliticOZ http://www.themonthly.com.au/node/10672 *** 39. Where to for the Labor Party? By Mungo MacCallum. ... All the obvious candidates have heavy union connections and the general mood appears to rely on the mindless cry that Labor has to get back to its roots – however withered and moribund those roots might be. And if that is to be the outcome, nothing substantial will change. New Labor will just be old Labor with a bit of a face lift; one of those machines you sometimes see in a museum, salvaged from another age and painstakingly restored so it still functions but performs no useful purpose. http://www.themonthly.com.au/blog/mungo-maccallum/2013/09/09/1378691816/where-labor-party *** PETITIONS 40. The Liberal Party of Australia: Reconsider your plan for a 'FTTN' NBN in favour of a superior 'FTTH' NBN A Petition Pertaining to the Future of Australian Broadband: 150,000 SIGNATURES AFTER ONLY A COUPLE OF DAYS To Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull, the Liberal Party of Australia, the Senate and whom it may concern, This petition is designed to highlight Australia’s desire for a superior ‘Fibre to the Home’ (FTTH) broadband solution, rather than the Coalition’s proposed ‘Fibre to the Node’ (FTTN) solution. https://www.change.org/en-AU/petitions/the-liberal-party-of-australia-reconsider-your-plan-for-a-fttn-nbn-in-favour-of-a-superior-ftth-nbn?utm_source=action_alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=33919&alert_id=JpjmYtZqFC_UphxvIVunx *** TODAY’S FRONT PAGES Australian Newspaper Front Pages www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm NEWS HEADLINES http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

Casablanca

12/09/2013Former News chief unfazed over election criticism AAP Former News Corp Australia boss Kim Williams does not think the company's perceived bias towards the Coalition during the election campaign will damage the company's brand. In his first appearance since abruptly exiting News Corp Australia last month, Mr Williams said campaigning journalism during elections was quite common. ''I saw nothing in the last election that was [brand damaging],'' he told a business leaders forum in Brisbane. ''I mean, there may have been a greater degree of energy in that campaign, but whatever commercial rewards that will be harvested from that will be through the response of consumers and their products or not.'' Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/former-news-chief-unfazed-over-election-criticism-20130911-2tktj.html#ixzz2ebtBhi7Z

Janet (j4gypsy)

12/09/2013Casablanca: you are doing a STUNNING job! :). I fear you may not be sleeping :-). Quick request: if you are on Twitter, could you let me know your twitter handle - or follow and advise me, especially if you are not using casablanca in handle? I'm Jan Mayuddin@j4gypsy.

Pappinbarra Fox

12/09/2013Labor needs to respond to the Government's proposed abolition of the Carbon Price on the grounds of whcih is the best policy not because the government is the government (cf mandate). Which is the best policy? It seems clear that the carbon price and market are considered superior to the Government proposal and Labor should stick to their guns on this one. In all likelihood the abolition will pass anyway if the wingnuts do get control of the senate but the opposing view is important to be maintained. I suspect that Abbott will abolish the carbon price and then do nothing.

Pappinbarra Fox

12/09/2013Oh by the way - my congrats to the swordsters who have taken up the links regime while Lyn is on holidays.It is excellent, as was Lynn's. It must be a lot of work! I also believe that the sword is needed now more than ever.

Ken

12/09/2013Where is Rudd? He is still ALP leader. What he announced is that he won't contest the next leadership ballot. I know it is difficult in the circumstances but while he remains leader he shouldn't allow Abbott to get away with anything. Obviously he shouldn't jump in on his own but after consulting with people like Albo and Shorten - the problem, of course, is whether Rudd is capable of that! But I think it almost worse for the ALP to be silent during this period.

Pappinbarra Fox

12/09/2013Further to the Labor position on carbon pricing. The Labor party must not roll over on this one. When they regain office a helluva lot more will need to be done to overcome the lost time while Abbott let the planet warm unhindered. History will judge the like of Abbott and his failure to properly address the situation.

Ad astra reply

12/09/2013Casablanca Thank you for another comprehensive set of links. It was not until late yesterday afternoon that I finished yesterday's interesting collection, and it will be the same today as we will be out and about all day. I did enjoy yesterday's links; there was such a variety of news and information. I look forward to reading today's links before dinner tonight. So I'll sign off for the day.

Michael

12/09/2013Carbon pricing will not be repealed. As to Labor being "silent", heard anything from Abbott and co lately? I reckon they (and he) suddenly understand what they've just bitten off, and know that they have nothing to chew it with. Howard's Thirds will become the "worst gumnint in Australian history". I'd say "just watch", but we won't be able not to! Can't find it right now, but the Institute of Chartered Accountants, or some other such financially 'dry' mob, have recommended that carbon pricing NOT be dropped, if only because of unintended consequences whacking the business community. Others elsewhere have commended what carbon pricing has already achieved and set in train in terms of business thinking - to require re-thinking/reorganising, is not a good thing to throw into business's planning. Who knows if Abbott is listening?! He's down a burrow somewhere.

TalkTurkey

12/09/2013Geez. Yous Gals. Tweety, Gypsy, Casablanca. Mao Tse-Tung said, Women hold up half the sky. Well women are sure doing their share of the hard yards on The Sword. As when poor Atlas handed over the world for Hercules to hold for a while, hardly a star moved in the firmament as Lyn took Blog Service Leave and handed over to you other two. Strong women writers and workers especially make me not just grateful but very proud, it is testimony that here there is no misogyny, because I'm sure if it reared its ugly head here it would be swiftly decapitated with a spade. Perhaps the fact that I even mention your gender is a form of discrimination, Oh well, I'm a redhead, we are discriminated too, not for, not against, just ... discriminated. We do it to ourselves anyway, how not to notice a real redhead? Or someone's gender? But there's no harm intended. But it's women who have the patience to knit ... and crochet ... and perform many such humble repetitive tasks ... and I really honour that. Thank you all 3. And what a teacher you are Lynnie. But I do SO wish *J*U*L*I*A* had been there as PM. Women would have ended up flocking to her. Tears. I'm as soft as raw egg-yolk, and I puncture easy too. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Hey and who remembered? Tomorrow (Friday!) 13th September is a BIG Anniversary ! [b]THE POLITICAL SWORD TURNS 5 ![/b] Happy Anniversary Ad astra. You have created something wonderful. And ahem the very next day is my own 3rd anniversary of writing here. And I feel the better, stronger, calmer, angrier, more powerful as a writer for the opportunity to write on this honest open goodwilled blog on this new People's neighbour-making medium we call the Fighting 5th Estate. You ALL make me proud. Thanks All.

marks

12/09/2013While I have no doubt that Rupert Merde-och's campaign did have an effect, I suggest that there are some things to think about. First of all, there were some negatives of its own making that Labor and Labor alone should take responsibility for. These being the party disunity and some of the flip flopping on issues dear to our hearts. Next, the actual 2PP swing was about 3.5%. So, if we arbitrarily said that Rupert's effect was the same as the self inflicted wounds, then the actual effect of the MSM campaign may have been about 1.8% of the 2PP vote for Labor. Take that in context of the loss of about 2% for the Greens who Rupert said should be destroyed, and who campaigned in his various outlets for that very reason, and I don't think I am far off. The good news is this. Rupert campaigned long and hard against both the ALP and the Greens, he pulled out all the stops, nothing too low or to nasty was left out of his attacks....and he managed about 2% damage. Bad, but not terminal in terms of volatility of votes around election time. Furthermore, circulations of his newspapers are going down year on year, so it is quite likely given the rate of decline of newspaper readership that even if he repeats his nastiness, his influence next election would be lucky to be 1.5%...which he already has. New voters coming on are from a cohort that simply do not read newspapers, old voters, having fallen of the perch RIP will not be replaced by people listening to Murdoch. The ALP, and Greens will be far better concerning themselves with addressing internal problems.

Casablanca

12/09/2013Yabba, yabba, do!! and all other WTTE!!!! Sophie Mirabella withdraws from frontbench contention Judith Ireland Liberal MP Sophie Mirabella has pulled herself out of contention for a frontbench spot in Tony Abbott's new government as her future in Indi remains unclear. Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/sophie-mirabella-withdraws-from-frontbench-contention-20130912-2tlon.html#ixzz2eekYsz1F ***

Ad astra reply

12/09/2013marks Welcome to The Political Sword family. Do come again. Thank you too for your very astute comment, which makes a lot of sense. Maybe Murdoch is losing his potency, and will have lost a lot more by the next election. If his influence decays as his print empire is, by then he might almost be a spent force.

Jason

12/09/2013Antony Green ‏@AntonyGreenABC 6m Good article on double dissolutions by Professor Anne Twomey http://bit.ly/1b8UJh8 #ausvotes

Algernon

12/09/2013Mirabella looks like she'll lose her seat, yippee. Last time it was Wilson Tuckey losing his and not seeing it coming. Indonesia rejects Abbott's policy on asylum seekers. Turnbull doesn't like a partition with 200000 signatures on broadband. Abbott on the other hand has said nothing for 5 days. One can only hope the wheels fall off pretty quickly.

TalkTurkey

12/09/2013Fiona Katauskas ‏@FionaKatauskas 8m GROG'S ON FIRE! Top stuff from @GrogsGamut http://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics/2013/sep/12/joe-hockey-wants-external-auditor …

DMW

13/09/2013This is sad/discouraging and, oh I don't know ... awful [b]Kelly set to concede defeat in Eden-Monaro[/b] Ross Peake @ Canberra Times http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/kelly-set-to-concede-defeat-in-edenmonaro-20130912-2tnpf.html

Casablanca

13/09/2013Best behaviour at Lodge handover Daniel Hurst [quote]Rudd stuck to the family theme - usually a safe ice-breaker - by asking whether Abbott's three adult daughters would be living at The Lodge too. "The short answer is yes," Abbott said, "because they don't want to leave home until such time as they get married." Before Abbott had finished the sentence, Rudd chuckled. "I - I know that feeling." They then turned their mind to The Lodge - a place that is about to undergo repairs and therefore is unlikely to house Abbott and wife Margie - or even their daughters - for at least a year. (Abbott may follow in the footsteps of John Howard and settle into Sydney's Kirribilli House.)[/quote] Daggy Dad Tones obviously missed the spread in one of the trendy mags, well before the election, where the girls let the cat out of the bag. The chatty one said that she and her sister would not be living at Kirribilli [quote](NOTE: Kirribilli NOT the Lodge)[/quote] and that her sister would be living with her boyfriend. Maybe we should refer to Kirribilli House as Downton Abbey Read more: http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/best-behaviour-at-lodge-handover-20130912-2tnc1.html#ixzz2egkqK67X

Casablanca

13/09/2013[u]LINKS:[/u] 13 September, 2013 [u]FIFTH ESTATE[/u] 1. From Simple Disillusion to Double Dissolution [i]by: [/i]Anne Twomey [i] Before the election, Tony Abbott ruled out negotiating with independents or minor parties if he didn’t achieve a majority in the lower House. But the pain Gillard experienced in bargaining for the votes of three independents in the House of Representatives is likely to be magnified for Abbott in getting six or more votes from a motley crew of micro-parties in the Senate. Is there another path? Abbott previously threatened to call a double dissolution if his legislation was blocked in the Senate. How feasible and likely is this? [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://blogs.usyd.edu.au/cru/2013/09/from_simple_disillusion_to_dou_1.html *** 2. Indi Votes Update [i]by: [/i] Dan Smith @indivotesupdate [i] This bot will send an update for the Indi vote count if it sees the AEC Virtual Tally Room results change. Not affiliated with the AEC. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] https://twitter.com/indivotesupdate *** 3. Rudd Wants to Be Leader Again [i]by[/i] Dr Craig Emerson [i] Among the lowlights of the election campaign, few were as low as the two leaders' statements of anxiety about Chinese investment in Australia.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://craigemersoneconomics.com/media/2013/9/12/column-in-the-australian-rudd-wants-to-be-leader-again *** 4. An Open Letter to Bob Day [i]by:[/i] Victoria Rollison [i] It does trouble me that many Australian voters are so uninformed that literally the sum total of campaign research carried out by them was to read the two words ‘Family First’ and to think ‘that sounds good’. And this is why I think it’s important that you be made accountable for your values, even if it’s subsequent to the public’s opportunity to choose whether you are a suitable representative for the interests of Australians [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://theaimn.com/2013/09/12/an-open-letter-to-bob-day/ *** 5. “There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.” – Aldous Huxley [i]by:[/i] Rossleigh Brisbane [i] When John Howard contested the 2007 election, he stood on his interest rate record. The Interest rates had been – on average – lower than when Labor was in office. After Labor’s election, interest rates didn’t climb as had been predicted by the Liberals, so the mantra changed. We were told that interest rates would be even lower if we didn’t have a Labor Government. At some point, this changed again. Low interest rates become a sign that the economy was in crisis. They were a sign of the weakness in the Australian economy. Which, to some extent, is true. As to how much that weakness is the result of Government policy and how much a result of the high Australian dollar is a matter that can be debated, but the fact remains that the Reserve Bank increases interest rates to slow down an overheating economy and reduces them to stimulate a flagging economy. Depending on what else is happening, a fall, rise or no movement at all may be a cause for concern or celebration.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://theaimn.com/2013/09/12/there-are-things-known-and-there-are-things-unknown-and-in-between-are-the-doors-of-perception-aldous-huxley/ *** 6. Whose Fault Is It? [i]by:[/i] Rossleigh Brisbane [i]I can’t help but feel we’re going to be spending a disproportionate amount of time talking about “blame” in the next year or so. Reflection and working out what went wrong has its merits, but “blame” is something else altogether. For example, I notice various letters in the papers blaming Bill Shorten for backing Gillard, for changing back to Rudd, for being a “faceless” man and for being too ambitious. (I still maintain that a Minister cannot be “one of Labor’s faceless men” no matter how much he wheels and deals; it’s an oxymoron.) Whatever your views on Bill Shorten, I suspect that the more he’s blamed, the more he’ll seek to deflect blame, so while it may feel good to find a villain or a scapegoat, things are rarely one person’s fault. However, I don’t want to concentrate on Labor’s soul-searching. My purpose here is to look to the future, and to remind everyone that Abbott was elected to deal with the Labor Government’s perceived shortcomings.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://theaimn.com/2013/09/11/whose-fault-is-it/ *** 7. Murdoch hasn’t finished yet. [i]by:[/i] Michael Taylor [i]Did you notice anything during the election campaign? I noticed that the ferociously rabid Murdoch media unleashed itself as the most persuasive and effective media in the country for promoting the discourse that Tony Abbott had evolved into something worth promoting. And of course, protecting. I have no doubt that their murderous attack on the Labor Government and its leader, coupled with the elevation of Abbott to the status of living god, was enough to swing the election [/i] [i]Read more:[/i]. http://theaimn.com/2013/09/11/murdoch-hasnt-finished-yet/ *** 8. Tony Abbott and our new Murdochracy [i]by:[/i] David Donovan [i]IT GOES WITHOUT SAYING that Tony Abbott is one of the poorest quality prime ministers in Australia’s political history. You need to go back to Billy McMahon to find a leader with anywhere near the same sort of lowbrow politics, lazy disposition and fundamentally dishonest nature. Of course, we have covered all these aspects of Abbott’s “character” ‒ and other deficiencies ‒ on IA at great length, as have a great many other websites. We don’t intend to go back over all that old ground today. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.independentaustralia.net/2013/politics/tony-abbott-and-our-new-murdochracy/ *** 9. Media mud chuckers [i]by:[/i] Michael Taylor [i]There could be another election in six months if Abbott calls a DD. Whoever leads Labor going into it needs to be squeaky clean or the media will go in for the kill. If he is one of the so-called faceless men he’ll be murdered for it. If he or she was openly a Rudd or Gillard backer they’ll be exposed as someone who helped destroy the other’s leadership. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://cafewhispers.wordpress.com/2013/09/12/media-mud-chuckers/ *** 10. What would a democratic Senate look like? [i]by:[/i] davidjackmanson [i]The recent election results for the Australian Senate are an undemocratic farce. Two parties, each with with less than 1% of the vote, are going to win seats ahead of other parties with more votes, and another party will win a seat only because they had a misleading name that fooled about 175,000 people into voting for it. Today I’m going to look at how this happened, and how we can start thinking about what a democratic Senate could look like. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://ausopinion.com/2013/09/12/what-would-a-democratic-senate-look-like/ *** [u]FOURTH ESTATE[/u] 11. We will reject Abbott's policy on asylum seekers: Indonesia Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa [i]by:[/i] David Wroe [i]Tony Abbott faces fresh obstacles from Jakarta on his asylum-seeker policies after Indonesia's foreign minister appeared to reject Coalition plans to pay bounties for information that helps disrupt. [/i] [i]Read more:[/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/we-will-reject-abbotts-policy-on-asylum-seekers-indonesia-foreign-minister-marty-natalegawa-20130912-2tmkw.html *** 12. We need help getting divorced, not staying married [i]by:[/i] Bronwen Clune [i] Australia’s new prime minister Tony Abbott did more than most to insult the “institution of marriage” in the lead up to the election when the Coalition announced that it would give $200 relationship vouchers to couples when they registered their "intention to marry". [/i] The vouchers were the idea of Kevin Andrews, shadow minister for families up until the election, who has said that marriage breakdown is a greater threat to society than climate change or radical Islam. [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/11/help-getting-divorced-not-married?CMP=ema_632&et_cid=48676&et_rid=7108914&Linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.theguardian.com%2fcommentisfree%2f2013%2fsep%2f11%2fhelp-getting-divorced-not-married *** 13. Wasted food is world's third-biggest carbon emitter after China and US: UN [i]by:[/i] Reuters [i] The food the world wastes accounts for more greenhouse gas emissions than any country except for China and the United States, according to a United Nations report. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-11/un-says-wasted-food-is-third-biggest-carbon-emitter/4952126 *** 14. Malcolm Turnbull rejects online petition to keep Labor's NBN plan, saying democracy has spoken [i]by:[/i] ABC [i]The Coalition has hit back at an online petition to scrap its National Broadband Network plan, saying the election victory gives it a mandate to implement its policy. The petition, launched earlier this week by Queensland university student Nick Paine, has gathered more than 200,000 signatures.[/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-12/malcolm-turnbull-labels-anti-nbn-petition-reckless/4954858 *** 15. Bill Shorten confirms tilt for Labor Party leadership, believes ALP can win next election [i]by:[/i] Simon Cullen [i]"I want to lead the rebuilding of our movement and to take the fight up to the Coalition in Australian politics," Mr Shorten told reporters in Melbourne.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-12/bill-shorten-confirms-tilt-for-labor-party-leadership/4953866 *** 16. Indonesia to reject Tony Abbott's 'problem' asylum seeker boat plan [i]by:[/i] George Roberts [i]Indonesia's foreign minister Marty Natelegawa told a meeting of his parliament's foreign affairs commission that Mr Abbott's "policy about people smuggling" was a "problem" that Indonesia had to manage. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-12/indonesia-rejects-abbotts-asylum-plan/4954574 *** 17. Indonesia expert says Coalition plan to buy back asylum seeker boats will sour relations [i]by:[/i] George Roberts [i]But Professor Hikmahanto Juwana of the University of Indonesia says the proposal is offensive and will not be popular with Indonesia's government. "It will make Indonesia-Australia relations sour because, of course, Indonesia will not readily accept what is proposed by Australia," he said. Professor Hikmahanto says paying bounties will encourage a culture of vigilantism. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-26/indonesia-expert-says-coalition-asylum-policy-offensive/4913322 *** 18. Give the people a reason to join the ALP [i]by:[/i] Bruce Hawker [i]Far from being divisive, allowing branch members to help choose the next Labor leader would modernise the party and enable it to attract new blood, writes Bruce Hawker. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-12/hawker-give-them-a-reason-to-join-the-alp/4953958 *** 19. Prime Minister for Indigenous Affairs? Hardly [i]by:[/i] Chris Graham [i] One problem: no-one, including within the media, ever stopped to ask Aboriginal people if they actually wanted a "Prime Minister for Indigenous Affairs", and in particular whether or not they wanted Abbott. As it turns out, they apparently don't. Believe it or not, there is a simple way to get a broad feel for Aboriginal voting aspirations. All you need do is look at booths around Australia that are identifiably Aboriginal.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-12/graham-prime-minister-for-indigenous-affairs/4951900 *** 20. Can the Coalition's NBN keep pace with change? [i]by:[/i] Emma Alberici [i]In the early 90s, we couldn't grasp the revolutionary potential of the World Wide Web. Two decades later, the Coalition is brushing off the need for faster download speeds, writes Emma Alberici. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i]http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-09/alberici-can-the-coalitions-nbn-keep-pace-with-change/4931864 *** 21. Head-to-head contest to lead Labor [i]by:[/i] Michael Gordon [i]Bill Shorten will promise reforms to make it easier for supporters to join the Labor Party and influence policy decisions in his attempt to succeed Kevin Rudd and draw a line under Labor's era of leadership tensions and internal divisions. [/i] [i]Read more:[/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/headtohead-contest-to-lead-labor-20130912-2tnnx.html#ixzz2egiUe5kl *** 22. Climate sceptic MP Dennis Jensen wants to be science minister [i]by:[/i] Jonathan Swan [i]Coalition MP Dennis Jensen, who is a vocal climate science sceptic, has called on Prime Minister-elect Tony Abbott to appoint him as science minister. "At the moment to be honest I'm feeling under-utilised," said Dr Jensen, the member for Tangney in Western Australia, who has a master's degree in physics and a PhD in material science.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/climate-sceptic-mp-dennis-jensen-wants-to-be-science-minister-20130912-2tltt.html#ixzz2egio5ZEr *** 23. Best behaviour at Lodge handover [i]by:[/i] Daniel Hurst [i]"It's a ... you and Margie will find this a good place to make a home," Rudd, still caretaker prime minister, assured his replacement, yet to be sworn in. "Well it's an honour to be here - an extraordinary honour, very few people obviously have that honour," Abbott replied, before trailing off, "and yeah; very interesting." [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/best-behaviour-at-lodge-handover-20130912-2tnc1.html#ixzz2egkQNr00 *** 24. Joe Hockey wants an external auditor – I volunteer for the job [i]by:[/i] Greg Jericho [i]On Sunday morning, the incoming Coalition treasurer announced to Channel Nine that he was going to audit the Treasury’s forecasts I hereby volunteer to do the job of external auditor. How can I promise [all] this? Because a major review of Treasury’s forecasts with external people to test the robustness of their methodology was done just 10 months ago, in December 2012, and released publicly in February this year [see: http://www.treasury.gov.au/PublicationsAndMedia/Publications/2013/Forecasting-review] And this was no small thing. The “Review of Treasury Macroeconomic and Revenue Forecasting” was only the third such review in the past 20 years (the others were done in 1995 and 2005). It’s bizarre that it slipped his mind. It's bizarre that the major review of Treasury's forecasts has slipped Joe Hockey's mind. Dr David Chessell, the chair of Access Capital Advisers, headed the review. The review team included Peter Crone, the chief economist and director of policy for the Business Council of Australia; Malcolm Edey, the RBA’s assistant governor (financial systems); and Dr Lynne Williams, who is on the Business and Economics Board of the University of Melbourne. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics/2013/sep/12/joe-hockey-wants-external-auditor *** 25. Grogonomics [i]by:[/i] Greg Jericho [i]A list of recent articles by Grog is at the following address:[/i] http://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics+world/australia-economy *** 26. Abortion rights under threat from 'Zoe's law', say Australian women's groups [i]by:[/i] Bridie Jabour [i]A debate on "Zoe's law" – which could classify a foetus as a person in New South Wales – has been postponed until next week after women's lobby groups asked for more time to brief MPs on the possible consequences. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/profile/bridie-jabour *** 27. Queensland parliament delays endorsing Barry O'Sullivan for Senate [i]by:[/i] Bridie Jabour [i]Barnaby Joyce’s replacement in the Senate has been denied endorsement by the Queensland parliament because he is under investigation by the state’s corruption watchdog. In May Barry O’Sullivan, Queensland’s former Liberal treasurer, won preselection to fill the Senate vacancy created by the senior National party politician’s move to the lower house.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/12/queensland-parliament-delays-endorsing-barry-o-sullivan-for-senate *** 28. Anthony Albanese: will he choose the road less taken? [i]by:[/i] Katharine Murphy [i]Anthony Albanese has never pitched or positioned himself as a future Labor leader: it really wasn’t part of his life plan. But events have conspired to make the New South Wales leftwinger consider a significant road not taken - to contemplate whether he wants to be (and has the requisite qualities to be) the man up the front, rather than a person of the backroom. Rebuilding will be a huge task: Labor’s exhausted MPs right now need a combination of pastoral care and brute force - and Labor needs to disrupt Abbott’s steady-as-she goes transition to the prime ministership if the party is to avoid the spectre of a decade in the political wilderness. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/12/labor-leadership-will-anthony-albanese-choose-the-road-less-taken *** 29. Meet Clive Palmer, Tony Abbott’s new nightmare best friend [i]by:[/i] Neil Chenoweth [i]Tony Abbott has a nightmare new best friend: “That’s politics. We’ve got two Senate seats, there’s nothing they can do without us,” Clive Palmer says. The conservative insurgency now being waged by Palmer against the Liberals and Nationals has its origins in a rail line dispute in which the Queensland government of Premier Campbell Newman favoured billionaire Gina Rinehart and her Indian partner GVK. Palmer won the seat of Fairfax and a Queensland Senate seat in Saturday’s election and could take a second Senate seat in Tasmania. This could give him a Senate veto over government bills.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://m.afr.com/p/national/meet_clive_palmer_tony_abbott_new_iM7oThrD0bm5WygpJNHKuM *** 30. Coalition's calm as it takes power is a calculated move [i]by:[/i] Katharine Murphy [i]Abbott, by keeping his arrival as prime minister elect low key, is in part deferring to a collective exhaustion stemming from the longest election season that I've witnessed in my years of reporting from Canberra. We are recovering now from a brutal epic which opened in June 2010 with the coup against Kevin Rudd, rolled on into the "real Julia" election of 2010, and then on through the 43rd parliament (which Abbott contested ferociously at every step until his final, decisive, "positive" flip into the 2013 election). Years of permanent campaign, no respite, tends to promote weariness. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/12/tony-abbott-media-coalition *** [u]PERIODICALS[/u] 31. Treating people well in Abbott's Australia [i]by:[/i] Andrew Hamilton [i] When power passes from one political party to another we do well to reflect on the shape of the times. The way any party will deal with the challenges it faces is often shaped less by the distinctive attitudes of its leader or members than by those it shares with its opponents. These are likely to represent the prevailing winds in society. And if they are inhumane, they will not be countered by leader or politician bashing but only by persevering advocacy of a better way. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38169#.UjHtRVK19ZY *** 32. Turnbull's electronic voting pitch is on the right track [i]by:[/i] Edwina Byrne [i]But before you get excited, Turnbull's objective here is not to spare you the 20 minutes standing in line every three to four years when you are forced against your will to think about who runs your country. No, if anything he wants more voting! Turnbull's justification is that roughly six per cent of voters failed to correctly fill in their ballot papers on Saturday, and thus lost their voice in the election. Electronic voting would stop this senseless waste. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38182#.UjH2K1K19ZY *** [u]PETITIONS[/u] The Liberal Party of Australia: Reconsider your plan for a 'FTTN' NBN in favour of a superior 'FTTH' NBN [b]NOW OVER 200,000 SIGNATURES - Malcolm is not happy.[/b] See story at No 14 above. To Tony Abbott, Malcolm Turnbull, the Liberal Party of Australia, the Senate and whom it may concern, This petition is designed to highlight Australia’s desire for a superior ‘Fibre to the Home’ (FTTH) broadband solution, rather than the Coalition’s proposed ‘Fibre to the Node’ (FTTN) solution. www.change.org/.../the-liberal-party-of-australia-reconsider-your-plan-for-a-fttn-nbn-in-favour-of-a-superior-ftth-nbn [u]TWEETS[/u] David Donovan ‏@davrosz 3h There once was a stuntboy called Tony/Whose utterances were utterly phony/He um'd ah'd & em'd/His way to PM/Now I wish he'd f.off on a pony. Peter FitzSimons @Peter_Fitz Karma? Australia elects a PM who says "Climate Change is Crap" and 3 days later has the hottest Sept day since 4ever! 31C at 10.30! #auspol Pascal @Passouts @latingle recount ordered in Lilley QLD - Swan ahead by 1500 but postal and pref counted incorrectly [u]TODAY’S FRONT PAGES[/u] Australian Newspaper Front Pages www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm [u]NEWS HEADLINES [/u] http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

cornlegend

13/09/2013Regarding the NBN petition to TurnbullYou may like to read about the turkey who set up the petition, the Liberal voting fool “I also supported that petition and in response I got a message from Nick Paine asking me to Facebook or Twitter any contacts to also get them to sign. In the body of Nick’s message is the following; “This is how we win our NBN back. Through hundreds of thousands of Australians joining the campaign, ensuring that every Coalition MP hears the community support for a full fibre to the home NBN — and turning the tide that’s running against the NBN right now. I voted Liberal this time around, because I felt they would do a better job than Labor overall. I really want them to engage with people on this issue. It’s going to be a tough fight, but one we can win if all of us ensure the new government hear us.” When I read that, I sent an email that stated, in part; “I signed the petition but if you voted Liberal then you’re simply getting what you voted for, that is, amongst other things, a crap NBN option, but then you knew that when you chose you preferred candidate. In that context I think Turnbull’s response is appropriate. If I’m unable to get the Labor branded NBN then it will due to you and those who voted for an inferior product. Sorry Nick, but I’m not going to help unscramble your eggs.”

Michael

13/09/2013Abbott lied on the front steps of The Lodge yesterday. Before the entire TV news watching nation. Asked by Kevin Rudd if "the girls will live here", referring to his daughters, Abbott replied "yes", as they plan to live 'at home' until they are married. Abbott knows full well that nobody will be living at The Lodge over the next year at least, as the renovations and removal of asbestos building material in it is reckoned to take the next 12 months. "The girls" won't be living "here". So, if they are to live with mum and dad Abbott, that's most likely to be at Kirribilli House. Now, Abbott will be required in Canberra many weeks of the year, Ma Abbott with him much of that time as 'first lady'. Does that mean taxpayers will be footing the bill for two young women to live year round at the Prime Ministerial residence in Sydney, in the absence of the PM? I suspect 'yes'. After all, Abbott collects per diems on top of his salary on charity activities, his gouging of entitlements and extra expenses is well-recorded. It's in his DNA to put his hand deep into the public pocket. (Something he learned at the feet of John Howard, who continues to claim the most money of any living ex-PM.) Get used to the idea of Kirribilli House being more routinely a city pad for two unelected young women than for the PM. And to you paying for it. Sort of a post school bonus for the Abbott kids.

Michael

13/09/2013This one's already linked to in the exemplary list above, but if you slid past http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-12/graham-prime-minister-for-indigenous-affairs/4951900 do have a look. If all Australians had voted in the same way as the original Australians we'd be living in a very different Australia today. No surprise that Noel Pearson's locals see him as an 'emperor with no clothes'. That's qualification number one to be an Abbott 'brother'.

Ad astra reply

13/09/2013Good morning folks Talk Turkey is right.  Today is the fifth birthday of The Political Sword.  I'll have more to say about that at the weekend. Casablanca Thank you for another great set of links this morning.  I've already looked at several; as usual they are varied in their coverage, and informative in their content. Today is a pivotal day for Labor as nominations for leadership are called.  I do hope Albo nominates - he is a true-blue Labor man.. for me the ideal combination would be Albo and Tanya.

TalkTurkey

13/09/2013[b]5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5[/b] [b]HAPPY 5th Birthday TPS! CONGRATULATIONS *AD*ASTRA*[/b] "WEBMASTER OF THE ERA" And to Lynnie our Tweety Bird and NormanK, Gypsy Janet, and Casablanca All of whom have relieved Lyn in her great work Not forgetting Acerbic Conehead !(Long time eh, best wishes) Pats on backs for ALL the MANY contributors who have helped TPS set the bar for open political blogsites ANYWHERE! Special Mention for JANICE! Ad's first correspondent on TPS and still with us! And PatriciaWA gotta get one too because Pomes. And from my own heart, Thank you to all who have ever directed any comment to me, or from whose wisdom I have benefited over the last 3~years~tomorrow! Well done all, [i]I love the smell of TPS in the morning![/I] (or any other time!) [i]It Smells Like[/i] [b]CIVILIZATION![/b] :)

TalkTurkey

13/09/2013Oh so it's Tony limericks is it? (Casa's Cache :) [b]@ 3.47 AM![/b] ) [i]I'll show them how to light a wrimerick![/i]* That sweet gentle Catholic, our Tony, Is certain he's God's One-and-Only But with Arsebigot Pell He is walking to Hell BAREFOOT - and the road's HOT! and STONY! *See Kay Kendall in [i]Genevieve[/i], [i]"I'll show them how to tray the plumpet!"[/i] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_S4UIlFuWw

TalkTurkey

13/09/2013[u]To Those Who Voted Abborrrt In[/u] In common parlance, you're blond! You have been collectively conned! Well we warned you that Tony's A Liar and Phony Still you thought he'd wave his Magic Wand!

Catching up

13/09/2013Why would adult children want to move in with dad. Wonder if he asked them. Do not two attend university in the Sydney region. Does not the the third live with her boyfriend. I suspect the family home,. the kids do not want to move out of, is the one they now reside in. Why not, with mum and dad not about.

TalkTurkey

13/09/2013Tune, [i]Give my regards to Broadway[/i] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0vA3qF62so Say your Goodbyes to Broadband Forget about the NBN Tell all your neighbours down your local street That Box there's Fibre's End! Whisper of how you're yearning To pay the Government Five Grand Just so that you can get that high-speed Optic fibre on your land! Har har har too easy, natural parody hey. Wish it were not so though. Sing it again, pretty tune, dunno whether it'll help the way you feel though. Probly not. It'd be fun if it wasn't so tragic. Australia was on the bus, and now we've stepped off and decided to walk the stupid copper road. Let us now get out our self-flagellators, and the blocks of wood we use to hit our heads with. We need a good shriving. Or should that be swiving. Oh no we've already swiven ourselves!

Michael

13/09/2013If the Abbott kids are anything like Dad they'll dive into the public money trough like greased lightning. The Howards moved out of their family home, and the kids went with them, at least until marriage beckoned for their daughter and the Far Right in Washington for son. There is no sense of entitlement like a Conservative sense of entitlement. Abbott's entire approach to leadership of the Opposition, the ROLE of Opposition, displayed/proved this.

Ad astra reply

13/09/2013Talk Turkey Thank you for your decorative birthday greetings, and your words of tribute. Thank you too for your consistent loyalty and support of the TPS family, and your regular contributions. You are a solid rock for us all. We need soon to decide where TPS goes from here.

42 long

13/09/2013On the "Boats" issue the Indonesians have reiterated slightly more forcibly what they said pre election about not agreeing to the dobbing in, and interference by AFP etc and buying fishing boats, on Indonesian soil. Surprise, surprise What hope did THAT "four years in the making, PLAN" (Brainfart?) ever have of running? Boat arrivals will be kept secret. Just imagine the furore if Labor had tried that one on. Open government for ALL.What ROT!. Julie Bishop will fix that. ( Known for her level headedness Moral high ground stands, and diplomatic skills). We will be at loggerheads with our nearest and biggest neighbours almost immediately. BANARNABY Joyce and Abbott. Good grief!. The inmates are running the asylum. Morrison nowhere to be found to answer for FOOL scheme to promote Indonesian boatbuilding industry. Truss and Barnaby can fight it out. .After all the CO alition are not a party. They are believe it or not, a CO-alition. In WA they don't get along and after the wonderful result in INDI where standing under the Banner "Ditch the Witch" might have been (dare I say it?) somewhat prophetic. Windsor and the NP had a bit to do with that result so we will let that work it's way through the LieNP structure. Tony will have to keep his foot on a rather large number of aspirants who want portfolios also. Only one woman in the shadow cabinet at the moment. (master of the DEATH STARE). Bronwyn BISHOP probably the most removed by the chair from the parliament may become the chairperson. Does any one see some irony in that. We live in interesting times. How can I let everybody know I didn't vote for this catastrophe?

42 long

13/09/2013Anthony Albanese contesting Labor Leadership. Both he and shorten agree to work with each other in any event. Mine goes for Albanese for background experience, ( He's got an impressive personal CV) , toughness and I would anticipate he would be popular amongst the " Branches". he can handle the Media too. He's quick and no fool. Very capable of taking it to the Abbott.

Michael

13/09/201393 House of Reps seats to the Coalition, 53 to Labor. One can only hope the 'winners' trip over each other trying to get their snouts in the trough. Playing 'follow the leader' should see a whole lot of tripping over going on.

janice

13/09/2013Ad astra, I've always had a lot of respect for Albo and think he'd be the right leader for Labor at this time. He would, I think, appeal to voters as he comes across as a rough diamond. He tells it as it is and makes no attempt to deceive or pull the wool over unwary eyes. Having said that, I do have some reservations though with regard to his support for the termite Rudd who is still there ready and willing to be a "suppository" of wisdom. It has now come to light that Mike Kelly would have hung on to Eden Monaro had he not advertised his support for Rudd, and I think there are probably a number of MPs who were turfed out by the voters for the same reason. Rudd is a toxic piece of flotsam.

Patriciawa

13/09/2013Thanks for the mention, TT, but without your encouragement and with Lyn and Ad Astra to get me thinking and with Michael paying me the compliment of publication over at the Cafe I would never have got up with the POMES. All these familiar names like DMWeir, Nasking. Gravel, Ewe2, janice and many more spring to mind. Remember how we were [b]The Political Sword Cheer Squad![/b] We bloggers at The Political Sword Have been accused by disgruntled readers Of being a leftie cheer squad. That’s true! Here we are, relaxing! Its leaders! This is what we wear on a working day. Far left is Janice and right is Lyn, And then there’s me, Patricia WA. Alongside feisty Feral Skeleton. We’re all in red. That white A makes clear Ad Astra’s the big boss, pictured right. He calls the tune, tells us when to cheer, And moves on rabble rousers hoping for a fight. http://polliepomes.wordpress.com/2011/05/17/ad-astras-cheer-squad/

2353

13/09/2013Happy 5th Birthday Swordsters. May there be many more. Thanks also to our genial host AA - where would we be without you? While I am not an ALP member (that Groucho Marx quote about not wanting to be a member of a club that would accept me comes to mind), I would be voting for Albo if I was. The reason is that he has demonstrated that he can work with both Rudd and Gillard - both of whom I suspect knew who he actually supported. Shorten does have history when it comes to playing the power broker which is not the image the ALP needs at the moment. The membership vote (and extended timeframe) is a wonderful idea. If Albenese and Shorten do it correctly and for the benefit of the ALP rather than themselves (a frequent claim over the past few years), the process could be used to change the subject of the conversation about the ALP from the LNP talking points that Abbott successfully used to one of a rich history of social and economic policy development and implementation - with more to come. All we have to hope for is that they are really intent on breaking the perception of meanness and vindictiveness that has seemed to surround the ALP in recent years.

Casablanca

14/09/2013[u]CASABLANCA'S CACHE:[/u] 14 September, 2013 [u]FOURTH ESTATE[/u] 1. Zoe's law: I am pro-choice, but my daughter deserved to be recognised [i]by:[/i] Brodie Donegan [i]Many of you probably have heard of Zoe’s law, which is being discussed this week here in Australia. It was named after my daughter. Zoe did not survive when a driver under the influence of drugs left the road and hit me on Christmas day 2009. I was 32 weeks pregnant. It took three hours to extract me from the scene and transport me via helicopter to the hospital. My daughter had a heartbeat upon arrival. Two hours later, when they began to have trouble locating it, I was given an emergency caesarian. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/13/zoe-law-abortion-pro-choice *** 2. How Labor won the 'ethnic vote' in Western Sydney [i]by: [/i] Andrew Jakubowicz [i] However there is no single 'ethnic vote' and as migrants become more successful and socially mobile, they move towards the voting pattern of their economic class and away from the voting pattern of early immigrant workers. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-13/jacubowicz-politics-of-ethnicity/4954660 *** 3. Tony Abbott's woman problem migrates to his ministry [i]by: [/i] Jonathan Swan [i]At present, the only woman certain to join Mr Abbott's cabinet is Julie Bishop as foreign minister. Mr Abbott is understood to be considering several women for cabinet appointments, which he is expected to announce early next week. They include West Australian Senator Michaelia Cash, who is right-leaning, Victorian MP Kelly O'Dwyer and NSW senator Marise Payne.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/tony-abbotts-woman-problem-migrates-to-his-ministry-20130913-2tozi.html#ixzz2ekn41BgZ *** 4. Labor should keep a cool head on climate change [i]by: [/i] John Connor [i]As the ALP considers its support for the Clean Energy Future legislation, it needs to consider credibility, community concerns, consistency with decades of Labor climate action traditions, and the impact on our and others climate diplomacy. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-13/connor-labor-should-keep-a-cool-head-on-climate-change/4956440 *** 5. The story of how Cathy McGowan stormed Indi [i]by: [/i]Barrie Cassidy [i]What set Indi apart from other successful runs by independents is that it was driven by the grass roots, and not by the candidate. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-13/cassidy-indi/4955258 *** 6. The legitimacy of 'mandate' [i]by: [/i] J.R. Nethercote [i]Few observers of Australian national politics will be surprised that, with a change of government, questions about "mandate" asserted themselves almost immediately. In the past six decades, "mandate" has been an important rhetorical device employed against or by a range of governments, notably those of Chifley, Menzies, Whitlam and Howard. "Mandate" has particular and active pertinence in Australia. Since adoption of the present method of electing the Senate, it has provided a rhetorical framework for inter-house battles that are at their most intense when a new ministry takes office. In this period, only one such ministry has had a majority in the Senate - that of Malcolm Fraser in 1975. Otherwise, new governments have invariably had a bicameral fight on their hands; when it is said that their vanquished opponents live to fight another day, the instrument as well as the forum for continuing battle is the Senate. [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/the-legitimacy-of-mandate-20130912-2tncq.html#ixzz2ekzVikgT [/i] *** 7. Ciao Bella: Sophie prepares to exit stage right [i]by: [/i] Damien Murphy [i]The unseating of a politician can be an occasion of sadness, even poignancy. Little such sweet sorrow awaits Sophie Mirabella's possible exit stage right. The gentlemanly independent MP Tony Windsor probably spoke for many when he let chivalry slip slightly and nominated Mirabella as the person he would miss least in politics. Brilliant academically, Mirabella studied law at Melbourne University, got into student politics, was a noisy Liberal Club president and caught the eye of Colin Howard, a dean of law and noted constitutional law expert. British-born Howard combined sneering superiority with social awkwardness and possessed a cruel appreciation for weak argument and weaker people. Mirabella learnt at his knee and then some.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/ciao-bella-sophie-prepares-to-exit-stage-right-20130912-2tnkj.html#ixzz2el0AmkUT *** 8. Abbott is a new man, but the left can't see it [i]by: [/i]Mark Kenny [i]But Abbott's insistence on taking it slow and steady has as much to do with presenting an antidote to his own reputation as it does Labor's. For Abbott to be successful, he needs to turn around a persistent view of him as a jaw-jutting political bovver boy - a divisive, ideological green beret, gifted at destroying things but with no aptitude for nation-building, for governing. Abbott in week one of his 2013 government is actually running against himself - or at least that version of himself. The slowness of his start is almost jarring. Not one post-election press conference and no cabinet named or sworn in. So much for all the emergencies on the borders, in the budget, in the economy. He even wants politics off the front pages in favour of sport.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/abbott-is-a-new-man-but-the-left-cant-see-it-20130911-2tkl3.html#ixzz2el1tRqta *** 9. 'Preference whisperer' defends role in minor parties’ Senate success [i]by: [/i] Bridie Jabour [i]Glenn Druery, the political consultant known as the “preference whisperer”, has been given the credit – or the blame – for the parties’ success, for his role advising minor parties to make a series of preference deals. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/13/preference-whisperer-defends-minor-party-success *** 10. Rupert Murdoch to give 2013 Lowy lecture in Sydney [i] by: [/i] Helen Davidson [i]Rupert Murdoch will return to Sydney to deliver the 10th anniversary Lowy lecture in October, the international policy thinktank announced on Friday. The Australian-born media mogul will deliver the lecture at the town hall at the Lowy’s annual black tie event, which invites prominent individuals to reflect on the two-way influence between Australia and the rest of the world. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/media/2013/sep/13/rupert-murdoch-lowy-lecture *** 11. No hard feelings, Kevin Rudd tells his colleagues [i]by: [/i]Jonathan Swan [i].... Mr Rudd said he wished nothing but ''collective success'' for everyone in the Labor Party. This presumably included former Trade Minister Craig Emerson, who accused Mr Rudd of ''treachery''; former MP Steve Gibbons who called Mr Rudd a ''psychopath'' and a list too long to mention of those who claimed the former prime minister was such an extreme micromanager he paralysed an entire government. In vacating the Labor leadership, which will be contested between Anthony Albanese and Bill Shorten, Mr Rudd told his colleagues they had ''preserved the party as a viable fighting force for the future''.[/i] [i]Read more:[/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/no-hard-feelings-kevin-rudd-tells-his-colleagues-20130913-2tpva.html#ixzz2em5jEWpS *** 12. Labor turns to its rank and file [i]by: [/i] Mark Kenny [i]Anthony Albanese is hoping to ride a wave of popular support among Labor's 30,000 rank and file members to claim the party's leadership as it conducts an historic open ballot. His formal tilt at the ALP's top job came at Labor's first caucus meeting since its election defeat last weekend, triggering a face-off against the right faction's rising star, Bill Shorten, 46. The 50-year-old political ''street-fighter'' known as ''Albo'' declared he was the best person to lead his shattered parliamentary party and that he can win the next election.[/i] [i]Read more:[/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/labor-turns-to-its-rank-and-file-20130913-2tq8t.html#ixzz2emL2YjQH *** 13. Tony Abbott tells Coalition MPs to savour win 'briefly' with challenges ahead [i]by: [/i] Judith Ireland [i]Prime Minister elect Tony Abbott has addressed Coalition MPs in Canberra for the first time since winning the federal election, telling colleagues to only ''briefly'' savour the moment before getting to work. To hearty applause, Mr Abbott told a joint party room meeting on Friday morning: ''My friends it is my honour to welcome you back to Canberra as the Prime Minister elect of Australia.'' [/i] [i]Read more: [/i]http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/tony-abbott-tells-coalition-mps-to-savour-win-briefly-with-challenges-ahead-20130913-2toud.html#ixzz2emLr6sDx *** 14. Anthony Albanese to run for Labor leadership against Bill Shorten [i]by: [/i] Simon Cullen [i] "I'm standing for the Labor leadership because I firmly believe that I'm the best candidate to lead Labor back into government at the next election," the former deputy prime minister told reporters after the meeting. "I'm standing because I have the policy credentials developed over a long period of time. "I'm standing because, as a senior minister in the government for six years, I looked after infrastructure, transport, regional development, local government, broadband, communications and the digital economy. "I did a good sound job in implementation of all of our policies in those areas. I think I'm up to a hard job. "My record shows that I have an ability to work with people - both across the Labor Party, but also across the parliament, in the community, and with the business sector."[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-13/anthony-albanese-to-run-for-labor-leadership/4956100 *** 15. Mike Kelly concedes defeat in Eden-Monaro [i]by:[/i] ABC [i]Labor's Mike Kelly has conceded defeat in his New South Wales seat of Eden-Monaro. Dr Kelly is trailing Liberal Party candidate Peter Hendy by just over 600 votes. Dr Kelly has used Twitter to announce he will be conceding this morning, telling his followers "it's over" and thanking them for their support. The outgoing minister for defence materiel has held the seat since 2007, after Kevin Rudd convinced him to contest the seat on the promise he would one day be defence minister in Mr Rudd's cabinet.[/i] [i] Read more:[/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-13/mike-kelly-concedes-defeat-in-eden-monaro/4955394 *** 16. Seselja confident of seeing off the Greens [i]by: [/i] Ross Peake [i]Liberal Zed Seselja is now speaking more confidently of victory in the ACT Senate race, after being welcomed into Friday's meeting of Coalition MPs. ''It does seem almost mathematically impossible for the Greens to get this seat,'' he said. ''I've had some feedback from the count today in terms of the postal votes and they appear to be running in our direction, which is what I would have anticipated. Short of a dramatic turnaround in the last 15,000 votes or so … it's a pretty large gap for the Greens.'' The Australian Electoral Commission is counting below-the-line votes which Greens candidate Simon Sheikh hopes will favour him. With 79 per cent of the vote counted on Friday, Mr Seselja has 33.57 per cent of the primary vote, while Labor's Kate Lundy has 34.83 and Mr Sheikh has 18.8 per cent.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/seselja-confident-of-seeing-off-the-greens-20130913-2tqoz.html#ixzz2emYdDSem *** 17. Left need not abandon all hope [i]by: [/i] Richard Denniss [i] A common response from progressive Australians to electoral defeat is to threaten to move to New Zealand. Just what moving to a country with a weaker economy, worse weather and a conservative government is supposed to achieve is typically left unsaid. But political strategy is not really the hallmark of the modern progressive, many of whom seem far more concerned with media strategy than Machiavelli. Tony Abbott's Coalition achieved a strong majority in the lower house on the back of some simple slogans that are largely anathema to many progressives, particularly his promises to ''stop the boats'' and ''scrap the carbon tax''. There is no doubt that if he sticks to his word there will be plenty for progressives to complain about in the next few years.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/left-need-not-abandon-all-hope-20130913-2tqoq.html#ixzz2emZjG9At *** 18. Abbott's model to wreck a government may come back to bite him [i]by: [/i] Peter Hartcher [i]Tony Abbott is promising again and again that he will lead a "methodical, measured, calm" government. But he's overlooking something. He's just finished writing a rip-roaring new guidebook on how to be a successful opposition. It's the Abbott model of how to destroy a government. And guess what? The Labor party noticed. Rule No. 1: Don't give the government a thing. Fight it up hill, down dale, day in day out. Be strident, be angry, be unreasonable. Apply maximum pressure and see what cracks.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i]http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/abbotts-model-to-wreck-a-government-may-come-back-to-bite-him-20130913-2tqa7.html#ixzz2emaMZjgk *** 19. Candidates wait as Labor steps into the unknown [i]by: [/i]Michael Gordon [i]A chastened Labor Party has taken the first bold step towards an uncertain future, embracing a process that could throw up a very awkward result. The risk is that the next leader of the party is not the preferred candidate of the MPs he will lead, so it becomes a recipe for instability. The risk is greater because, as things stand, the MPs will vote without knowing the result of the ballot of about 30,000 party members that will have been completed before they make their choice between Bill Shorten and Anthony Albanese.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i]http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/candidates-wait-as-labor-steps-into-the-unknown-20130913-2tq9l.html#ixzz2emdM0fsf *** 20. Time for Coalition to walk the pro-super talk [i]by: [/i] Richard Livingston [i]Tony Abbott said the Coalition wouldn't make any "negative unexpected changes" to superannuation. Now they're in government we'll get the chance to see what he meant. It was a long-winded way of making a simple commitment, which often means it won't end up meaning what we think. When Julia Gillard said her government would "never tax the superannuation payments of the over 60s" she meant they would tax their super at the source (in the fund) instead, by introducing a tax on income in excess of $100,000 per annum.[/i] [i]Read more:[/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/money/super-and-funds/time-for-coalition-to-walk-the-prosuper-talk-20130913-2tou1.html#ixzz2embE1uxz *** 21. Shorten's goal poses conflict of interest for Bryce [i]by: [/i]Nicholas Stuart [i]Just to make it absolutely clear, Quentin Bryce should resign immediately. This is not a comment on her personal appropriateness, or otherwise, for her position. The crucial point is that being Governor-General is not just a day job. It's a 24-hour role as the country's head of state. It is not Bryce's fault that she has a daughter, Chloe. And it is not her fault that Chloe fell for a young, ambitious politician, Bill Shorten. And it is not his fault that he is crawling his way to the top of the Australian Labor Party over the bodies of other people who he first installed, then trashed on his own path to the top.[/i] [i]Read more:[/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/shortens-goal-poses-conflict-of-interest-for-bryce-20130913-2tqos.html#ixzz2emcAIN4m *** 22. Finger-pointing as Libs weigh how the west was lost [i]by: [/i] Heath Aston [i] A factional brawl has erupted over the Liberal Party's failure to win over western Sydney.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i]http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/fingerpointing-as-libs-weigh-how-the-west-was-lost-20130913-2tq8q.html#ixzz2emeCxMlO *** 23. Electing new chief throws up a mix of challenges [i]by: [/i] Daniel Hurst [i]Details of the new election system for the leadership of the parliamentary Labor Party remain sketchy, with acting Labor chief Chris Bowen urging patience as the party works out how to include grassroots members in the ballot. And the party's national secretary, George Wright, has even raised the prospect of nationally televised debates between the two candidates as the Labor Party comes to terms with the new system. The process of installing Labor's parliamentary leader was rushed through in the activity following Kevin Rudd's return to the prime ministership, as a supposed antidote to ''faceless'' powerbrokers knifing incumbent leaders. [/i] [i]Read more:[/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/electing-new-chief-throws-up-a-mix-of-challenges-20130913-2tq9m.html#ixzz2emfA1T6z *** 24. Get us a drink, love, we're going to need it [i]by:[/i] Mike Carlton [i] Sonic waves from Queen's We Will Rock You are splitting the very air apart when I find the new senator at his country home somewhere to the north-west of Narrabri. After some prompting, Senator-elect Jayson Dropkic, the sole representative of the hitherto little-known We Like Lots Of Loud Noise And Hooning Down The Main Street Chucking Doughnuts On Saturday Night Party emerges and switches off the racket. A beefy man in his late thirties, give or take, his bare upper body is an impressive gallery of tatts; his hair, thinning in front, finishes at the back in the sort of mullet unseen east of the Blue Mountains since about 1980. Puzzled by my appearance, he nonetheless extends an oily paw for a handshake and introductions. "And now you're off to Canberra," I say. "Eh?" "The Senate. In Canberra." "Nah mate. I'm a NSW senator. It's that joint in Sydney in Macquarie Street, innit?" After a lot more explanation over a good many more Double Blacks, I take my leave. The senator assures me he will do his best for people and state, supporting the Abbott government when he believes its policies to be in the national interest.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.smh.com.au/comment/get-us-a-drink-love-were-going-to-need-it-20130913-2tq0o.html#ixzz2emiw3UBt *** [u]FIFTH ESTATE[/u] 25. AusOpinion goes inside the Greens Federal Election campaign [i]by: [/i] bluntshovels [i]The Greens have been roundly criticised for the fall in their national vote at the recent election. Despite this, they have increased their numbers in the Senate and retained their single lower house seat of Melbourne. Was this in line with their campaign strategy? And what will this mean for the Greens in the future? [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://ausopinion.com/2013/09/13/ausopinion-goes-inside-the-greens-federal-election-campaign/ *** 26. Walking on the wild side of Senate history [i]by: [/i]Tony Wright [i]As Australians digest a menu of new senators who appear as disparate as the crowd on a Saturday night at the Birdsville races, some of the patrons armed, it's worth remembering that the Senate has long produced wild surprises. He once blamed divorce for contributing to climate change. It seemed curious - he was a climate-change sceptic. But there it was: family break-up, he maintained, meant people going their separate ways, using more resources and increasing their carbon footprint. ''Mitigating the impacts of resource-inefficient lifestyles such as divorce helps to achieve global environmental sustainability and saves money,'' he burbled.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/walking-on-the-wild-side-of-senate-history-20130913-2tqaa.html#ixzz2emoMOCfo *** 27. Electing a Senate [i]by: [/i] mrtiedt [i]So there’s been a lot of talk about the Senate recently. i think its fair to say that many people have some pretty strong feelings about the rag-tag bunch of randoms that will be wielding a massive amount of power in our Upper House come 1 July 2014. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://ausopinion.com/2013/09/13/electing-a-senate/ *** 28. What’s in a mandate? [i]by: [/i] Drag0nista [i]What is a mandate exactly? It’s an authorisation to implement policy commitments deemed to have been given by the voters to the party that wins an election. The stronger the perceived win, the stronger the mandate claimed by the victorious party. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://ausopinion.com/2013/09/11/whats-in-a-mandate/ *** 29. As good as it gets [i]by: [/i]Andrew Elder [i]Australia needs to be an open society, tolerant of personal differences among people and communities, and innovative in terms of the business practices of government and the economy more broadly. The question before the last election was, can Tony Abbott deliver a government that meets the needs of the country? [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://andrewelder.blogspot.com.au/ *** 30. Factional Labourism: An Infantile Disorder [i]by: [/i] Mark Bahnisch [i]I don’t know about others, but a lot of Labor folk I know felt surprisingly good on Saturday night, and for a little while after the election dust had settled. It was refreshing to see Labor members finally appearing to “get it” – correctly attributing the party’s performance to disunity, division and constant infighting magnified through the media. On Q&A on Monday night, Tanya Plibersek gave the ALP governments 9/10 for policy and 0/10 for politics. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://larvatusprodeo.net/archives/2013/09/factional-labourism-an-infantile-disorder/ *** 31. Rundle mythbusts Abbott’s victory [i]by: [/i] Guy Rundle [i]“Labor’s lowest primary vote for a century!” Well, yes, but no. The point is that every Labor primary vote is going to be low from now on. The knowledge/culture/policy producer class has broken away and is voting for the Greens. Barring truly weird events, Labor ain’t coming back. That’s minimum of 7% — and as much as 12% — down from the mid-40s votes the ALP hitherto enjoyed. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.crikey.com.au/2013/09/10/rundle-mythbusts-abbotts-victory/ *** 32. Remember [i]by: [/i] Anna Winter [i]This is perhaps the first time a piece of Liberal negative political advertising actually worked on me. I had an immediate visceral reaction to it, a surge of anger at Rudd. But then also anger at Labor, at Abbott, at the whole situation that brought us here. It’s a Rorschach test on a corflute. A fascinating piece of campaign material, and every day I say good morning to Juliar as I walk past the one I have hanging proudly on my wall at home.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://larvatusprodeo.net/archives/2013/09/remember/ *** 33. A Labor Leader Departs: Kevin Rudd’s Address To The ALP Parliamentary Caucus [i]by: [/i]Kevin Rudd [i]Outgoing Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has addressed the ALP Caucus at its first meeting in Canberra since the Labor government’s defeat in the federal election last Saturday. Rudd told the Caucus that “together we have preserved the Party as a viable fighting force for the future”. He praised various members of the outgoing Cabinet and said: “I understand a number of folks in recent days have been free ranging in their character analysis of me. I have not responded because I do not believe this is in the best interests of our Party and our future. And to those who have made these criticisms, I bear none of you any malice and instead hope for your and our collective success in the future.” [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://australianpolitics.com/2013/09/13/kevin-rudd-address-to-the-labor-caucus.html *** 34. TAKE THAT, DEMOCRRACY [i]by: [/i] Corinne Grant [i] Kevin Rudd’s victory speech…sorry, concession speech…went for a full twenty minutes. Grinning like a Cheshire cat and tolerating some idiot in the audience whose constant screaming sounded like the world’s most annoying kettle, K Rudd went on and on and on about what a wonderful result he’d managed to achieve. He didn’t lose as many seats as Julia would have! Kevin’s excruciatingly long ‘suck on that, Julia’ soliloquy left me wondering whether someone had replaced the fluoride in Queensland’s water with LSD. Seriously, if the party honestly thinks it had anything to celebrate Saturday night, it’s just as well they’re not running the country.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://thehoopla.com.au/that-democracy/ *** 35. Behind Every Good Man Is ........ [i]by: [/i] Tracey Spicer [i]They stand decoratively by their “great man”, smiling yet silent. On the odd occasion they’re allowed to speak, every word is scripted. Wouldn’t want the little lady having a mind of her own, would we? She’s an appendage, an accoutrement: an asset. Jessica Rudd and the Abbott sisters are articulate, likeable, sassy women. Frances and Bridget looked mortified when their Dad told Big Brother housemates, “If you want to know who to vote for, I’m the guy with the not bad looking daughters”. To see them reduced to this is a sad indictment on modern society. Former British PM Harold MacMillan spoke about this syndrome early last century. He said, “No man succeeds without a good woman behind him.” Yet here we are, in the ‘new world’ in 2013, choosing between be-suited men, flanked by good women. .[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://thehoopla.com.au/good-man-is/ *** 36. Personal grief and Women's Rights [i]by: [/i]The Hoopla [i]There is no birth certificate as the baby is not regarded as a person, but there is a burial at the baby lawn of a crematorium. “I could not get a birth certificate, and it added to the struggle,” she says 18 years later. Naturally, that child will always be a person to that mother. He is still her first-born son. His name is Jack. In South Australia right now, a battle is on for women whose babies are stillborn [i]before[/i] 20 weeks to be granted a birth certificate. Grieving mother Tarlia Bartsch told ABC radio earlier this week that she is fighting for recognition of her baby boy Jayden, stillborn at 19 weeks. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://thehoopla.com.au/personal-grief-womens-rights/ *** 37. I'm a Material Girl [i]by: [/i] Wendy Harmer [i]Money is intrinsic to our successes and failures. Our love lives. Our hopes and aspirations for our families. Money makes us happy, or not. It gives us choices. It enables us to buy the image we’d like to present to the world. And perhaps that’s why discussing money is a taboo among women. If we can’t even admit to going grey… how do we confess the rest?[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://thehoopla.com.au/material-girl/ *** 38. Kevin: Time to Zip? [i]by: [/i]Monica Attard [i]Tony Burke doesn’t want the job. Neither does Chris Bowen. Tanya Plibersek has a three year-old (an apparent impediment according to Bob Hawke) and Anthony Albanese, better known as ‘Albo’ is mulling it over. That leaves Bill Shorten (whose three year old is apparently not an impediment) as the man most likely to lead Labor during the wilderness years which lie ahead: the wilderness from which there may be no exit unless the ALP can get over the recent past – and soon. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://thehoopla.com.au/kevin-time-zip/ *** 39. Bill Shorten Says ALP Leadership Contest Should Be Civil And Focus On Big Ideas [i]by: [/i] Malcolm Farnsworth [i]Speaking after today’s ALP Caucus meeting, Shorten said the task of the labour movement is to bring the party together and bring more people into the party. “I’m a campaigner and I’m a builder,” Shorten said. He cited his role in building the disability insurance scheme as evidence of his commitment to big ideas. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://australianpolitics.com/ *** [u]PETITIONS[/u] 40. It's the NBN, stupid! [i]by: [/i] The Hoopla [i]Let the mainstream media obsess about the carbon tax. A large proportion of Australians, it appears, are more concerned about what will happen with an entirely different Labor reform: the NBN. In the three days following the announcement of a new government, a petition on Change.org urging the new government to scrap its planned changes to the national broadband network had more than 188,000 signatures at the time of publishing. By Wednesday it had become Australia’s most popular online petition, garnering a new signature every 3.5 seconds.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://thehoopla.com.au/nbn-stupid/ *** [u]TWEETS[/u] Anthony Albanese ‏@AlboMP 2h A great honour to be a candidate in the 1st ever members ballot for ALP Leader with @billshortenmp # Jeanette Anderson ‏@Nettythe1st 35m #NX Anthony Albanese will make the better leader to move the ALP back to the left where it belongs. Mike Carlton ‏@MikeCarlton01 8h Ho hum. Richardson pretends he's still the soul of the ALP. He's actually the toad who brought you Eddie Obeid and now a Murdoch hireling. [u]EMAIL[/u] From ALP National Secretary: Today starts the process of electing our new leader, and for the first time our members will get a say. Here’s how it will work: • Nominations from Federal Labor members of caucus are open until next Friday - Bill Shorten and Anthony Albanese have already nominated; • Eligible Labor members will have two weeks to cast their vote; • That vote will be tallied and combined 50-50 with the result of a caucus vote This is an exciting time for Labor. Over the next month we’ll hear about the ideas and plans our leadership contenders have for this country’s future, and members will get to have a real say in what direction our great Party takes. Eligible members will receive a postal vote after nominations close. If you’re not a member and want to have a say on Labor’s future leaders in the years to come, you can join up here: http://www.alp.org.au/joinlabor?utm_source=australianlaborparty&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=leadershipvote&recruiter_id=48604 George Wright National Secretary [u]TODAY’S FRONT PAGES[/u] Australian Newspaper Front Pages www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm [u]NEWS HEADLINES [/u] http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

TalkTurkey

14/09/2013Casablanca I often steal a really pretty rose, or some other flower, from some odd place and present it to whichever (female!) person may be with me at the time. It is delightful if that person actually picks up on its prettiness: admires it for a few seconds/ sniffs it appreciatively/ hugs it/ puts it in water asap/ emplaces it prettily. Any of that is a far greater compliment back to me than my original compliment in presenting a flower which cost me nothing. Thank you for putting your *Caches* in water. It's sort of like a cutting from @lynlinking's garden, I'm so glad you like it. It sounds nice, I always love alliterative names. And it is a cutting with infinite growth potential. I've just been through today's Cache - (btw is that [i]Kaish[/i] or [i]Kashay?[/i] I don't even know, I think it's either!)-Dog Alrighty what a [i]catch![/i] All good stuff too. Wow. Just one thing Casablanca, you know your limits best I guess, but do pace yourself, this is one helluva lot of work you're putting in here, don't burn out. Respect.

Pappinbarra Fox

14/09/2013Wow it is week of reading, thank you so much. Ad, I believe the TPS must continue. May I make a suggestion that would lift the burden off you a little? Invite fencers to contribute essays, perhaps on topics suggested by you, as the weekly launch pad for discussion. The essays should be analytical and creative but not scurrilous. You would keep editorial control. Perhaps occasionally there might be dueling essays. Perhaps fencers could be invited to submit essays on a topic of their own choice so there would be a pool of essays for you to choose from. You have probably already considered this idea but I think it could work well to ease your workload and to keep fresh perspectives rising in the fencing community.

Ad astra

14/09/2013Folks We have a big birthday party to organize today, so I won't be around until this evening, when I'll catch up with the links. Thanks for the suggestion PF. I'll canvass ideas for [i]TPS[/i] tomorrow.

Michael

14/09/2013Stirring hatred, disgust, misogyny. Embodying spite, wilfulness, hypocrisy. Fostering lies, evasion, dismissiveness. Allowing exaggeration, false characterisation, maligned family connections. Some examples but not all of the nature of the Abbott Opposition and Abbott himself at its helm. Lauded by Peter Hartcher here http://www.smh.com.au/national/abbotts-model-to-wreck-a-government-may-come-back-to-bite-him-20130913-2tqa7.html?skin=text-only as the method for whomever leads the Labor party after the ballot to bring Labor back to power. To become doppelgangbangers of Abbott's mob. At what cost to the nation, at what cost to Australians, at what cost to those Abbott's Federal government will engage with at every level from UN diplomacy to street-level informing local police that refugees have moved into the neighbourhood? I know this question answers itself, but what can Peter Hartcher actually be thinking as a human being if he endorses and recommends Abbott's bottom of the moral barrel approach to Opposition as the best way to win government, indeed the only one likely to succeed? Should Labor emulate foulness in order to win? Apart from anything else, it is the failures and still-riperotting flaws in Abbott's personality that shaped how he 'led' the Opposition. For Labor to mirror the last Opposition's method, its leader would have to slip on the cloak of Abbott's manner, and that, I suggest, would be too foul a costume for anyone to willingly wear.

TalkTurkey

14/09/2013 *J*U*L*I*A* SPEAKS! http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/13/julia-gillard-labor-purpose-future

BSA Bob

14/09/2013Michael @ 8.58 I wouldn't worry too much about Labor replicating Abbott's tactics. The media wouldn't let them get away with it.

42 long

14/09/2013When you don't work "hand in glove" with the media your options are limited. No reasonable media would, have let abbott move over 80 suspensions of standing orders in Question Time. A clearly planned trick to get free advertising of outrageous "unable to be responded to" ALLEGATIONS. on ABC TV.

Bacchus

14/09/2013Women of character! http://www.theherald.com.au/story/1775058/pms-letter-to-herald-journalist-joanne-mccarthy/?cs=303

Michael

14/09/2013BSA Bob. Sums up, as I'm sure you meant, the problem of the last 4 years. Any form of complicity is the enemy of true democracy. At any and every level of society, between any of its institutions or congregations. Complicity for advantage presupposes and facilitates disadvantage to others as an actively sought result. Do that to your 'neighbours', whatever you think you are, you ain't.

DMW

14/09/2013Bacchus thanks for that link Everyone [b]MUST [/b] read it. ... and have your tissues box handy

DMW

14/09/2013The Monthly ‏@THEMONTHLY 13 Sep By popular demand: we're keeping Christos Tsiolkas' Why Australia Hates Asylum Seekers unlocked for a little longer: http://goo.gl/mtlhaZ A long read and worth it, do it while you can Hint go there now and save it to a file for reading later maybe

Casablanca

14/09/2013[u]CASABLANCA'S CACHE:[/u] 15 September, 2013 This is a special edition of 'CASABLANCA'S CACHE' to mark the first substantial public comments that Julia Gillard has made since being deposed. Ms Gillard did tweet her congratulations on the night of the elections and as was the case throughout her time in office, there was a barrage of vicious and vile responses. Ms Gillard says that she choose to spend election night at home and alone. It must have been an ineffably heartrending experience for her, not least of all because Election Day 2013 was the eve of the first anniversary of her beloved father's death. I have included a couple of older articles at the end of the list which offer some further insights into the nature of the campaign against Ms Gillard. I will collate more responses in the next edition of 'CC'. [u]J*U*L*I*A GILLARD[/u] 1. Julia Gillard writes on power, purpose and Labor’s future [i]by: [/i]Julia Gillard [b]Exclusive: Australia's former prime minister breaks her silence, writing exclusively for Guardian Australia on her legacy, her hopes for a new Labor leader… and the pain of losing power[/b] [i] During the election campaign, an elderly lady in Melbourne’s west grips my arm with surprising force. Next day I have light bruises to remind me of the moment. She looks at me with anxiety in her eyes and says that while she reads and watches all the news she just can’t understand what the election campaign is about. She wants to know, is this her fault or the fault of the campaign? After a resounding Labor loss, that word “fault” is now everywhere. Exhaustion and emotion have been on sad display in the last few days. But though it is so painful and so hard, now is a time for cool analysis. It is a time to carefully plan Labor’s future and its next contribution to the nation.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/13/julia-gillard-labor-purpose-future *** 2. PM's letter to Herald journalist Joanne McCarthy [i]by: Ian Kirkwood and Joanne Mccarthy [/i] [i]‘Thanks in large measure to your persistence and courage, the NSW Special Commission of Inquiry and the federal Royal Commission will bring truth and healing to the victims of horrendous abuse and betrayal,’’ Ms Gillard wrote. Then I read the letter in full and didn’t know whether to laugh or cry, so I did a bit of both before putting it down and walking out into the dark with the dog. When I returned I read the letter again, and then I cried. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theherald.com.au/story/1775058/pms-letter-to-herald-journalist-joanne-mccarthy/?cs=303 *** 3. Gillard breaks silence on Rudd's resurrection [i]by: Caroline Zielinski [/i] [i]Kevin Rudd was only resurrected as prime minister because he could help Labor do better at the election, and not because his colleagues liked him or wanted him back, Julia Gillard has said. Ms Gillard has written an essay arguing "Labor unambiguously sent a very clear message that it cared about nothing other than the prospects of survival of its members of parliament at the polls". She writes that under Kevin Rudd, the party did not have "one truly original idea to substitute" the policies Ms Gillard introduced while in office. The only way forward for Labor is to mend its broken spirit and culture, which currently reward members for "leaking and destabilising" each other over articulating a clear purpose for the nation.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/gillard-breaks-silence-on-rudds-resurrection-20130914-2tr1s.html#ixzz2eq3oS8Cd *** 4. Julia Gillard: losing power 'hits you like a fist' - exclusive [i]by: [/i] Lenore Taylor [i] Former prime minister reveals grief, pain and regret over losing power, and issues fierce defence of her time in office in article for Guardian Australia In an exclusive 5000-word article written for Guardian Australia, the former Labor prime minister of Australia says that “losing power is felt physically, emotionally, in waves of sensation” and that the pain “hits you like a fist, pain so strong you feel it in your guts, your nerve endings.” Gillard also says that Labor lost the election because Kevin Rudd returned without “one truly original new idea” and because he was unable to explain her enduring policy achievements. She believes that the party could muster no reason for his comeback other than that its polling might improve.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/13/julia-gillard-losing-power-fist?CMP=ema_632&et_cid=49019&et_rid=7108914&Linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.theguardian.com%2fworld%2f2013%2fsep%2f13%2fjulia-gillard-losing-power-fist *** 5. Julia Gillard: where did it all go wrong? [i]by: [/i]Katherine Murphy [i] As the great Irish existentialist Samuel Beckett once wrote, the end is in the beginning, and yet you go on. That was Julia Gillard’s story, and Labor’s story since June 2010. Gillard unseated a prime minister who had not yet served out his first term in office. Voters didn’t expect it, and they didn’t care for it. Gillard became the face of a treacherous assassination culture imported from Sussex Street, Sydney, a symbol of Labor’s absent moral core. Killing Kevin was an act from which she never fully recovered. Perhaps she could have recovered if she had not compounded shock with aftershock – if she didn’t go on unsettling people. Gillard’s consistent failure to reassure is the common thread behind the series of events that have led her to this day, to this inexorable end.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jun/26/julia-gillard-where-go-wrong *** 6. 'Stop the selfies': Gillard calls for substance, purpose [i]by: [/i]Matt Cram [i] Julia Gillard has broken her public silence, penning an essay in which she discusses Labor's failings and prospects, as well as revealing her emotions as she watched Labor lose power alone. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.3aw.com.au/blogs/breaking-news-blog/stop-the-selfies-gillard-calls-for-substance-purpose/20130914-2tr3w.html *** 7. Julia Gillard breaks her silence [i]by: [/i] Josephine Tovey [i] During the seemingly endless oration from the ousted Labor prime minister Kevin Rudd, and the triumphant speech of election winner Tony Abbott, neither man spared a word for the woman who had led the country for three of the past six years. Former prime minister Julia Gillard was invisible in these moments. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/federal-election-2013/julia-gillard-breaks-her-silence-20130908-2tdfu.html#ixzz2eqVc9LwY *** 8. Julia Gillard slams Labor leadership reform as contest between Bill Shorten and Anthony Albanese begins [i]by: [/i] ABC Former prime minister Julia Gillard has hit out at a new rule about how the Labor Party can remove a leader, describing it as "a clumsy attempt" for bad leaders to hold onto power. Under reforms introduced by Kevin Rudd, the only way to remove the leader is for 60 per cent of Caucus members to sign a petition requesting a new election. [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-14/julia-gillard-slams-labors-leadership-rules/4957886 9. Julia Gillard breaks her silence on pain of losing power [i]by: [/i] Bonnie Malkin [i] Ms Gillard, who was born in Barry in south Wales, wrote that she was grieving for the loss of power, describing it as "a pain that hits you like a fist, pain so strong you feel it in your guts, your nerve endings". [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/australia/10309019/Julia-Gillard-breaks-her-silence-on-pain-of-losing-power.html *** 10. How do Labor's leadership voting rules work? [i]by: [/i]Simon Cullen [i] Under new caucus rules, formal nominations for leader of the parliamentary Labor Party open today and will remain open for a week. A ballot of the parliamentary Labor Party and the broader party membership will be held to determine the outcome. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-13/how-do-labor-leadership-voting-rules-work/4955726 *** 11. 10 of the most vicious fights in Australian politics [i]by: [/i] Van Badham and Karen Pickering . 27 June 2013 [i] Another day has passed in Australian politics, and, with it, the prime-ministerial career of Julia Gillard. To the outside world, the griping, carping, leaking and factional bloodbaths in the corridors of power may appear to herald a new era of dark malice on a continent famed for its sunshine. Foreigners: please be aware that your sudden awareness of our political fistfights is but a Twitter phenomenon. Perhaps it's because the weather's good for fighting, because our nasal vernacular affords a brutal-sounding rhetoric, or because the white systems of government are built on a foundation of Aboriginal genocide and yet broil with angry guilt – but be assured Australian politicians have been committing acts of high bastardry against one another for years. Here is our top 10.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jun/27/vicious-fights-australian-politics *** 12. Australia, let's talk about manners [i]by: [/i] Ben Pobjie Friday 14 June 2013 [i] Really, Australia? Is this the way it’s going to be? This is how we’re going to play it? The political discourse in this country, having been sputtering for some time, finally went into its unstoppable death spin this week, trailing a plume of black smoke and echoing with the screams of the terrified and slightly bored voters trapped inside. We started out with a surrealist moment when everyone suddenly started talking about blue ties for no readily apparent reason. We then were subjected to the affair of the menu, in which we learnt just what classy, sophisticated affairs Liberal Party fundraisers are.[/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jun/14/gillard-sattler-hairdresser-radio *** 13. PMs rarely begin and end with the people [i]by: [/i] Joff Lelliott. 23 Aug 2013 [i] Australians have always tended to let circumstance change the prime minister and then go on to endorse (and occasionally reject) the decision at the subsequent election. Just four prime ministers have both begun and ended prime ministerships courtesy of the public. That means 29 prime ministerial terms either started or finished without the public casting a vote. [/i] [i]Read more: [/i] http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-23/lelliott-prime-ministerial-legitimacy/4908354 ***