Julia Gillard’s Fireside Chat - Your Heath Mark 2

This is a second attempt to craft a set of messages about health that PM Gillard might transmit, modified in the light of your comments and suggestions, some of which have been included verbatim. An attempt has been made to generalize and personalize the ‘chat’ using ‘we’, ‘us’, and some personal anecdotes. Please note that these are fictitious and are simply included to illustrate the value of the personal approach. I have no knowledge of PM Gillard’s experiences in the health area, but she must have had many which would allow her to add a personal touch to what she says.

So this is Mark 2. Please feel free to make further suggestions about how it might be improved. It would be satisfying to at least get the message pretty right. Delivering it is another matter, which needs to be dealt with also, but in your comments it would make for more balanced discourse if you could comment on the content of the message and the process of delivery separately. In regard to the latter, there is the question of the most appropriate media for delivering the messages, and of course Julia Gillard’s style of delivery.

I suggest you read it just as it comes at you, rather than trying to pick the difference from the first version. I look forward to your further feedback. For me, this has been an informative exercise.

Your Health


Good Evening

Tonight I want to talk to you about your health and the health of your community.

All of us know how important good health is to us. It gives us feelings of wellbeing. It makes it possible for us achieve our ambitions.

We know too that a healthy community is a good place in which to live, and a healthy workforce makes for high productivity and prosperity.

Yet many of us are not well; not all have the best of health. This is why we need a good health care system.

It is up to governments, both federal and state, to give all of you the best opportunity to lead healthy, happy, productive lives by providing easily accessible and affordable health services near to where you live.

Yet I have spoken with mothers and fathers who have had great difficulty getting a doctor when they needed need one, and have endured long waits, often in overcrowded hospital emergency departments. One solution was to build GP Super Clinics [images of interior of Super Clinics with just a few patients] where communities requested them, so that these parents can get quick access to good care when they need it, especially after hours. Another solution was to train many more primary care doctors and nurses to overcome the shortage we now experience.

Because much of the illness in the community is preventable, great emphasis has been placed on primary care that is given by your family doctor, your GP, or a community nurse. Your GP [images of a female GP consulting with a mother and child] is trained to prevent illness through immunization and advocating a healthy lifestyle. GPs are also trained to detect illness in its early stages when it is most treatable, as well as treating established disease.

Lifestyle conditions afflict too many in this country. We can all see that obesity is widespread, even among children, [images of obese persons] and combined with physical inactivity and a poor diet too often leads to heart problems, diabetes, joint problems and some cancers.

Alcohol and substance abuse, [images of social effects of alcohol] along with smoking, have caused havoc. Binge drinking, especially among the young, has reached alarming proportions. Alcopops legislation has reduced the sale of these products, so attractive to adolescents yet so dangerous.

Smoking kills over 15,000 Australians each year and costs well over half a billion dollars in healthcare. In a further attempt to reduce smoking plain packaging for cigarettes with dire health warnings will soon be introduced [images of Nicola Roxon with plain packages and warnings]. The tobacco industry is fighting this tooth and nail because it believes it will reduce its profits, but I am determined to press ahead because we believe plain packaging will discourage young people from taking up this dangerous habit.

Mental illness is on the rise. Is there any one of us who has not been touched by it in our family or amongst our friends or workmates? It is affecting both old and young. Suicide is high and leaves tragedy in its wake. Last year 2000 people took their own lives; 300 were young people between 15 and 24.

The 2010 Australian of the Year, Professor Pat McGorry, [image of Pat McGorry with Julia Gillard] has strongly advocated for increased funding for mental health for the ‘headspace’ and other programs, so in this year’s budget several billion dollars was committed for this purpose over the next four years. Mental health must be a top priority.

As the population ages, the number of older people needing support is rising steadily [images of older people in their homes]. I see them as I travel around the country. As more and more baby boomers reach retiring age the demand for services for the elderly and places in retirement homes will rise steeply and place even greater pressure on this sector [images of nursing homes]. We must respond by providing more qualified staff, more carers, and more facilities to care for our older citizens. Carers are in special need of our support [images of carers caring for patients].

We know that the incidence of serious chronic illness, such as cancer, is rising. A few years ago my best friend was diagnosed with breast cancer. I saw at first hand the excellent quality of the medical care she received, but also came to understand that the personal support from family and friends, and the physical environment in which she received her care, were also vitally important to a good outcome. Because she was a country girl the stress on her young family was increased by the need to travel a long way to Adelaide for treatment, and too often be alone while doing so. She told me that it would have helped a great deal if a clinic had been available closer to home. [This anecdote is fictitious and used only as an example]. The cancer clinics that have been built in regional areas in the recent times, [several images of cancer clinics, perhaps with one being opened by the PM] like the one recently announced for Albury, are the result of that conversation, both of us in tears.

We have leading researchers in this field; now I want to support them properly for the next round of breakthroughs in cancer treatment. One day I hope no one will have a young friend dying from breast cancer like I did.

Many people living in rural and regional areas have told me that distance from large specialized centres has been a crippling burden. One of the benefits of the National Broadband Network [images of NBN installations, perhaps the opening of the Armidale one] is that it will reduce that remoteness by enabling consultations between rural patients and city specialists via super fast broadband [moving image of a remote consultation].

The NBN will enable monitoring of the chronically ill in their homes, which will reduce the pressure on hospitals and nursing homes [image of elderly person monitored at home], and e-health will enable your health records to be available to any health care provider that you consult, no matter where [image of health record on a computer].

And the increasing prevalence of disability in both old and young demands our attention, to them and their carers. I have seen the burden that carers carry; we must support them wherever they are. [images of disabled persons with carers]. The NBN will bring support closer to those in remote places.

It is a depressing fact of life that dementia is becoming more and more common. I see many with dementia on my visits to nursing homes, and the sadness that brings to them, their family and their carers. [more images of older persons with Julia Gillard]. We must provide for them and their carers.

With the aging of the population the cost of health care will continue its steady rise to the point where at mid century all of a state’s budget will be consumed by health care costs alone, leaving none for other essential services, unless different funding arrangements are made.

This is why the Federal Government has entered into an arrangement with the states to share healthcare costs, with 50% being funded by the Commonwealth [image of COAG meeting over the health care agreement].

Federal and state governments will contribute to a single national pool for hospital funding to be administered by an independent national funding body. Hospitals will be funded based on the activity they undertake. Independent local hospital networks [images of local hospitals, staff and patients] will be responsible for managing public hospital services and the funding to provide those services.

This will take some of the pressure off state health departments and will give greater responsibility to those actually delivering the care.

The new arrangements are designed to contain rising costs and reduce the far-too-long waiting times for elective surgery and the long periods in hospital emergency rooms that we all know ill patients endure while waiting for treatment or admission.

We are determined to remedy the problems with the hospital system we all know about by providing enough beds, sufficient well-trained staff and easy and rapid access.

The Government strongly supports Medicare, the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, Private Health Insurance, which we believe should be means tested, and medical research.

Healthcare, along with education, are at the top of the Government’s priorities. It has already devoted countless billions to health, and in the recent budget has allocated still more.

Compared with other countries we know that Australia has a fine health care system, but we also know that it can be improved in many areas.

We are determined to bring about these improvements and to complete the health reforms begun in the Government’s last term so that all Australians can have the high quality health care and support that all deserve, where they live and when they need it.

I ask that you join with me in achieving that aim. I need your help and support.

Thank you for your attention.

Postscript

Please note that the anecdotes in this piece are fictitious and are used simply as examples.

What do you think of Mark 2?

Rate This Post

Current rating: NaN / 5 | Rated 0 times

David Horton

30/05/2011Yes, well done, Ad, good work. Worth emphasising again, perhaps in the text itself, that [b]this is a purely imaginary anecdote[/b] in case it is picked up and quoted out of context.

NormanK

30/05/2011Ad astra Bravo! Especially for having the courage to undertake a rewrite. I hope you are still satisfied that it carries the message you wished to convey. The tone is much better. No little switches going off in my brain to warn me that this is a political speech. Excellent.

Ad astra reply

30/05/2011David Horton Thank you - I have added a reiteration of the fictitious nature of the anecdotes in the Postscript.

Feral Skeleton

30/05/2011macca, To go part way to answering you proposition, he's Tim and he's here to help Julia: http://www.smh.com.au/national/the-queen-and-i--were-like-that-20110527-1f8j1.html

janice

30/05/2011Ad astra, I agree with David H and NormanK. You have succeeded in writing a "talk" rather than a political-sell speech and for me at least, it is short and sweet in simple language that is easy to listen to.

Ad astra reply

30/05/2011David Horton, NormanK, Janice Thank you for your feedback. I am still open to feedback to improve it yet more. If the messages are nearing the mark, the next question is how should they be transmitted. Is the idea of the ‘fireside chat’ so old hat that it is unsuitable in 2011? If so, how should the messages be transmitted? How do the social media fit in?

TalkTurkey

30/05/2011Ad astra I haven't read much of "Your Heath :) Mark 2" But I'm across the general idea on TPS of 'Fireside Chats'. I think the notion of fireside chats has some kernel of good idea, but I think that the folksiness implied by the appellation is a bit suss-making. What are some of the options that would nuance the instant hit from hearing that *J*U*L*I*A* is about to have a sensible talk to the nation? Like: Julia Gillard to address nation. Julia Gillard to talk to Australia PM talks turkey to populace . . . and here I invite (challenge?)Swordsters to come up with a better one because the above are just notional. It needs to suggest exciting not boring, needs gravitas but not pomposity, needs earnestness but sparkles of humour. And the tenor and length of the substance of the talk should be just what the chosen term suggests. There should be no questions, the general tone should be optimistic but serious, not patronising or even close because we all know what the media would do with something like that. It should sound like quite an event, something worth watching, that all the media will hanker after being there with cameras; no tweeting during the talk, no interjecting, (or the tweeter/interjector never to be invited again) and press releases would be distributed with a caution, that should the substance be distorted, legal action may be taken. A clever little SURPRISE would be good - like an offer "on the budget coming back into surplus in 2013" to subsidise the retro-fitting of rainwater tanks, e.g., because EVERYBODY thinks saving water is a good idea, and the very presence of rainwater would help to encourage frugality. So what I'm saying is Yes I think she should use her office to address Australians seriously, but it all needs very careful thought.

Ad astra reply

30/05/2011Hi Lyn, janice I'm with you. I like Julia Gillard, ocker voice and all. We can all improve in presentation with sound advice from experts in communications. I have personally benefited from one such expert who videotaped my addresses and gave feedback that improved my delivery. But he did not try to change my voice or accent. His advice covered tempo, pauses, emphasis and particularly eye contact, which is so important to maintain even when reading from notes. So I doubt if we could expect much change in her voice or her way of speaking even with expert advice, and if she did change noticeably you can bet the media would be all over it, criticising her and asking - is this the real Julia or someone else? I think we need to accept her talking style and not get caught up in the critical process that the media enjoys so much in preference to addressing the message she is trying to transmit, which after all is what is important to us all. She is the PM and what she says is important even if we don’t agree with it all.

Ad astra reply

30/05/2011TT I agree that ‘fireside chat’ is probably a misnomer. ‘Julia Gillard talks to (or with) the nation’ or ‘Julia Gillard’s conversation with the nation’ are probably nearer the mark.

Ad astra reply

30/05/2011Folks I'm going now to watch [i]Four Corners, Media Watch, Q&A, Lateline[/i], as I expect you are too. I'll keep an eye on the blog via the iPad.

lyn

30/05/2011Hi Ad I think your approach and words are magnificent, if I was at the fireside chat and you were talking I would believe every word you said in "Fireside Chat - "Your health Mark 2". You sound like you are talking just to me. I just read athis blog and I like these words: [quote]I’m not saying change the leader but simply get the leader to change. if you think you’re a leader and you look around and no one is following you then you’re not a leader. I think Julia needs a crash course in leadership and one Maxwell law she really needs to work on is his Law of Connection. “[b]You must touch the heart before you ask people to follow[/b],” he says. “Communicate on the level of emotion first to make a personal connection.” Ms Gillard’s carbon tax policy left her people behind. It was never properly explained and rested on a lie and that’s why she had to talk to us to bring us along on this costly journey.[/quote] http://oxygen.com.au/?p=1160

Ad astra reply

30/05/2011Hi Lyn Thank you for your kind feedback. While there is truth in Switzer’s quote: [i]“You must touch the heart before you ask people to follow.”[/i] and [i]“Communicate on the level of emotion first to make a personal connection.”[/i], I don’t subscribe to his contention that she does not do this and therefore needs ‘a crash course in leadership’. Look at her visits to all sorts of places and we see someone who ‘connects’ easily and comfortably. Connecting to the Canberra Press Gallery crowd is like connecting to a cactus bush. If she doesn’t look connected there, you don’t have to look hard for the cause – they are all wielding microphones and posing silly questions to catch her out. Switzer’s statement about the carbon tax: “[i]It was never properly explained and rested on a lie and that’s why she had to talk to us to bring us along on this costly journey.[/i]” points to his orientation and calls into question the sincerity and validity of his advice.

janice

30/05/2011Ad astra, The name "Fireside chat" would have to be replaced with something that would grab the attention and invoke some curiosity in people to get them to want to tune in and listen/watch. The PM's "talk" could be presented from a cosy sitting room at the Lodge. Someone suggested that the LOTO will demand equal time, but I'm sure this could be overcome if necessary. The government would need to find the solution to this one as it is beyond me. :)

TalkTurkey

31/05/2011Ad astra said: "I don’t subscribe to [Switzer's] contention that (*J*U*L*I*A*) needs ‘a crash course in leadership’. Look at her visits to all sorts of places and we see someone who ‘connects’ easily and comfortably. Connecting to the Canberra Press Gallery crowd is like connecting to a cactus bush." Yeah well said Astrafix. Hooray to see some loyalty. If she were leading the Coalers imagine the sycophancy (sicko fancy!) of the yellow media. JG is tough, smart and determined. Poll results are satisfactory, almost. Govt tpp 48% (+2) Coalers 52% (-2). Still in the first quarter! (I'm calling rhe new Senate as the beginning of the 2nd.) Abbortt must sink now. Negative is the word that will be his epitaph. Oh boy today's been good. The last few days, indeed. atm Being good for Labor as I write. Now Oakeshott and Windsor, fine blokes on behalf of Australia, are on Lateline, and they are very shrewd, decent and determined too. They are quietly screwing the lid down on Abbortt's coffin with the talk of looking to the future rather than the next election. They love the NBN and they are staunch about climate change, and we are flying. Cate and Caton are pure gold, the more the Coalers throw poop at Cate the more she bounces it off back at them without even having to show her face. All decent people throw it back at them for her! :) I confidently predict that the next poll will be up again for Labor, and down again for Coalers, and a little down for the Greens too. And in 31 days we'll be kicking with the wind. I must say I am surprised by how wobbly people are. I have always thought Abbortt must crash and burn. Well crash anyway. He is doing it at an almost alarming rate now. I don't want him gone too early. But as someone pointed out somewhere today the Govt and Julia in particular will get a bounce and a lot more confidence when the legislation on CO2 ('carbon doxide' says Abbortt) is through and the sky hasn't fallen in. And any replacement LOTO will have to deal with an empowered PM. No pasaran! Venceremos!

TalkTurkey

31/05/2011ValErie She's going to buy each AIDS victim a new Bentley to make up. Or would you prefer a Learjet? Or both? One at least will be compulsory so Labor can waste more money. BTW what did you have in mind?

David Horton

31/05/2011You have spam (fourth above) getting through again Ad, need to check ho this is happening.

Glorfindel

31/05/2011You've completely missed the bit where she explains why dental health is no longer a priority. The best chat Julia could give the nation is the one where she says "I've slowly come to the realization that I've made a series of terrible blunders, starting with my decision to challenge for the leadership. I'm resigning, goodbye"

lyn

31/05/2011 [b]TODAY'S LINKS[/b] [i]Leading the Liberal Party, Andrew Elder, Politically Homeless[/i] Abbott is finished; those who say Abbott still has time or might rise to some new level of statesmanship are kidding themselves. http://andrewelder.blogspot.com/2011/05/leading-liberal-party-you-can-lead.html [i]The Liberals start to normalise - an update, The Piping Shrike[/i] Turnbull, as oblivious as ever. It was striking how well he demolished Coalition’s climate change policy the other night on Lateline. Not just by stating the obvious ludicrousness http://www.pipingshrike.com/2011/05/the-liberals-start-to-normalise-%e2%80%93-an-update.html [i]Shout It Out!, Neil Cook, The Bannerman[/i] The performance of Tony Abbott et al in the House today was equally disingenuous, preferring to focus on Cate Blanchett’s expression of opinion as “someone who lives six months of the year in Hollywood, http://www.waddayano.org/blog/2011/05/shout_it_out.php#more [i]Failed experiment”, Jeremy Sear An Onomous Lefty[/i] Likewise if the Liberals have more than 50% of the seats. If one party has a majority in its own right, it can (and they do) treat parliament with contempt. It doesn’t need any of the rest of them http://anonymouslefty.wordpress.com/2011/05/30/failed-experiment/ [i]Newspoll: 52-48 to Coalition, Essential Research 54-46, William Bowe, The Poll Bludger[/i] shows the Coalition’s eight point two-party lead cut to four. Labor is up a point on the primary vote to 34 per cent and the Coalition down two to 44 per cent, while the Greens have shot up four points to 14 per cent. http://blogs.crikey.com.au/pollbludger/ [i]The Slagging and bagging of 'Carbon Cat' Blanchett, Malcolm Farnsworth, The Drum[/i] The default position of the Opposition is to smear and traduce anyone who has the temerity to disagree with them or express any sympathy with a government policy. http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/2737030.html [i]News Limited doesn't like ads made by millionaires, Peter Martin[/i] News Limited papers yesterday attacked Ms Blanchett for self indulgently campaigning for a tax she would find it easy to pay. http://www.petermartin.com.au/2011/05/news-limited-doesnt-like-ads-made-by.html [i]Dick Smith: Rupert, come back to Oz, we need you, Dick Smith, Crikey[/i] Sunday Telegraph attacking Cate Blanchett’s leadership on this issue. It seems it’s OK for Rupert to support a price on carbon with his $6 billion wealth but not for Cate. http://www.crikey.com.au/2011/05/30/dick-smith-rupert-come-back-to-oz-we-need-you/ [i]UK leading the way, John Quiggin[/i] * The idea that “Australia risks getting out in front of the world” is obviously false. Even assuming we get a carbon tax, leading on to an emissions trading scheme later this decade, we will be a decade or so behind the UK and other EU countries, http://johnquiggin.com/2011/05/30/uk-leading-the-way/#more-9836 [i]Climate change denial with the Galileo Movement,all the usual suspects, Barry Everingham, Independent Australia[/i] The Movement’s panel of advisors are: Andrew Bolt, Ian Plimer, Bob Carter and David Flint —his great and good mate Alan Jones is the Movement’s “patron”. http://www.independentaustralia.net/2011/republic/climate-change-denial-with-the-galileo-movement-all-the-usual-suspects/ [i]Getting Alan Jones up to speed on the NBN, Rod Tucker, The Conversation[/i] Jones claimed that because this speed exceeds the capabilities of the NBN, the researchers’ announcement was proof that the NBN would be outdated by the time it is completed before the end of the decade.Jones did not seem to realise that the announcement demonstrated the exact opposite http://theconversation.edu.au/getting-alan-jones-up-to-speed-on-the-nbn-1539 [i]The excitement builds ... , David Havyatt, Anything Goes[/i]That really does sum up the challenge - and much of that can be rolled into the rubric of "the Digital Economy" if by that term we mean an entire economy transformed by the digital revolution, not a subset of it http://davidhavyatt.blogspot.com/2011/05/excitement-builds.html [i]When the sideshow becomes the main game, Brian McNair, The Conversation[/i] Tanner is right, too, to identify the merging of the worlds of politics and celebrity. The lines between public and private lives have been blurred in recent decades, with fewer and fewer constraints http://theconversation.edu.au/when-the-sideshow-becomes-the-main-game-575?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=tweetbutton&utm_campaign=footer [i]Blanchett exposed for the 'crime' of speaking up , Tom Arup, National Times[/i] Last year, Australia's richest person Gina Rinehart — worth $10.3 billion on last count — climbed on the back of a truck with a megaphone to campaign against the mining super profits tax.http://www.nationaltimes.com.au/opinion/politics/blanchett-exposed-for-the-crime-of-speaking-up-20110530-1fbdm.html

lyn

31/05/2011Hi Ad David's article only just came hot of the press, one minute late for Today's Links: Ad, could you include David's link on the special page for me please. Jokers to my Right, David Horton, The Watermelon Blog Tony continues to oppose absolutely everything the government proposes, no matter how much of benefit to the public, http://davidhortonsblog.com/2011/05/31/jokers-to-my-right/

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Talk Turkey, I noticed a microphone guy running around the floor of the Defence Force headquarters briefing room this morning in order to catch the questions from the reporters re the latest deaths in Afghanistan of our brave Diggers.

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011LYN'S DAILY LINKS updated: http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/page/Lyns-Daily-Links.aspx

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011Hi Lyn I've added David Horton's piece to the top of the list on your special page. Again, thank you for a great set of links.

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Just watching & listening to Senator Conroy addressing the CeBit Conference at Darling Harbour on the NBN: http://www.nbn.gov.au/

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Minister Conroy announcing $28 million for Digital Hubs to enable residents without digital connections to understand what the internet is and can do for them. It will go to all 41 initial digital NBN hubs.

Feral Skeleton

31/05/201126% of all Australian households do not use the Internet. Mainly the elderly, the poor, Indigenous Australians & remote and rural Australia.

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Digital Enterprise Program announced for SMEs and NFPs to advise them on how to utilise the NBN. $12 million allocated. Health announcement: Doctor's surgeries, Hospitals, Aged Care facilities, and Pharmacies to all be linked via Tele Health. $3.5 million for trial for In Home treatment for their Diabetes, to be conducted in the Townsville region. $2 million to Princess Alexandra Hospital for Tele Health. Education: NBN-enabled Skills and Service program for online interactive education services, facilitating workplace training and skills enhancement. $27.2 million. In Armidale $3.5 million for Interactive Learning Space and Virtual Learning Laboratories. Aim:innovative and flexible learning services via TAFE, Universities & schools. National Digital Economy Strategy. Revamped NBN website. 20 Experts in their fields have agreed to become government partners to explain transformative benefits of the NBN. NBN Sharing Buttons on new website to facilitate conversations about the NBN, Creative Commons Licence.

Michael

31/05/2011Today's Bad Abbott: Kicking Cate. Because it demonstrates his entire approach - "no prisoners". But that entails no dignity, no respect, no values. Which boils down to... no leadership characteristics for guiding a nation. Just a lynching party.

TalkTurkey

31/05/2011FS said ". . . the latest deaths in Afghanistan of our brave Diggers." I guess I'll be subject to a military fatwah for saying this . . . but I think genuine Diggers could be pretty peeed off with today's careerist mercenaries being afforded that noble appellation. "Third tour of duty" etc? Money money money! Or am I just being ungrateful to those who have saved Australia from invasion by Afghans? If anyone else thinks as I do will you please speak up? I need someone to cover my back!

lyn

31/05/2011Hi Ad Thankyou for adding the link to David Horton for me. Also I hope I didn't sound stupid putting up the link to Switzer’s quote. I agree with you totally, he is of a different persuasion to us. I meant to tell I didn't agree with his other words. Actually thinking about the article more, really, he was being sarcastic. Cheers

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Talk Turkey, Yes, the Armed Forces personnel need to make a living just like any other citizen, and some of them join the Armed Forces for altruistic reasons, such as protecting East Timor from the Indonesians, for example, and such like, and some who believe that their service helps to protect their country and defend it. Others, are less noble in their motivations. Some just do it to get a Trade and get paid well for learning it, much better than Apprentices do in the civilian populatiion. I am never going to be one who tries to tar them all with one brush to suit my own personal ideological perpectives. I may disagree with their Mission, at one time or another, but I will not let that colour my opinion of them. And I certainly won't be calling them 'Mercenaries' on the very day that two of their comrades have died. Died trying to stop the vile Taliban taking control of Afghanistan again. One Taliban-controlled country, with all it's attendant bastardry and misogyny is enough for me. Thus I will forever support any mission which seeks to keep those wolves from Afghanistan's door.

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Michael, You should read this: http://www.thepunch.com.au/articles/its-a-bit-rich-to-gag-the-wealthy-on-carbon-pricing/ Then be appalled at the vile attacks on Malcolm Farr in the comments below the article.

Jason

31/05/2011AA, After watching Q&A last night I've come to the conclusion that what ever is good for Western Sydney must be good for all of us! It would seem that no matter the line up of the show,the audience is still from Sydney. Perhaps the show could do a capital city on a rolling basis each week as I'm sick of hearing about the ills of western Sydney week after week, as if there are no concerns in the rest of the country.

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011Hi Lyn I’m glad you posted the Switzer article so that its flaws could be exposed. Some of what he said about leadership was germane, but going the next step – that Julia Gillard needed a ‘crash course in leadership’ – revealed his arrogance in presuming to diagnose her leadership ‘problems’ and a solution. He was not smart enough to disguise his allegiances, using the words ‘lie’ and ‘costly journey’ to describe the carbon tax. How much credence did he expect balanced readers to give to his advice to the PM when later in his piece he aligned himself against one of her key policies? Only he could answer that.

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011FS The venom of those who hate Julia Gillard knows no bounds, so if a columnist seems to lean ever so slightly towards her, or supports anyone who endorses Government policies, as Malcolm Farr did in [i]It’s a bit rich to gag the wealthy on carbon pricing[/i] he gets a dose of venom too. http://www.thepunch.com.au/articles/its-a-bit-rich-to-gag-the-wealthy-on-carbon-pricing/ Jason You are right – Jackie Kelly’s rather supercilious comments about Western Sydney revealed why it has become such a hot spot for politicians. While political parties with a solid majority could afford to ignore what people in Western Sydney, when the margin is small, every seat counts and Western Sydney gets attention because it’s marginal.

Gravel

31/05/2011Ad Astra Wow, to rewrite your original is a fantastic effort on your part. I haven't got anything to add to what the others have said. As to how to actually present something like this, I think no matter how Labor or Julia do this they will get lambasted by the media. I know I'm being pessimistic but I was going to write a saga about listening to the radio (abc) this morning from just before 4am waiting for the newspoll results........still waiting till 6.30am.....glad I didn't hold my breath. I then made the assumption that Labor had improved which it turned out they did.

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011And now for something completely different. This is the other side of the Climate Change coin as presented by John Birmingham in a Fairfax paper: http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/opinion/blogs/blunt-instrument/no-carbon-tax-europe-will-make-us-pay-instead-20110530-1fcu9.html

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011Gravel Thank you for your kind remarks. If the message about health is now reasonably worded, as several have suggested, it is time to talk about how the message is to be delivered. First, a better name than ‘Fireside Chat’ is needed, and a suitable setting. janice suggests a ‘talk’ from a cosy living room setting. So folks, lets have your suggestions for a name for these events and a process of transmission, not forgetting the social media. The job is but half finished.

nasking

31/05/2011"Jackie Kelly’s rather supercilious comments about Western Sydney revealed why it has become such a hot spot for politicians." Ad, good work above... Kelly still brings up the bile in me when I see her. Listening to her disingenuous words when it comes to some issues makes me wanna throw a shoe at the tele. I believe the woman is bigtime BSer & it does not surprise me she has risen again to support the BSer Coalition led by Abbott in their increasingly insipid attempts to knock down the carbon price and bring on another election. Memories that shoulda been brought up last night on Q&A: Jackie Kelly cops a serve on Seven - Election 2007 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqDHdReWlX4 "I knew nothing, I knew nothing" Yep, another Old Guard Liberal from the Honest John era spruikin' the BS. If I were Western Sydney residents & businesses I'd be pretty pissed that this character thinks she represnts the lot of them. How arrogant, assumptive & reductionist can ya get? Notice how the Coalition members often speak for US. As tho those greedters, over-the-top religious wankers, warmongers, xenophobes, convenient socialists, fake libertarians, inconsistent free traders represent all the workers. What a joke! There are some decent characters in the Coalition...but they're too oft gagged & sat on & outnumbered by the rest of the bottom dwellers, unfortunately. Nothing inspiring about them...nor progressive. And the OLD GUARD LIBERALS keep popping up like the living dead...attempting to suck the life outa change, compassion, hope, real reform, innovative ideas & projects, the better Australia. Sickened by live exports...but I can think of some I'd like to send to Indonesia on a one-way ticket. Please sign the petition: Ban Live Export http://www.getup.org/campaigns/animals/live-export/ban-live-export 42, 425 good Aussies have so far. Cheers N'

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Nasking, You have to admit that Labor acted quicker on Live Exports than Howard ever did. It's not a total ban but it's a significant move nonetheless.

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011Nasking That YouTube Clip brings back memories of a resounding Labor victory. From last night’s performance we might reasonably conclude that Jackie Kelly has thrown off the despondency she exhibited on that fateful night.

NormanK

31/05/2011What a bunch of hopeless regressive rednecks those Queenslanders are, eh? :) [b]Qld cropping land protected from mining[/b] [quote]Key food-growing areas in Queensland will be protected immediately from mining and other development under an Australian-first policy.[/quote] http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/qld-cropping-land-protected-from-mining-20110531-1fe4q.html

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Hi guys! very good blog post on The Australian's war on ABC Left Wing Bias: http://spongeist.wordpress.com/2011/05/31/the-australian-the-abc-and-media-bias/#wpl-likebox

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011NormanK, That smile will be wiped off your face when Can Do Smoke and Mirrors gets in and changes the legislation. Just like they have done in NSW and Victoria when it has suited them to.

Miglo

31/05/2011Hello Swordsfolk. Norman, you can visit the Café and self promote your wonderful articles whenever you like. I apologise for not responding earlier but time gets away from me far too easily. I'm noticing a swell over the internet lately that is rising against Tony Abbott and the style of the Murdoch media. Let's hope this momentum can be maintained. We all know it takes a lot of effort and everyone here has contributed. Since Australian Blog Sites was hacked I am unable to make any edits to the site, ie, add new links or update other sections. Only the Twitter feed and the video links can be updated (as they are done off-site). Nonetheless, the existing links still work and I can be thankful for that. I've purchased the site for two years so I'll let it run its course and in the meantime work on alternatives. Even though the site has been closed for comments for some time, I still get about 100 spam entries a day, which indicates the site gets many visitors. Cheers. Migs.

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Anyone up for reading 13 pages about how Unfair & Unbalanced Fox News Network is? http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/how-roger-ailes-built-the-fox-news-fear-factory-20110525

nasking

31/05/2011Ad, Useful speech above...but it's important to mention dental care funding...hopefully they're incremental moves towards a Denticare system. Rotting teeth & gums threaten health, including contributing to heart problems. It's not only about alleviating pain...but also necessary preventative care. Relying on fluoride in drinking water to do the job is just not good enuff. Great effort on yer part tho. Feral, the government could do more. But then could so many Aussies. Domestic animals like cows & sheep are not carnivores...yet they are treated worse than many an animal that is a consumer of other animals & humans. Herded off to slaughter because they contain more water & over years have evolved into cowed, compliant creatures. All very sad really. Banning live exports is the least we can do for these creatures who are bred into a DOOMED life. We oft say that serial killers begin by treating animals cruelly. What does all this say about the average human? Cheers N'

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011Folks I’m waiting for suggestions about how Julia Gillard might transmit her messages on a variety of policy topics to the electorate. Acknowledging that the electorate is not homogenous, several methods of transmission might be needed. Since some of you feel the idea of the PM having a ‘fireside chat’ to the people is not suitable in the 21st century, what should she use instead? Having a message is just the start. She and her Government have been roundly criticized as poor at communication with the masses. So what should she do? Given the words, how does she get them out to the people in convincing fashion?

Jason

31/05/2011Whilst listening to question time today! Harry named the member for Patterson, it went to the vote and was lost. Windsor and Katter left the Chamber and Bandt and Wilkie voted with the government. Abbott quickly jumped up and moved a vote of confidence and seconded by the PM but one of the men who gave us the new parliament Oakeshott voted with the opposition because he doesn't think members should be tossed then spoke on the motion to support the speaker! You are a fool Oakeshott!

NormanK

31/05/2011Ad astra Since no-one else has stuck their head up, I'll give it a go. I am soooooo last century. I imagine a prime time slot on ABC1 and give the Leader of the Opposition the right of reply. Publish the speech in full in a major newspaper and put the video out on social media. Social media alone is not the answer because it wouldn't reach me, for example. As for the title, I can't think of anything which wouldn't be staid or (alternatively) too sexy. 'Address to the Nation' 'National Report' 'Report to the Nation' 'Gillard Dumps on Rudd' (at least you'd get an audience) I like the idea of an informal setting rather than an office. How about in a pub with a carefully selected audience? :) FS [i]Can Do[/i] better not count his chickens, his colleagues in other states are not exactly acting as a good advertisement for a change to a conservative government. Miglo Cheers.

Jason

31/05/2011House of Representatives Speaker Harry Jenkins considered resigning after a ruling he made to eject an MP from Parliament was defeated this afternoon. Mr Jenkins named Opposition backbencher Bob Baldwin for allegedly rowdy behaviour, meaning a vote would be taken on whether he should be suspended for 24 hours. But the vote was lost 72-71 when independent Rob Oakeshott joined forces with the Opposition. Having failed to win his vote, Mr Jenkins said he would take some time to "consider my position" and decide if he should resign. But Opposition Leader Tony Abbott - despite leading his party in opposing the Speaker's motion - was quickly on his feet to move a confidence motion in Mr Jenkins. He said the Parliament is in "uncharted and difficult parliamentary waters" in its minority Government make-up. "In the circumstances when the Government can't naturally command a majority, the job of the speakership is even more difficult than usual," he said. Mr Abbott told said Mr Jenkins under "difficult circumstances" had done his job with "commendable impartiality and considerable forbearance". "All members of this house from time to time try your patience. I know from time to time I do. I suspect from time to time the Prime Minister does," he said. Saying that all members try to score "political points", he said no-one in the Opposition has "anything but respect" for the job the Speaker does. "We do have deep and abiding confidence in your ability to run this house," he said. "Please, Mr Speaker, do not add to the difficulties of this day by feeling you cannot continue in the chair." In another unusual move, the motion was seconded by his opponent, Prime Minister Julia Gillard, who said the job does is not an easy one. In what could be seen as a swipe at Mr Oakeshott, Ms Gillard said members had an obligation to support the Speaker's rulings. She said that due to the make-up of the Parliament, Mr Jenkins should not consider his position, but rather acknowledge the vote. Ms Gillard urged the Opposition to back the Speaker's rulings if they have confidence in him. Mr Oakeshott said he also had full confidence in the Speaker, but his vote against Mr Jenkins' ruling was "not without precedent". "Where possible [I try] to defend a private member's rights within this chamber," he said. "If I don't hear or see a particular issue that leads to a member being named, then I would have difficulty doing anything else but to defend that member's rights." The confidence motion was carried on the voices.

lyn

31/05/2011Hi Ad Mr Speaker Harry Jenkiins neraly resigned today, Speaker Harry Jenkins considers resigning after his authority is challenged in parliament , Ben Packman, The Australian The ballot, which was effectively a vote of no confidence in the Speaker, represented the biggest crisis of parliamentary procedure in nearly 40 years. Realising Mr Jenkins might feel obliged to resign, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott immediately moved a motion in support of the Speaker. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/speaker-harry-jenkins-came-close-to-resigning-after-his-authority-was-challenged-in-parliament/story-fn59niix-1226066586254 Some tweets about Harry Jenkins GrogsGamut Greg Jericho The speed with which TA rose to move a motion supporting Jenkins suggests he very much did not want another election for the speakership AshGhebranious AshGhebranious #auspol so Abbott says this country needs an election! He is given a chance that can lead to election. He declines to take out his threat. vexnews vexnews Abbott panicked about the prospect of Peter Slipper becoming Speaker of Reps http://j.mp/kFkkyB Cheers Lyn

lyn

31/05/2011Hi Ad Sorry I've mucked up nearly and Jenkins .

Jason

31/05/2011Oakeshott "If I don't hear or see a particular issue that leads to a member being named, then I would have difficulty doing anything else but to defend that member's rights." Why not Abstain? how can you "defend" anyone if you didn't see or hear anything? as I said Fool!

lyn

31/05/2011Hi Jason Looks like I was posting the Mr Speaker story the same time as you were posting. If I'm Posting straight from an article it is necessary for me to hold up the comments box while I go away and come back, go away and come back, go away and come back. Sorry Jason. Thankyou for your interesting post. Rob Oakshott well! I think you said it all, I didn't really mean to say goofy.

Jason

31/05/2011Lyn, That's OK! I'm just p#ssed off with the behavior of the two independents, who for all their conditions that they put on both Labor and the coalition to clean up question time one voted against and one wasn't there! Hypocrites.

NormanK

31/05/2011Jason You'd love to have Oakshott as a referee if you were a linesman wouldn't you? "I have complete confidence in my linesmen but I didn't see the elbow to the face so I have to give the benefit of the doubt to the player." Oakshott has a strictly defined code of honour which is bound to get him into trouble sometimes.

Jason

31/05/2011Normank, I bet the likes of Les Boyd wished Oakeshott was a ref in his day! I just find the whole thing today strange.

David Horton

31/05/2011Ad, title is difficult. "Between you and me" might avoid some of the twee connotations of "fireside" (and other possibilities that occur to me like "while the billy boils" "over the garden fence") while giving that personal interaction connotation I think is the key to this concept.

Jason

31/05/2011Garnaut Climate Change Review http://www.garnautreview.org.au/update-2011/garnaut-review-2011.html

David Horton

31/05/2011Miglo, puzzled about the Australian Blogs site, that is a great pity. I don't know anything about the structure of this site, but is it not possible to delete the material that is there and entirely replace it with a newly generated page?

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Interesting, wasn't it? Abbott had a gold-plated chance land in his lap this afternoon to force a Constitutional Crisis Election, like he has been yammering about for months, with the defeat of the Speaker's Ruling, but he just didn't have the plums to take advantage of it like Malcolm Fraser did. :)

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011Can't wait to read what Grog makes of it all.

Feral Skeleton

31/05/2011How about, [b]'The PM's Informational Conversationals'[/b]? It would make people sit up annd take notice, which is always the hardest goal to achieve.

Miglo

31/05/2011David, it doesn't recognize my user name or password anymore. Perhaps I could take that up with my English web host.

David Horton

31/05/2011Miglo, yes, they should be able to reset for you. That's too valuable a resource to lose.

2353

31/05/2011Years ago in the "Grand old days of Bjelke Petersen", the Queensland Government (as well as the ALP run Brisbane City Council) ran regular weekly advertorial sized spots on TV to "inform" the community. While some of the information presented certainly had a political overtone - especially the Queensland Govt spots, at the end of the day they did contain useful information. It wasn't always Bjelke-Petersen or Clem Jones peering down the camera lens, other politicians had a go at times. Maybe the concept could be updated for the 21st century (either by agreement with commercial TV stations or legislation if necessary) so the Government can explain what its doing and why. The TV spot could be backed up with a text version on a dedicated website and maybe in the SMH, Age, Courier Mail etc. If it is acceptable for Government Service Providers such as Health Districts, Public Transport operators to have a regular media spot to advise of service alterations and changes - surely it's not a great leap to allow the Government to explain policy and programs. Who knows it might even stop the endless advertising of new programs that the LNP seem to do when they were in power.

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011Folks I have just posted [i]Post-Truth Politics[/i] by Hillbilly Skeleton which I am sure you will find thought-provoking and challenging. http://www.thepoliticalsword.com

Ad astra reply

31/05/2011Folks I will respond tomorrow to your comments about how to transmit Julia Gillard's Fireside Chat - Your Health.

Jason

1/06/2011AA, I see in Oakeshott's presser today he now says the next time he doesn't hear or see the "incident" he will ask the speaker! You can only wonder why this has never occurred to him in the past,or why he of all people who wanted question time to be conducted in a more civil manner thinks an MP who gets named after repeated warnings deserves not to be disciplined!

Ad astra reply

1/06/2011Folks This is a follow up to the last two posts: [i]Julia Gillard’s Fireside Chats – Your Health[/i] Mark 1 and 2. Here’s what you had to say: [b]Suggested names for the ‘chat’:[/b] [i]Julia Gillard to address nation 

Julia Gillard to talk to Australia 

 PM talks turkey to the populace Julia Gillard talks to (or with) the nation Julia Gillard’s conversation with the nation Address to the Nation National Report Report to the Nation Gillard Dumps on Rudd (to attract attention!) The PM's Informational Conversationals Between you and me[/i] [b]The setting:[/b] [i]A cosy informal setting rather than an office A pub with a carefully selected audience[/i] I would add: A community forum prior to the question time A community setting appropriate to the subject (a healthcare setting when health was the subject, or a school when the subject was the NBN) [b]The medium:[/b] The most comprehensive response was from 2353: “[i]Maybe the concept could be updated for the 21st century (either by agreement with commercial TV stations or legislation if necessary) so the Government can explain what its doing and why. The TV spot could be backed up with a text version on a dedicated website and maybe in the SMH, Age, Courier Mail etc. If it is acceptable for Government Service Providers such as Health Districts, Public Transport operators to have a regular media spot to advise of service alterations and changes - surely it's not a great leap to allow the Government to explain policy and programs. “[/i] Although social media were mentioned as more up-to-date than a fireside chat there has been no specific advice forthcoming about how YouTube, Facebook, Twitter or any of the others might be employed. As I’m new to these, some suggestions about how they might be used would be helpful. I can see that these media might be valuable as a supplement to a main event. I am still of the view that these exercises in communication need to be devised on a national front and broadcast on TV and radio, augmented by posting on a Government website, by an email from the PM, by cooperative blogs, in newspapers and via social media outlets. Thank you to those of you made suggestions. Any further ones, especially about alternative modes of communication, would be welcome.
How many umbrellas are there if I start with two and take 2 away?