• Sitting astride the barbed wire fence
    The human mind is a wonderful thing. We all have different interests,
    ideas and methods of doing what is needed to stay alive. We also have
    different beliefs. Some will tell you that the contrails left in the sky following
    the passage of aircraft are a 24/7/365-day aerosol assault over our heads made
    of a toxic brew of poisonous heavy metals, chemicals, and other dangerous ingredients.
  • #30 year challenge
    There is a social media meme at the moment where two photos are posted
    side by side, one from 2009 the other from 2019. ‘Bonus points’ are apparently
    gained by ‘featuring’ a similar pose in both photos. As everything is apparently
    better with a hashtag, this latest fad is tagged as the #10yearchallenge.
  • Global problems cast a gloomy shadow
    What better time to take a look at our world, our planet, than at the beginning
    of another year? Long past are the days when we could retreat into a comfortable
    cocoon with no windows to the wider world. Unless we turn off our radios, television,
    our computers and the Internet, and never look at print media, we cannot avoid
    exposure to the world’s events, redolent as they are with worrisome overtones.
  • Job Number 1
    They say it’s nice to start with a win. So as we get down to business for another
    year let’s celebrate a small win (‘I told you so’ is so 2018!). In May 2015, The
    Political Sword discussed the release of Anglicare’s annual rental affordability
    snapshot, which highlighted that 8 of the 65,614 properties available for rent across
    Australia met the affordability requirements for a single person on Youth Allowance.
  • Why is there still so much anger?
    As we enter the Festive Season, we reflect on the year past and
    the one ahead. It’s a time when Christians celebrate Christmas and
    other special days, Jewish folk enjoy Hanukkah, Mexicans celebrate
    the Fiesta of our Lady of Guadalupe, and Swedes celebrate St Lucia
    Day. The New Year is ushered in as an opportunity for new hope.
  • Let's Dance
    In a recent email, Virginia Trioli wrote in relation to Christmas Parties: Go hard
    or go home. Say something. Talk — really talk — about your life, your triumphs,
    your failures; your year of struggle or your reflections on another milestone
    reached; your pride, your joy, the moments of grace remembered or sought:
    or don’t talk, don’t just chatter, and how about we just stand in companionable silence...

The Political Sword

Get the inside track on the media and government.

Why are Abbott’s conservatives destroying our PM?

To those of you who dispute the assertion embedded in the title, let me provide you with supporting evidence. First some questions for you to answer: Is Malcolm Turnbull the man you thought he was when he rolled Tony Abbott almost a year ago? Has he fulfilled your initial expectations? ...

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The democratisation of opinion

With the rise of the internet and social media almost anyone can express their opinion to an audience in the thousands, even hundreds of thousands, no longer just to a circle of people who are physically present to hear the opinion. While that provides the democratisation of opinion, it also has a m...

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Make laugh – not war

A couple of weeks ago, our esteemed blogmaster Ad Astra published a piece asking ‘Why is there so much anger?’ It’s a good question.  Sociologists will tell us that whatever position a person takes on a particular subject, there will be some who agree, some who disagree and some who don’t ...

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Johno goes to heaven

Johno was (as they say in the classics) a good and decent man. When he dies, he goes to heaven, and St Peter shows him around. They go past one room, and Johno asks: ‘Who are all those people in there?’ ‘They are the Methodists,’ says St Peter. They pass another room, and Johno asks the same questio...

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Why is there so much anger?

No matter when we listen to the news, watch TV, or browse social media, the pervading emotion in so many items is anger, unremitting anger. We see it in the wars in the Middle East and among terrorist organizations. We are told it is what motivates individual terrorists.  Social commenta...

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Someone’s gotta pay

According to the Coalition government, the ALP’s campaign over the privatisation of Medicare was somewhere between dishonest and outright lies. While it is true that the Coalition has frozen some Medicare rebates and eliminated others, attempted to introduce a $7 co-payment to see a doctor in the 20...

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Mr Turnbull, where are your verbs?

It was one of The Political Sword’s regular contributors, Casablanca, who drew my attention to the absence of a verb in the Coalition’s prime slogan ‘Jobs and Growth’. She had been alerted by an article in The Guardian by Van Badham in May: Good slogan, Malcolm Turnbull, but growth in what kind of j...

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The Liberals are dreaming

On Sunday morning 10 July, before Shorten conceded defeat in the election, Arthur Sinodinos appeared on the ABC’s Insiders. He claimed the Coalition had a ‘mandate’ for its 2016 budget and its company tax cuts. Sinodinos’s view takes no account of the reality of the new parliament.  Althoug...

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Just do your job

Fairfax media’s Matthew Knott asked the other day ‘Election 2016: The uncomfortable truth is the media got it wrong. How did we do it’. It’s a good question.  Knott details issues such as the polls showing split results for months prior to the election yet the betting agencies supporting th...

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How has it come to this?

The MSM and blog sites abound with critiques of the election and tentative predictions of the political outcomes. So why bother writing yet another to explain how it has all come to this? You will judge whether this analysis adds anything useful. Far from fulfilling his oft repeated promise of s...

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The Liberal lie continues

In his speech on election night, as reported by The Guardian, Malcolm Turnbull: … accused the Labor party of running “some of the most systematic, well-funded lies ever peddled in Australia” in a campaign in which Labor claimed the Coalition was planning to privatise the government funded health i...

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G’day America

Hi, howyagoin? We hear that you are having a real problem with who is going to be your next president. We’ve done our election and gone back to the beach!  If we understand the issues correctly, there is the choice of a property tycoon who seems to be able to lend his name to a lot of develop...

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Your vote is valuable

Over the past couple of months, Turnbull, Shorten, Di Natalie and others have been attempting to convince you that they are worthy of your first preference vote. The usual claim is that your vote is valuable. Guess what — it is. Every first preference vote cast at the election on 2 July is worth $2....

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Turnbull’s Medicare backflip — or is it?

Turnbull recently announced that his government, if re-elected, will not change any element of Medicare. It came in response to Labor’s campaigning that Medicare was under threat, that it would be privatised under a Liberal government. The general media response was to take Turnbull at his word and ...

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Your call is important

To paraphrase, hell hath no fury like a politician scorned. Dennis Jensen, MP for the seat of Tangney, was not preselected by the Liberal Party to recontest the seat in Parliament. He is running as an independent. Jensen recently claimed Liberal MPs use database software to profile constituents and ...

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The tale of two Daleks

Good Daleks are hard to find. They’re expensive. But for the Treasury and the Department of Finance, no cost is too high. So they spared no expense in their search for reliable Daleks that could repeat their messages tirelessly. They had hoped to find some with a rudimentary knowledge of economics a...

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Time for a new economic model

Late in the 1970s Keynesian economics was largely abandoned when it failed to explain the stagflation that had occurred during that decade. Recently, in my piece ‘What economic plan?’, I quoted an Australian analyst with the CBA who suggested that recent national data released by the ABS was showing...

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Feed a man a fish

Those who missed the ABC’s Lateline last Wednesday night lost the opportunity to learn about a private (they would prefer the term ‘independent’) school in Sydney that actually seems to want to make a difference.  Barker College, a co-educational school in the Anglican tradition, based at Hor...

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Turnbull is selling us a pup

You all know what that idiomatic expression means – being tricked into buying something that is worthless. It arose from the old swindle of selling a bag that purportedly contained a piglet, but instead there was a puppy inside. PM Turnbull wants you to believe that his bag contains a piglet, bu...

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The economics of debating

Economists will tell you that they practise a science in a similar way to chemists, biologists and physicists. If certain inputs are made to solve an economic problem, there will be a certain result. Other scientists also use the same process, a chemist will tell you if you add certain quantities ...

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