Truth in advertising?

Let me start off with a confession: I like French cars. So much so that I have been a regular poster on Aussiefrogs.com.au for a number of years. I could bore you silly with the differences between a 2009 and a 2012 Peugeot. But I won’t.

Like most internet forums I have seen, and heard about, there is an ‘off-topic’ area on Aussiefrogs that a certain level of membership will allow you to access. Aussiefrogs calls their off-topic thread ‘The Toad Pond’.

Someone recently posed there the question of the future of interest rates under the new Federal Government. After a number of comments from others, I made a comment that the last time the ‘official interest rate’ fell under a Coalition Government was in 2001.

The reality is that official interest rates are controlled by the Reserve Bank of Australia Board. But both sides of politics have claimed in the past (and probably will in the future) that ‘Interest rates will always be lower under a [insert party name here] Government’, while suggesting the media should call out both political parties for blatantly misleading statements.

In The Toad Pond I then pined for a return of some truth in political reporting – if not politics itself. Following my comment there came a number of good-natured ones suggesting that my request for a tad of truth in politics was an impossible dream (as well as questioning my grasp of reality).

The Reserve Bank of Australia’s website states:

The Governor and the Treasurer have agreed that the appropriate target for monetary policy in Australia is to achieve an inflation rate of 2–3 per cent, on average, over the cycle. This is a rate of inflation sufficiently low that it does not materially distort economic decisions in the community. Seeking to achieve this rate, on average, provides discipline for monetary policy decision-making, and serves as an anchor for private-sector inflation expectations.

Clearly, while the government of the day’s policy affects to some extent the monetary policy of the RBA, so does the world economy and other factors that will, in the view of the RBA Board, have a good or bad effect on the Australian economy. Effectively, ‘monetary policy’ is a tool used by the RBA to maintain inflation within the two to three per cent target band, and it changes its policy to achieve that result.

Financial institutions determine their interest rates in some shape of form using the ‘official rate’ from the RBA: products such as home loans are deemed to be newsworthy and usually track fairly closely to the current RBA determination. Business loans and instruments such as credit cards, which don’t really generate as many headlines, are not as volatile. While it might be nice for the Government’s Treasurer to stand in front of the press and suggest that he and the Government he is a member of have produced a fantastic result, in reality they had little to do with it. The recent policy of some banks to set rates independently of RBA decisions bears this out.

So I ponder:

Why are politicians allowed to claim credit for decisions they had little input into?

How is it they are able to make such misleading statements as well?

And how did they get away with the recent bout of election advertising that promised the world if we voted for whomever?


It has long been understood in Australia that there is some legislation that deals with truth in advertising. Clearly, claims that official interest rates will always be lower if a certain party is in power are incorrect because the RBA sets the ‘official interest rate’, not the government of the day.

If we look at the ACCC website, we find a number of organisations that determine if advertising is basically truthful, and that a number of these organisations publish their results.

The ACCC states that:

Honest advertising practices are not just good for business – they are required by law. The Australian Consumer Law contains a number of rules that businesses must follow when advertising and selling products and services …

A number of industry groups regulate advertising within their specific area of expertise, with assistance or oversight from the ACCC. In the case of vehicle manufacturers/importers, that industry body is the Federal Chamber of Automotive (FCAI) Industries. One of the issues FCAI monitor is the impression of ‘dangerous driving’ as reported on the Car Advice website recently when people complained about the lack of truth in a Nissan advertisement, where:

… the ad shows a man driving through the streets as his seemingly pregnant wife is in the passenger seat appearing to be in labor. When the couple arrives at a hospital, the man looks at his watch and proclaims a “personal best”, then the woman lifts her jumper to reveal a pillow playing the part of the baby bump. Reported by Mumbrella, the ASB investigated the ad following complaints that is [sic] displayed dangerous and illegal behaviour and promoted unsafe driving.

Apparently the Nissan advertisement was filmed at slow speed and ‘sped up’ using a faster frame speed and the addition of ‘suitable’ noises. There are two versions of the ad: the second was missing a number of tyre-screeching and engine revving sounds that the first advertisement contained.

In May 2012:

The Federal Government instituted an enquiry to investigate concerns that some ads promote dangerous driving. The inquiry comes in the wake of several car ads falling foul of the advertising watchdog, including an ad for Volvo V60 that this month was ruled to give an impression of ''reckless speed'' and ''unsafe driving''.

Volvo agreed to pull the ad from television after the Advertising Standards Board ruled it should be modified or withdrawn. Last month a Suzuki ad was changed after the ASB determined it promoted reckless driving.


Numerous examples of regulation are available: from protecting people from medicines that have no clinical proof of actually doing what they are claimed to do, to the colours and descriptions of foodstuffs, to claims that are unsubstantiated – such as sugar-filled cereals being ‘good for you’. While opinions may vary on the justification for regulation that can ban advertising that:

  • can be construed as dangerous driving,
  • suggests a medical benefit from taking tablets when there is no proof
  • promotes consumption of food with dubious health claims,
there is here an underlying theme: protecting society from harm.

Why isn’t the act of a political leader offering obvious falsehoods, such as ‘interest rates will always be lower’, also considered ‘illegal’ - given the regulatory theme of protecting society from harm?

Because it isn’t.

The Australian Electoral Commission’s Backgrounder on political advertising states that politicians or potential politicians can advertise whatever they like, provided they do not mislead or deceive us on how to cast a valid vote.

So, the situation is that Nissan, Volvo, Kelloggs or any other company advertising in Australia must remain within the bounds of truth, or someone will complain to the appropriate advertising standards agency. But if you are a politician, the content of your advertising is not regulated, provided you don’t suggest to people they ‘vote early and vote often’ or imply they don’t vote (because ‘it only encourages them’). Even worse, the politicians voted on this law, with an obvious double standard entrenched in its legislation.

Our politicians can tell us that they will ‘stop the boats’, ‘rectify a budget emergency’ (which has suddenly disappeared since 13 September) or anything else they like without any fear of exposure, legal consequences or, sadly, examination by a complacent media.

Why is it that society needs to be protected from ‘perceptions of dangerous driving’ when most drivers are well aware of the implications of the act while society is deemed to be quite able to determine the accuracy of arcane claims by politicians, such as ‘interest rates will always be lower’, without any requirement that the claim has any fact to it at all?

What is the real problem here:


  • that the Electoral Act doesn’t regulate the content of political advertising, or
  • that society, as demonstrated by a number of people in ‘The Toad Pond’, understands, accepts and is comfortable with the suggestion that politicians cannot be believed?
I’m not sure. The people are not ‘storming the barricades’ to eliminate such an obvious double standard.

What do you think?

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Janet (j4gypsy)

30/09/2013Your first piece, ‘Truth in advertising?’ on [i]TPS[/i] under its new management is from someone you know very well indeed, 2353, who has long been a valued contributor to the comments on [i]The Political Sword[/i]. It is wonderful for the [i]TPS[/i] family to have one of its own provide our first discussion-starter. 2353 tells us that this is his second blog post on a political blog – the first has long ago disappeared into the ether. He found out about political blogs prior to the 2007 election when he stumbled across Bryan Palmer’s gone, but not forgotten, [i]OzPolitics[/i] blog. He then realised that there were other news sources out there apart from the [i]Courier Mail[/i], commercial television and the ABC and has been commenting on blog and media sites since then. 2353 lives in South East Queensland, has a family, a full-time job, a mortgage, a Bachelor of Business degree and while he likes French cars, he drives a Holden. And he’s asking some challenging questions about political advertising. Enjoy. The [i]TPS[/i] Team

Palaly

30/09/2013I think the polifacts site goes a small way in addressing this situation. However I find that polifacts itself may need monitoring. The increasing presence of social media network also ensures that the situation does not go out of control.

Ad astra

30/09/20132353 What a pleasure it is to welcome you as an author to [i]The Political Sword[/i]. Your piece is well argued and timely. We are already seeing the lack of truth in political advertising as we see a ‘budget emergency’ evaporate before our very eyes, ‘profligate spending’ replicated by the Coalition, as Hockey and Co themselves borrow money. Of course Coalition borrowing will always be better than Labor borrowing. We see the hairy-shirted rhetoric about asylum seekers disappearing behind a curtain of secrecy, and Abbott dismissing boat arrivals as a minor irritant. We see the reality of global warming accepted by Hunt, but no realistic solution offered. And the Coalition’s spruikers only to willing to dismiss their pre-election language as what oppositions do – tell lies to get themselves into office. It would be gratifying if we the voters could have truth in political advertising, and lies penalized like they are in the commercial world, but that is likely to be a long time coming! Again, 2353 thank you for an excellent article. Please return to delight us again.

Ad astra

30/09/2013Folks What a delightful session tonight on ABC 24 when Anne Summers interviewed Julia Gillard, who then answered questions from the audience. The overwhelming feeling she generated was: ‘What have we lost?” And what have we got in her place???? For those who missed it, it will be repeated on ABC1 tomorrow at 11 am.

Janet (j4gypsy)

30/09/2013Hi Palaly, not sure if this is your first time here, but 'Welcome':-)if it is. You raise a very interesting point about the political fact-checking enterprises. To some extent they are, indeed, trying to address the blatancy we've seen in mis- and disinforming by politicians. How successful they've been is not really clear yet, I suspect.

DoodlePoodle

30/09/2013[quote]The overwhelming feeling she generated was: ‘What have we lost?” And what have we got in her place????[/quote] This was my comment to those watching the programme with me. The response was - Can you imagine Abbott sitting up there taking questions - with his Safety Vest and Hard Hat - saying um um ahh ahh!! 2353 well written and thoughtful article.

DMW

30/09/2013Hey 2353 well done. Them wot writes the rules get to break the rules is at the heart of the 'problem'. As a side issue to the truth in political advertising notion we also have exemptions that politicians enjoy. Political organisations can call people on the Do Not Call Register, they can 'dump' their junk mail in letterboxes that have a No Advertising Material or similar sign, have unfettered access to the electoral roll and other privileges denied us as individuals allegedly to, among other things, 'protect our privacy'. There are other challenges. If we really had truth in political advertising it could easily become even more dull, colourless and boring than even the recent election campaigns. More importantly what would we have to discuss here? Ok, I'm sure we tragics would find something to rattle on about but would we have us much fun?

Casablanca

1/10/2013 CASABLANCA'S CACHE for Tuesday, 1 October 2013 [u][b]POLITICS[/b][/u] [b] 1. The politics of brinksmanship: Abbott heads to Indonesia [/b] Adrian Vickers Running foreign policy on domestic agendas is always risky business. Indonesia made its position on refugee boats clear in the lead-up to Australia’s election. https://theconversation.com/the-politics-of-brinksmanship-abbott-heads-to-indonesia-18692?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+30+September+2013&utm_content=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+30+September+2013+CID_4344ace54bb4ebf448f6bb147c019b9b&utm_source=campaign_monitor&utm_term=writes%20Adrian%20Vickers [b] 2. Tensions run as high as the stakes in Indonesia[/b] Michael Bachelard The Prime Minister began his first overseas trip as Prime Minister yesterday afternoon, and the stakes could barely be higher. Mr Natalegawa has been adamant since March 2010, when Mr Abbott first announced his boat tow-back policy, that it was unacceptable, and his opposition is only growing, on the basis that it offends Indonesian sovereignty. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/tensions-run-as-high-as-the-stakes-in-indonesia-20130930-2uom6.html [b] 3. War and peace: Australia’s enormous September at the UN [/b] John Langmore September 2013 has been an extraordinary month for Australia to chair the UN Security Council. A month that began with threats of a new war in Syria is ending with substantial steps towards peace in three areas of conflict. It has been a truly astonishing period, and one I have witnessed first hand from New York. http://theconversation.com/war-and-peace-australias-enormous-september-at-the-un-18719 [b] 4. Before a Fall[/b] Andrew Elder This story will probably not lead to the downfall of two Cabinet ministers straight away. It does, however, give an insight into those ministers, and the sorts of inherent weaknesses that might well* lead to their downfall. That article also shows what's wrong with the way politics is reported, particularly by Fairfax http://andrewelder.blogspot.com.au/ [b] 5. Acting opposition leader Chris Bowen lashes Attorney-General George Brandis as 'a hypocrite'[/b] Jonathan Swan, Jacqueline Maley Attorney-General George Brandis is one of Parliament's "biggest hypocrites" for acting as a watchdog on parliamentary standards while claiming taxpayer funds to attend a friend's wedding, says acting opposition leader Chris Bowen http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/acting-opposition-leader-chris-bowen-lashes-attorneygeneral-george-brandis-as-a-hypocrite-20130930-2un4d.html [b] 6. The Brandis Canon[/b] Stephen Murray Over the past four years, taxpapyers have helped underwrite the cost of George Brandis’ wide ranging tastes in newspapers, periodicals and books to the tune of over $12, 000, with several thousands of dollars potentially spent on subjects previously questioned by the Australian National Audit Office as ”at risk of being outside the scope of the entitlement”. http://boilermakerbill.wordpress.com/2013/09/29/the-brandis-canon/ [b] 7. Abbott should stay firm on China reform[/b] John Garnaut When Tony Abbott arrived for his first trip to Beijing as Opposition Leader in July last year, he injected values and human rights into the Coalition's China relationship, where previously they had not featured. He visited a state-sanctioned Catholic church, and was deeply moved by the experience. He spoke publicly in unusually strident terms. ''As prime minister, I would hope for political reform to match China's economic liberalisation,'' he said. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/abbott-should-stay-firm-on-china-reform-20130930-2uomg.html#ixzz2gOjFwl47 [b] 8. The Lynton Crosby effect: dog whistles and jewellery jokes[/b] Nicholas Watt, Tory strategist has the complete confidence of Downing Street, despite months of critical publicity http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2013/sep/29/lynton-crosby [b] 9. The last boomer PM[/b] Matt Holden The shape of political discourse in Australia since the late 1960s has followed the contours of the boomers’ demographic bulge, and under the surface the flows of economic and social power has mapped their trajectory through the world in other ways. http://overland.org.au/2013/09/the-last-boomer-pm/ [b] 10. How to lose a culture war: a response to Ben Eltham[/b] Jeff Sparrow Abbott’s a cultural warrior, born and bred; his most enthusiastic supporters sup daily from a wingnut blogosphere that has honed baiting liberals into an art form. In any case, as I’ve argued elsewhere, the Coalition took power without either a mandate or a clear program, and so need an immediate symbolic battle to hold their fractious army together. http://overland.org.au/2013/09/how-to-lose-a-culture-war-a-response-to-ben-eltham/ [u][b]ASYLUM SEEKERS [/b][/u] [b] 11. Asylum seeker problem won't quietly go away[/b] Paul Karp As the Federal Government has learned, if it chooses not to speak about asylum seekers, plenty of others will step in to fill the void. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-30/karp-asylum-seeker-problem-wont-quietly-go-away/4989190 [b] 12. Tony Abbott holds 'frank' people-smuggling discussions with Indonesia[/b] theguardian.com, Australian PM declares 'total respect for Indonesia's sovereignty' after Jakarta talks with President Yudhoyono http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/30/tony-abbott-people-smuggling-indonesia [u][b]CLIMATE CHANGE[/b][/u] [b] 13. For scientists in a democracy, to dissent is to be reasonable[/b] George Monbiot Government policy in Britain, Canada and Australia is crushing academic integrity on behalf of corporate power. These governments have suppressed or misrepresented inconvenient findings on climate change, pollution, pesticides, fisheries and wildlife. They have shut down programmes that produce unwelcome findings and sought to muzzle scientists. This is a modern version of Soviet Lysenkoism: crushing academic dissent on behalf of bad science and corporate power. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/30/scientists-democracy-dissent-reasonable-boyd [b] 14. Lomborg’s criticism of current renewables is years out of date [/b] Andrew Blakers The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Report paints an authoritative picture of the dire consequences if we fail to rapidly curb our greenhouse gas emissions. Solving this will require many different actions in parallel: to curb energy demand, reduce the greenhouse intensity of electricity production, shift transport to renewable electricity and renewable fuels, move heavy industry away from fossil fuel, curb land clearing, and reduce the greenhouse intensity of agriculture. http://theconversation.com/lomborgs-criticism-of-current-renewables-is-years-out-of-date-18744 [u][b]NDIS[/b][/u] [b] 15. National disability insurance scheme has priced some services 'much too low'[/b] Bridie Jabour Chief executive says service providers will not be financially sustainable if the budgeted rates are not increased. http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/sep/30/disability-insurance-scheme-prices-low?CMP=soc_568 [b]*J*U*L*I*A*[/b] [b] 16. Julia Gillard's Q&A at Sydney Opera House – as it happened[/b] Bridie Jabour In her first extended interview since losing the prime ministership Julia Gillard is talking to Anne Summers in a question and answer session at the Opera House [b] 17. Gillard gets a hero’s welcome as the party marches on[/b] Michelle Grattan Gillard, just back from the United States, who walked on stage to the song “Respect” used the occasion to announce that she will be a senior fellow at Washington’s prestigious Brookings Institution think tank, working on global education. This is in addition to her honorary visiting professorship at Adelaide University. http://theconversation.com/gillard-gets-a-heros-welcome-as-the-party-marches-on-18775 [b] 18. Julia Gillard explains 'misogyny speech'[/b] Gabrielle Chan “The speech was a crack point,” Gillard said. “I thought after everything I have experienced, I have to listen to Tony Abbott lecture me about sexism. “That gave me the emotional start to the speech and once I started, it took on a life of its own.” http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/30/julia-gillard-explains-misogyny-speech?CMP=soc_568 [u][b]TODAY’S MAIN NEWS [/b][/u] [b] • ROULE REPORT — Issues of Today[/b] http://paper.li/RouleReport/1334728962 [b] • REAL-TIME NEWS[/b] Margo Kingston The Tweeted Times aggregates news in your Twitter stream and ranks them by popularity among your friends. Never miss any important news! The Tweeted Times is a real-time personalized newspaper generated from your Twitter account. The Tweeted Times rebuilds your newspaper hourly, and is always up-to-date http://tweetedtimes.com/#!/margokingston1 [b] • ASHBYGATE[/b] http://tweetedtimes.com/#!/search/AshbyGate/en [b] • AN EYE ON ABC NEWS: [/b]. Keeping the bastards who keep the bastards honest, honest http://www.abcnewswatch.blogspot.com.au/ [b] • AUSTRALIAN NEWSPAPER FRONT PAGES[/b] www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm [b] • NEWS HEADLINES [/b] http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

TalkTurkey

1/10/2013 2353 Respect and felicitations for leading the discussion on this august publication. I agree in principle, but I must also agree with Ad's comment, it'll be a while coming. As *Palaly* says, (welcome Palaly!) the social media network is a big factor now, but as the election shows us with pain, the Fighting 5th is not yet adequate to withstand the combined might of the shockjocks and the billionaires and the Murdoch media AND [i]Their[/i] ABC (and of course, the most unkindest cut of all, always and all the time, bloody [i]RUDD[/i].) Most of all though, of course, MURDOCH. [i]And they will not change of themselves[/i]. Tories, RWers, Fascists, Tea-partiers - they are all the same, they self-generate, and they are hateful. We must fight them on EVERY level, ALL the time, until Australians attain a level of social and educational sophistication that will make it impossible for their kind to prosper. And then to keep our heel on their throat, as they purpose to do to ours. The best thing to do about Them is to fuse all our pens in The Sword, liaise and interconnect with all the others socially aware sites, help to grow the 5th Estate, and make our voices heard - as Yes, the People did at the Summers/Gillard interview last night. HOW COME it was booked out in a flash? Why, Social Media! Did you ever see anything like the audience response? Abborrrtt and his minions face a bitter blizzard of vituperation forever now: the adoration of *J*U*L*I*A* is the exact inverse of the loathing so many now feel for Abborrrtt himself. Dog alone knows what the future holds now - my Eye of Time was blinded by Rudd's rolling of her, - Timesight cannot penetrate deliberate deception such as Rudd's! - and sight in it has only started to return, blurrily. But even Blind Turkey can see that Labor is the only force that can govern for the People; it's not perfect, no, granted ... so Comrades if you're not in the ALP Please Join, all it needs to be better is YOU! And for now, those of us who are Members, by today you have your voting papers - well I'm voting Albo, I'm not about to slag off Bill Shorten but to me Albanese seems much the more dependable - Labor has been his life, and you know what he said (through noble tears from his torn loyalties), "I like fighting Tories, it's what I do!"

TalkTurkey

1/10/2013 ALP Members ... before you vote ... This link is worth the trip especially for the picture of Albo with *J*U*L*I*A*, laughing their faces off. (Gee she's lovely!) http://www.news.com.au/national-news/federal-election/stylists-say-new-deputy-prime-minister-anthony-albanese-has-undergone-makeover/story-fnho52ip-1226675624668 Now Comrades I'm taking the unusual step of posting an entire speech to the Media last year, a speech which seems to me to explain pretty much why he's got my vote. It's just one speech but I warn you it's quite BIG. Goes to show how much a leading Labor Fed pollie has to speak.(And [i]speaking[/i] is the very [i]EASY[/i] part!) I've bolded a few bits I think significant. Here goes: Anthony Albanese MP, Federal Member for Grayndler Deputy Prime Minister Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy Leader of the House Leader of the House Interview Transcripts [b]Feb 25, 2012[/b] Transcript of Press Conference – Sydney [b]ISSUES: Labor leadership[/b] ANTHONY ALBANESE: Thank you for joining us. I intend to make a statement. I will then take a limited number of questions and to save media outlets some phone calls over coming days, these will be my only public comments before the ballot on Monday. [b]I love the Labor Party.[/b] [b]I was raised by a single mum and I was told that you always had to stand up for what you believed in, regardless of the odds.[/b] I hope that when I leave politics people will regard me as a straightforward politician who said what he thought, who acted in the interest of the Labor Party. Not because that was an end in itself, but because it is only the Australian Labor Party that can advance the long-term national interests of this country. Mum raised me with three great faiths: [b]the Catholic Church, the South Sydney football club and Labor. She said to be true to all three. Well, with regard to the Catholic Church, I believe that the social justice values that I was raised with, I have kept. With regard to South Sydney, in spite of 41 years of constant disappointment, I have remained faithful. I have also remained faithful to the Labor Party. I have devoted my life to advancing the cause of Labor.[/b] I have despaired in recent days as I have watched Labor’s legacy in government be devalued. We have been a good government since 2007. [b]Under Kevin Rudd[/b], we had the apology. We brought the troops home from Iraq. We ratified the Kyoto Protocol. We advanced the National Broadband Network. In my portfolio, we established Infrastructure Australia, we doubled the roads budget. We increased the rail budget by more than 10 times. We committed more to urban public transport than all governments combined since federation. We have been a good government since 2007. Under Prime Minister Rudd we advanced a great deal. Most importantly, we got through the Global Financial Crisis better than any economy anywhere in the world. We should be proud of our record and not undermine it. [b]Under Prime Minister Gillard[/b], she has led a government that has achieved [b]outstanding things[/b], particularly under the circumstances of minority government. Two hundred and sixty-nine pieces of legislation. Finally we have a price on carbon; we have structural separation of Telstra; the Minerals Resource Rent Tax and just in the last fortnight, reform of private health insurance. Making sure that my private health insurance isn’t subsidised by working people in my electorate. And, of course, the ABCC legislation to get rid of that unfairness in the workplace. I believe we’ve been a good government since 2007 and it’s incumbent upon members of the Caucus to advance that – each and every one of us. Over recent days I’ve had a difficult decision to make. I’ve consulted friends, colleagues, branch members. Members of the community have come up to me, have written to me, have rung me. Yesterday in my electorate office I rang a number of constituents who’d emailed me cold – people who had given particularly thoughtful contributions – just to have a chat about their thoughts on these issues because at the end of the day while it’s a decision for the Caucus, it’s also a decision for the nation. Last night upon talking to family, I came to a decision. I rang the Prime Minister this morning and had a lengthy conversation with her. I informed the Prime Minister that I would be voting for Kevin Rudd in Monday’s ballot. I went through the reasons why and, given my position as Leader of the House, I also offered my resignation to her. As Leader of the House, in particular, I think it’s a different circumstance to which other ministers find themselves in. We had a good constructive discussion. [b]She thanked me for the way that I had conducted myself and expressed confidence that I should remain as Leader of the House due to the loyalty that I had shown, the tenacity that I had shown in that position and said that I would continue to be able to have her confidence – her full confidence – if she was successful in Monday’s ballot.[/b] In recent times, I’ve argued against the predicament that the party now finds itself in. I’ve argued against the spill. I’ve argued against those people who argued we should ‘bring it on’, as it were called, whether they be forces inside or outside the Labor Caucus. I also argued against a challenge against the Prime Minister and indicated that I would not support any challenge against the Prime Minister, should someone seek to bring it on. I believe that the last few days have done damage to our party – there’s no doubt about that. I have argued against this sort of action before, on the night of 23 June 2010. I believe the Government’s difficulties can be traced to that night. Labor is the party of fairness. It was not fair. It was wrong. We cannot have a situation whereby a first-term elected Prime Minister is deposed, without warning, under the circumstances in which it was done, and I think that anyone who analyses those circumstances objectively would agree with that regardless of the personalities involved. We’ve only had three leaders lead us from opposition into government since the Second World War: Kevin Rudd, Bob Hawke and Gough Whitlam. Each of those three gentlemen deserved our respect. That’s important. Each of those three gentlemen were formidable campaigners indeed. It is tough. It is tough to take Labor from opposition to government. Kevin Rudd showed in 2007 that he could do that. I argued that night to Kevin Rudd that he shouldn’t contest the ballot because it was in the interests of the party that we get a clean change, given that the circumstances were that he would not have been successful had he contested, and given the proximity to a federal election. That was a difficult thing to do. Monday’s ballot is the only opportunity I have, therefore, in a ballot to express my dissent from the actions of that night. And I intend to do so. I do so with a heavy heart. In politics, as in life, you cannot just consider the past; you have to also look to the future and I also believe that our future prospects would be stronger with Kevin Rudd as leader. We need to win in 2013 to entrench our reforms. We’ve had, under both Prime Ministers Gillard and Rudd, a big agenda. But in order to entrench the reforms that are there, the equity changes that we’re making in education, in health, in my area of infrastructure, you need a long period of time in order to achieve change. All of that, all of that is at risk. All of that is at risk if Tony Abbott becomes Prime Minister. Can I conclude with this: that I have made my decision and it has not been an easy decision. I respect those who disagree with me. It is a judgement call. Both Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard are formidable politicians and good human beings with good hearts and smart heads. They are formidable people, both of them, and both of them have my utmost respect. Can I say this also: that no one has fought the Government’s critics harder than myself. Day in, day out, in the Parliament, on the floor of the House of Representatives, in Question Time, in suspension motions, outside of Question Time in the public. [b]When a convoy of very hostile people came to have a demo outside my office, I fronted up. Months ago I said we had to front up to our critics and take them on.[/b] I’ve seen a lot of passion over the last few days from members of the Australian Labor Party. What I want after Monday morning is for that passion to be channelled, regardless of the outcome, into defeating Tony Abbott at the next election. Unless we do that and move forward, we will deliver a Government to someone who – I disagree here with Kevin Rudd, who said he was the most conservative leader that the Liberal Party have had. He’s not a conservative. He is a reactionary. He is a reactionary who has modelled himself on the far right of US politics, and we’re seeing some of that played out at the moment. I won’t make any further comment after this. So now is your chance if journalists have any questions. QUESTION: Why have you gone against of the majority of the ministry to support a leader who is so unpopular internally? ANTHONY ALBANESE: We’ll wait and see the outcome of the ballot on Monday. I don’t pre-empt what Caucus members do. But let me say this: I have not taken this decision in any opportunistic fashion. I think that most people who have observed what’s going on in recent days would have to acknowledge that this is a tough call for me to make. This is not the easy option. This is certainly not in my personal political interest. I am doing it because it’s right. QUESTION: If Kevin Rudd loses the ballot, what ramifications do you expect there to be for you in the new Cabinet? ANTHONY ALBANESE: None at all. I have had a good discussion with the Prime Minister this morning. I rang her first. We have obviously spoken at other times in recent days but I rang her to inform her of my decision. I then rang Wayne Swan and told him and had a discussion with him. Then I told Kevin Rudd. I’m old fashioned. I tell people who I’m not voting for them first. I think that what happens in a process like this – and this is a very important process in terms of restoring Caucus processes –people should go along, they should vote whatever way they themselves think and people should then respect the decision. The problem with what occurred in June 2010 was that no one had the time to consider the circumstances, to make a reasoned decision. No one, not just inside the caucus but outside the Caucus as well, which is why there was such a reaction to it. My view, and I’ve spoken to Kevin Rudd. He has indicated that if he is not successful, he will not challenge again. He will go the back bench. Julia Gillard has said the same thing. QUESTION: Do you think your decision could influence other ministers to change their vote for Kevin Rudd? ANTHONY ALBANESE: I’m not lobbying for anyone. Indeed to be frank my preferred position, and we should have a discussion about this in the fullness of time, is that we’ve got to get real about the amount of TV and internal discussions which take place during one of these processes. It is my preferred position to go into the Caucus and cast a secret vote in a secret ballot. However, given that every single minister has done stand-up TV interviews, I was of the view – and it was suggested to me that I didn’t have to do this press conference, not by the Prime Minister, she respected my views – but some of my closest friends suggested that. I was of the view, given that every single person was out there stating their position, that for me and the sort of politician I am, to not go public with my position now that I have determined what it would be, is not what my electorate would want and not what my branch members would want. I fully understand that there are those who will disagree with my position, particularly some people in the electorate. I say this to them: this is not the easy option. All the indications are that Julia Gillard will be successful in Monday’s ballot. The easy thing to do, and what often happens in these ballots is that people like to go with the big group, not the small group and maybe just because I’m from the New South Wales Left – by definition, that is something that doesn’t worry me at all. I have thought really genuinely and seriously about this. And there are no hidden agendas. You won’t hear any criticism of Julia Gillard or Kevin Rudd from me because I think they have both been outstanding Labor Prime Ministers. QUESTION: You’ve been very emotional here today. What sort of personal toll has this taken on you? ANTHONY ALBANESE: Well this is tough. I like fighting Tories. That’s what I do. That’s what I do. And I have lifelong friends who disagree with me on this. It has been very difficult. I knew that if I came to this position I had to be in the position of being comfortable with offering my resignation to the Prime Minister as the Leader of the House. That was the position I came to and it’s a big call. Those people who watch Question Time might notice that I quite like being Leader of the House and, what’s more, I think I’m good at it. I think I’m good at it and I serve the government well. I was pleased that under the circumstances, and I made it clear to the Prime Minister, that it would be perfectly reasonable for her that, under the circumstances where I indicated I was going to make my position public, she accept that resignation. She refused to on the basis that she had absolute confidence that I would continue, were she to continue as Prime Minister to hold her confidence that I would serve her loyally, as I have. As I have each and every day. I remind people that after the ballot, well, the non-ballot or the change of Prime Minister on that Thursday, I ran Question Time. I did it while those processes were going on, on that Thursday. But it is difficult. The truth is it has been very traumatic. I would just simply rather have arguments with those people who I disagree with so strongly. We have a good record. We have a good record in government. We have a good story to tell. We need to tell the story. We need to take on our conservative critics, at each and every level, inside the Parliament and outside the Parliament. That is the basis for why this has been difficult. I’m not singling myself out. This has been difficult for everyone and most difficult for Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd and their families. QUESTION: Have you spoken to Kevin Rudd today at all? ANTHONY ALBANESE: I have. QUESTION: And what did you say? ANTHONY ALBANESE: I told him that I had rung the Prime Minister and that I’d be voting for him on Monday. QUESTION: What was his response to that? ANTHONY ALBANESE: He thanked me for my support and that was it. It wasn’t a very long conversation. You tend to not need to have as long conversations with people who you are telling that you are voting for them as you do with people who you are telling that you’re not voting for them. QUESTION: You know by going public with your decision you will influence others. How many others do you think? ANTHONY ALBANESE: This isn’t aimed at influencing anyone. This is aimed at indicating clearly, transparently, what my position is. QUESTION: Did you ask the Prime Minister not to stand in the ballot? ANTHONY ALBANESE: It’s not up to me to do that. QUESTION: [Inaudible]…nature of the feedback from your electorate… [Inaudible]? ANTHONY ALBANESE: Look, some of those remain confidential obviously. In general, there was a consistency with the position that I’ve taken. I mean people can see the polls in today’s paper. There is no reason to suggest, I know there’s this great science always about internal polling. Guess what? It’s a scam made up by political apparatchiks such as me to pretend that we know more than you do. You know, read the paper. It’s there but certainly not uniform. There are some people in my electorate who will strongly disagree with my position. QUESTION: [Inaudible]…is this the first time you’re voting against the leader…[Inaudible]? ANTHONY ALBANESE: I’m trying to think. I’ve been through a few, a few too many, but I don’t have a great record of backing winning candidates. So, if you go back and look at who’s been defeated, chances are I voted for them. QUESTION: How do you respond to… ANTHONY ALBANESE: I supported Kim Beazley against Kevin Rudd for example very openly and I supported Kevin Rudd against, when Julia Gillard challenged him in 2010. [b]My general view is that it’s incumbent to back leaders – that’s my gut instinct. But these are circumstances which are pretty unique.[/b] You essentially have two former prime ministers. Had the circumstances arisen whereby Kevin Rudd announced that he was challenging the Prime Minister, then I would not have taken the position that I have. Kevin’s position was made pretty difficult I think. My view is that this shouldn’t have happened. My view was the Prime Minister was doing her job; the Foreign Minister was doing his job. It is other people’s interventions that caused this to be brought to a head and I don’t think it was inevitable as much as the media tried to talk it up because it gives you something to talk about for all these days. But I don’t think it was inevitable. That was my strong view and that was conveyed to anyone who would listen. QUESTION: How do you think the numbers are going? ANTHONY ALBANESE: I’m not counting numbers. QUESTION: You’re not doing anything [indistinct]? ANTHONY ALBANESE: I am not counting, I am not counting numbers. I am not doing that. People will find out on Monday. Once again, there are various things in the papers and stuff. [b]Can I say this about the various lists and, I’ve been on all of them in different positions. There isn’t a single journalist who I have spoken to about what way I’m voting. The person who heard that I was voting the way that I was first was the Prime Minister. That was this morning and that was appropriate.[/b] Thanks very much.

Casablanca

1/10/2013[b]*J*U*L*I*A* IN MELBOURNE TONIGHT[/b] Sky will be televising the Anne Summers' Conversation with Julia from Melbourne tonight. #juliamelb The Sydney Show was replayed last night at 11.30ish and it will be repeated again this morning at 11am on Big Ideas ABC1. #juliasyd Don't know if the ABC will record the Melbourne Show for later playing.

2353~

1/10/2013Palay - thanks for your comment and welcome (as I can't remember you posting before either). True the Polifact sites are trying place some fences around the claims made in political advertising - while the ABC's Fact Check Unit does get some reporting on line, the others don't really seem to be picked up by the 4th estate which is where a lot of people still get all their current affairs information. The reason could be that a concept as complex as looking at a range of facts and the determination of if the claim is truthful or not takes too long for the "format" of electronic media. AA - Thank you for the welcome as an author. We all have large shoes to fill in keeping TPS up to your standard. Janet - Thanks for the comment (and "management" ;-) so far). Doodle Poodle - Thanks for the comment DMW - Wow, I didn't even think of those other "exemptions" but you are correct, politicians do seem to exempt themselves a bit. The alternative to dull and colourless advertising is to actually give us a reason to vote for them - explain how the policies will work and what they actually intend to do. I'm sure I'm not the only one that is slightly "creeped out" by media reports that Abbott's Government is now working out how they will implement their stated policies! Surely that should have been explained to us mug punters before we put a "1" in the box early in September. TT - Thanks for the comment and support. I haven't caught up with the Gillard interview yet but it sounds interesting. If I was a ALP member I would probably also be voting the same way as you for the next leader. And last but not least, thanks Casablanca for another comprehensive list of links to investigate today.

Michael

1/10/2013Creepy Abbott delivers pious rhetoric in Jakarta. Indonesians are committed to politeness and manners, but they recognise unctuousness a mile away. It actually disgusts them. Abbott's just sold himself as easy meat. A Javanese schoolkid could outplay him... if they could be bothered. This story by Andrew Bolt http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinion/tony-abbott-scores-his-first-big-win-over-boats/story-fni0ffxg-1226729517704 is arrant BS. This one about Barnaby Joyce and Michael Smith's wedding http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/barnaby-joyce-to-pay-up-for-comcar-used-for-radio-host-michael-smith8217s-wedding/story-fnhnv0wb-1226730056386 has Peta Credlin all over it. The wedding was two years ago. That's a lot of time since, let alone before, for a manner of behaviour to have occurred many other times. May the whistles blow!

jaycee

1/10/2013While being aware that a national leader must sometimes have to hold different positions on policy re domestic / foreign affairs, I would have thought Mr. Abbott's position before the Indonesians "on bended knees" was a tad "different" and unusual...but then again, I suppose those years of practice in the seminary, genuflecting before and "kissing the archbishop's ring" has held him in good stead for everyday Liberal Party proceedure with foreign powers.....after all, such has been the "position" with all the self-proclaimed "great " Liberal leaders..ie. ; Menzies to the British monarchy, Howard to the American president...and..and..oh!..is that all of them?...oh!...anyway, when crawling to such low levels is seen by the right-wing cognisenti as "achieving greatness" I guess the lowest recorded success with the Limbo Stick would appeal to them like a high-jump!..and if longevity in place is the best they can claim, then that puts them indeed ahead of some benign tumors, but only in time, and not beauty!

TalkTurkey

1/10/2013Come on all you Lefties Get your chins up off the floor If an election were held today We'd bloody win for sure! Abborrtt's mob is floundering They haven't got a clue The game is Up now that they're In Let's face the future with a grin Fight on Comrades till we win We bloody [i]will[/i] win too!

TalkTurkey

1/10/2013"Creepy Abbott delivers pious rhetoric in Jakarta." Great line Michael, I'm'a put it on Twitter! :)

Ken

1/10/2013I seem to recall there was a decision somewhere (by a regulatory authority or perhaps even a court) that did make the point that people (the legal "reasonable person") did make a distinction between political rhetoric and genuine truth. (If anybody can find that it would be helpful!) I have no doubt that it would be better for all if politicians were held to the same "truth in advertising" standards as commercial concerns but that is unlikely to happen in my lifetime!!! The associated issue is that, even when they tell the "truth", it is usually not the whole truth, and it is spun to suit their needs. Probably can't completely overcome that one but ensuring that more facts are available to the voters would certainly help. to 2353 - "good one, mate"

Michael

1/10/2013Abbott has, well, quelle effing surprise, demonstrated his military fetish again. In the following article, which is riven with schizoid internal contradictions, by the by, Abbott calls the 20 'leading' businessmen (who paid their tickets, by the way?) (and, are they all men?? - well, since he christened them the "Admirals of Industry, probably) - but, FFS, "Admirals of Industry"??!! This bloke's still in the sandpit! http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/more-needed-to-encourage-live-cattle-trade-from-australia-to-indonesia-tony-abbott-20131001-2uq6g.html

Michael

1/10/2013And here: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/tony-abbott-appears-to-waver-on-key-parts-of-his-contentious-asylum-seeker-policy-20131001-2uq0k.html Abbott the Iron Man (if rust counts) does his stand-up comedy routine, affectionately entitled in any one of its fifteen or more variations, "Oh, that Tony Abbott. Don't know him."

Michael

1/10/2013Libs can't help themselves... well, except when they're helping themselves. Hello Gladys, George, Barnaby, et al. http://www.skynews.com.au/national/article.aspx?id=911053

2353~

1/10/2013Ken - thanks. It would be a vast improvement if politicians could expound on how their policies would work as well as state facts - and that's it - when advertising. It's gotta be possible!

Michael

1/10/2013Apparently, and I know you'll find this hard to believe, but Abbott's Environment Minister Greg Hunt was "misleading" (that is, he lied) about the impact of the carbon price. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-01/greg-hunt-carbon-emissions-misleading/4989750

woodypear

1/10/2013Why can't there be some sort of punitive punishment for politicians who engage in loose or misleading statements? In sport they have a referee who picks up on misdemeanors and awards penalties. Surely the same could apply to our politicians. They are engaging in a form of cheating and need to be pulled up for it and be penalized. I don't know how it could work but I'm sure a fair system could be achieved.

Casablanca

2/10/2013 [u][b]CASABLANCA'S CACHE[/b][/u] for Wednesday, 2 October 2013 [u][b]IDEAS & CHALLENGES[/b][/u] [b] 1. Let’s treat the social causes of illness rather than just disease [/b] Fiona Stanley. Fiona Stanley is the director of this year’s Melbourne Festival of Ideas: The Art and Science of Wellbeing, which opens today and continues until October 6, 2013. Here she explains the ethos behind the… http://theconversation.com/lets-treat-the-social-causes-of-illness-rather-than-just-disease-18276 [b] 2. An age-old problem: society fails to truly embrace its seniors[/b] Rhonda Nay We need to see old age as success and value older people as expressions of this accomplishment. Cockroaches in the kitchen, kerosene in the bath, abuse and malnutrition – these are the aged-care stories that often make headlines. What we have is a societal problem. http://theconversation.com/an-age-old-problem-society-fails-to-truly-embrace-its-seniors-16299 [b] 3. Social Media and Public Policy What is the Evidence? [/b] (40 pages) This report considers whether social media data can improve the quality and timeliness of the evidence base that informs public policy. Can the myriad of human connections and interactions on the web provide insight to enable government to develop better policy, understand its subsequent impact and inform the many different organisations that deliver public services? http://www.alliance4usefulevidence.org/assets/Social-Media-and-Public-Policy.pdf [b] 4. Quack Policy: Abusing Science in the Cause of Paternalism[/b] (76 pages) Jamie Whyte State regulation has become pervasive in Western economies. Across different sectors, economic activity is tightly constrained by government rules. The scope for entrepreneurship and innovation is severely limited, with negative implications for both liberty and the creation of wealth http://www.iea.org.uk/sites/default/files/in-the-media/files/IEA%20Quack%20Policy.pdf [b] 5. Zinc link to neurodegenerative disorders Zinc, proteins, and an essential cellular balancing act[/b] David Tenenbaum A zinc shortage in cells decreases protein stability, leading proteins to lose their shape, stop working and clump together – and may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. http://phys.org/news/2013-09-zinc-proteins-essential-cellular.html [b] 6. Equipping students for moral argument[/b] Frank Brennan ... to provide genuinely sound counsel to future clients.' If corporate law professors have a role in explaining human motivation beyond self-interest and in developing a broad understanding of the corporation's social role, that presumably is because all law teachers have a role in developing a broad understanding, or at least discussion, of the social role of the State, community groups and individuals. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38280#.UkqSN7e19ZY [b] 7. TWEET: Whit Goughlam ‏@leftocentre Ms Gillard considered the Prime Ministership as a privilege & honour. Mr Abbott considers it his divine right. #juliamelb[/b] [b] 8. Gender equality? Not here…[/b] AMINA KEYGAN His message was loud and clear (and some might add chauvinistic): women have well and truly won the gender war. The glass ceiling no longer exists. Women dominate. And men have taken to wearing skirts to job interviews. http://www.theadvocate.com.au/story/1810089/opinion-gender-equality-not-here/?cs=86 [b] 9. Where does Tony Abbott's political DNA come from? [/b] Paul Rogerson Whose child is Tony Abbott? Bronny and Johnny? Or Fraser and Santamaria? (AAP/ABC) Does Tony Abbott's political pedigree owe more to Bronwyn Bishop and John Howard - or is he Malcolm Fraser and BA Santamaria's ideological love child. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-01/rogerson-tony-abbott27s-political-heritage/4991562?WT.mc_id=newsmail [u][b]GENDER EQUALITY[/b][/u] [b] 10. TWEET: Jane Tribune ‏@JaneTribune 28m JG nominated "women and girls in warfare" as Aus topic for presidency of Security Council. Our new PM for Women said No. [/b] [b] 11. A funny thing happened on the way to Question Time [/b] Miranda McInerney 31 October 2012 Instead of the usual Question Time circus, however, what unfolded before us over the next two and a half hours on Tuesday 09 October, 2012, was an extraordinary demonstration of political machinations and quite heartfelt personal outbursts — from both sides. [b] 12. The Gillard effect: A role model we are lucky to have[/b] Catherine Fox When Julia Gillard made her farewell speech on the night of 26 June this year and declared she was "absolutely confident it would be easier for the next woman (Prime Minister) and the woman after that and the woman after that", I simply wasn't convinced. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/opinions/the-gillard-effect-a-role-model-we-are-lucky-to-have/201310012976?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=db30d8ec29-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_09_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-db30d8ec29-30634093 [b] 13. Julia Gillard's message to young women: The benefits of a political career outweigh the burdens[/b] Michelle Grattan, Asked to answer those who said Rudd had just done to her what she earlier did to him, she said: “To ask your leader to have a leadership ballot – that’s legitimate. To do things continuously that undermine the Labor party and the Labor government, then of course that shouldn’t be done by anyone… The key difference is every day I was deputy PM I spent all of my time doing everything I could to have the Labor government prosper.” http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/top-stories/julia-gillard-s-message-to-young-women-the-benefits-of-a-political-career-outweigh-the-burdens/201309302971?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=db30d8ec29-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_09_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-db30d8ec29-30634093 [b] 14. 7 things Australia's new Minister for Women should be thinking about right now[/b] Marina Go Tony Abbott made it clear during the election that Team Abbott would be a government that offers real change. So with that in mind it's important we remind him – constantly - of the changes we would like to see him deliver as Minister for Women. http://az307127.vo.msecnd.net/webslices/ie8?culture=en-us&r=asdf9488 [b] 15. Family business sector lags corporate sector in utilising female talent[/b] Briana Everett The boards of family businesses are missing out on an important talent pool, with two thirds holding less than 30% females. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/top-stories/family-business-sector-lags-corporate-sector-in-utilising-female-talent/201309302972?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=db30d8ec29-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_09_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-db30d8ec29-30634093 [b] 16. The top 16 competencies of great leaders (and how women lead the way) [/b] Marina Go I met a man recently who offered me great hope for future female leadership. I was referred to him by a female director of an ASX company. She described him as someone who truly understood the value of board diversity and the important role that talented women could play in the success of major corporations. mensagenda.com.au/talking-about/the-daily-juggle/the-top-16-competencies-of-great-leaders-and-how-women-lead-the-way/201309292964 [b] 17. A memo to the Minister for Women: no discrimination is legal[/b] Georgina Dent So why do I so often criticise the man who is now our prime minister? Because he has – time and time again – through his words and actions proved himself to be, at best, wholly naive about gender equality in Australia and, at worst, sexist. .. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/editor-s-agenda/a-memo-to-the-minister-for-women-no-discrimination-is-legal/201309302969?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=db30d8ec29-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_09_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-db30d8ec29-30634093 [b] 18. Three tips for talking about gender equality in a social setting[/b] Suzi Skinner Discussing women in leadership, or gender equality in general, in a social setting can be illuminating. If your companions are supporters of the cause the conversation will flow and there is, usually, much for us to learn when this occurs. However, if those in your company are not on the informed side of the ledger, it can be tricky. In that instance it's helpful to know what you can expect so here are a few tips to think about. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/top-stories/three-tips-for-talking-about-gender-equality-in-a-social-setting/201309292966?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=db30d8ec29-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_09_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-db30d8ec29-30634093 [b] 19. How I use humour to manage leadership challenges[/b] Marcia Devlin The recent experiences of Julia Gillard and Sophie Mirabella got me thinking about the way women in leadership roles can be treated and how they manage this treatment. I believe that it's important for women to know about the nasty side of leadership and to be prepared. I shared quite a few examples of how people had tried to thwart my success over the years. I spoke of underhand attacks, rumour-spreading, deliberate exclusion and outright lies told about me. I could see some of the audience was shocked by the anecdotes. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/career-agenda/leaders/how-i-use-humour-to-manage-leadership-challenges/201309302970 [b] 20. What Julia Gillard said[/b] Georgina Dent If you missed it, it's really worth trying to watch it. Whatever your political persuasion it is so refreshing to hear a politician speak without the constraints of spin. And seeing Gillard radiant, dignified and more relaxed than ever before, after what can only be described as a brutal battle in politics, is liberating. If you don't have time to watch it here are some highlights. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/top-stories/what-julia-gillard-said/201310012975 [b] 21. Gillard and Summers: The diplomatic personal touch[/b] Foreign policy realists will wince at this kind of language, because it seems to imply that the personal touch is more important in international affairs than power and national interests. But politicians are persuaders by trade, so Gillard's emphasis should not come as much of a surprise. http://www.lowyinterpreter.org/post/2013/10/01/Gillard-and-Summers-The-diplomatic-personal-touch.aspx [b] 22. Julia Gillard, atonement and a wonderful wave of lady rage[/b] Sarah Macdonald In her first public appearance since being deposed as Prime Minister Julia Gillard was welcomed onto the Opera House stage to the song ‘Respect’. The audience rose to echo by action, those words of Aretha Franklin. Because respect was a sentiment Gillard was rarely shown in office. http://www.dailylife.com.au/news-and-views/dl-opinion/julia-gillard-atonement-and-a-wonderful-wave-of-lady-rage-20131001-2up5v.html [b] 23. Big Ideas [/b] Conversation with Julia Gillard. Video 1hr 17m http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/browse/video_popup.htm?vidURL=/tv/bigideas/stories/2013/09/26/3856772-mediarss-full.xml&vidTitle=Julia%20Gillard%20in%20Conversation%20with%20Anne%20Summers&vidLength=Full [u][b]POLITICS & GOVERNMENT[/b][/u] [b] 24. TWEET: Jane Tribune ‏@JaneTribune 28m JG nominated "women and girls in warfare" as Aus topic for presidency of Security Council. Our new PM for Women said No. [/b] [b] 25. Two Australian Prime Ministers and two attitudes to child abuse in religious organisations. [/b] (i) Prime Minister Julia Gillard's last letter before leaving office on 26 June 2013: (ii) excerpt from the 1997 evidence given by Tony Abbott, when he was Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Employment, Education, Training and Youth Affairs, in support of an alleged paedophile priest later forcefully laicized by the Vatican: http://northcoastvoices.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/two-australian-prime-ministers-and-two.html [b] 26. Bending AusAID or breaking it? [/b] Robin Davies The combined impact of budget cuts and administrative changes to the aid program will be large and unpredictable. September was a harrowing month for Australia's overseas aid program and the agency that manages most of Australia's aid, AusAID. Just before the election, the Coalition announced it would cut $4.5 billion from planned aid spending between now and 2016-17. Then, shortly after taking office, Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced AusAID would be ''integrated'' into the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/bending-ausaid-or-breaking-it-20130929-2um04.html#ixzz2gRjm0yPX [b] 27. The distortion of Abbott's 'women problem'[/b] Susan Harris Rimmer. Tony Abbott has received nothing but bad press from doing exactly what the women's sector asked him to do. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/the-distortion-of-abbotts-women-problem-20130929-2um0b.html#ixzz2gRhhoxmr [b] 28. Feminist outrage too quick off mark[/b] Noel Towell Mr Abbott's government came under sustained fire when he announced that the Office for Women would sit in his own department and the Minister Assisting for Women, Michaelia Cash, would be in the outer ministry. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/feminist-outrage-too-quick-off-mark-20130930-2uowa.html#ixzz2gRi4uXWI [b] 29. A methodical prime minister clears for action[/b] Trish Mercer and John Wanna Abbott's desire to be the 'action man' has created some tensions within his machinery of government. The APS's resilience and capabilities have been stretched by efficiency dividends and other clawback as governments adjust to tighter budgets. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/a-methodical-prime-minister-clears-for-action-20130929-2ulws.html#ixzz2gRilR7sI [b] 30. Tony Abbott says $20 million put aside for buying fishing boats to be used for joint operations instead [/b] News.com.au THE Government has dumped its controversial scheme to spend $20 million buying rickety fishing boats from Indonesian villagers to prevent them being used to transport asylum seekers. The scoffed-at scheme has been sacrificed to the cause of "constructive co-operation'' and a better relationship with the Indonesian leadership on the asylum seeker issue. http://www.news.com.au/national-news/tony-abbott-says-20-million-put-aside-for-buying-fishing-boats-to-be-used-for-joint-operations-instead/story-fncynjr2-1226730947692#ixzz2gTCDKIHO [b] 31. Was Tony Abbott’s Jakarta trip a success? We’ll see[/b] Colin Brown Evaluating the success of Tony Abbott’s first prime ministerial visit to Indonesia depends, of course, on what you saw as its objectives. Those with high hopes – that it would mark a breakthrough in discussions on asylum seeker policies, for instance – were always going to be disappointed. Meetings like these almost never produce big-ticket outcomes. http://theconversation.com/was-tony-abbotts-jakarta-trip-a-success-well-see-18717 [b] 32. New Indonesian studies centre to improve ties with our northern neighbour[/b] Bella Counihan As part of his first trip to Indonesia as prime minister, Tony Abbott yesterday announced the establishment of an Australian Centre for Indonesian Studies to bolster ties between the two countries. The centre will be based at Monash University, but have research “nodes” at the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne and the CSIRO. The government will provide A$15 million to the centre but will have matched funding from partner institutions and the private sector. http://theconversation.com/new-indonesian-studies-centre-to-improve-ties-with-our-northern-neighbour-18783 [b] 33. Why Tony Abbott needs to recognise Indonesia has changed [/b] Krishna Sen September 30 is an important date in Indonesian history. On that day in 1965 the Indonesian military seized power and unleashed a massacre of innocent civilians, killing and incarcerating hundreds of thousands of people. In that context, it was an odd day for a new Australian Prime Minister to visit Indonesia. http://theconversation.com/why-tony-abbott-needs-to-recognise-indonesia-has-changed-18781 [b] 34. Mystery Queen portrait hung in Tony Abbott's HQ[/b] Noel Towell, Judith Ireland "Next they'll be making us curtsey when he comes into the building," one departmental staffer grumbled. Workers at the Department of Prime Minster and Cabinet were surprised to find a portrait of Queen Elizabeth hanging in the staff briefing room. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/mystery-queen-portrait-hung-in-tony-abbotts-hq-20130930-2unp9.html [b] 35. Quiz: How much do you know about Indonesia? [/b] Tony Abbott made his first visit to Indonesia as PM this week. But studies show Australians know very little about their close neighbour. So how do you rate? Take this quiz to find out http://www.theguardian.com/travel/quiz/2013/oct/01/indonesia-quiz [b] 36. Libertarian senator shoots his message in the foot[/b] Grant Wyeth David Leyonhjelm must extricate his libertarian views from a uniquely American gun lust if he is to have any impact on Australian politics. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-01/wyeth-leyonhjelm-shoots-his-message-in-the-foot/4989520 [u][b]BRANDIS; BARNDANCING; BOOKS; and BULLSH*T[/b][/u] [b] 37. Attending a wedding? It's a job for a master diplomat[/b] Ben Pobjie Radio personality Mike Smith found out that two senators considered his wedding a work expense. Harsh, but weddings really are hard work. As it is, going to a wedding generally means you put in a day’s hard work for no greater reward than a small serving of unappetising lamb and the chance to dance to My Sharona in public. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/oct/01/marriage-etiquette-mike-smith [b] 38. Attorney-General George Brandis defends $13,000 taxpayer-funded library [/b] Jonathan Swan, James Robertson Attorney-General George Brandis has defended as within his rights spending nearly $13,000 of taxpayer funds over the past four years on his personal library. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/attorneygeneral-george-brandis-defends-13000-taxpayerfunded-library-20131001-2upee.html [b] 39. George Brandis' flimsy expenses excuse a sad reflection on a wedding[/b] "Senator the Honourable George Brandis, QC, gave an impassioned speech about freedom of the press and the pusillanimity and flagrant mendacity of some media proprietors," the groom says on his website. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/george-brandis-flimsy-expenses-excuse-a-sad-reflection-on-a-wedding-20130930-2uoxu.html [b] 40. George Brandis a 'hypocrite' for claiming wedding expenses, says Labor[/b] Gabrielle Chan Bowen said Brandis had made a "de facto admission" in repaying the money, and added: "He's clearly one of the parliament's biggest hypocrites, having held other people to a very high standard, a standard he has failed to meet himself." http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/30/brandis-labelled-hypocrite-wedding-expenses?CMP=ema_632&et_cid=51044&et_rid=7108914&Linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.theguardian.com%2fworld%2f2013%2fsep%2f30%2fbrandis-labelled-hypocrite-wedding-expenses [b] 41. Barnaby Joyce admits he may have claimed petrol costs for a second wedding visit [/b] Patrick Lion FEDERAL Cabinet Minister Barnaby Joyce has admitted he "probably" slugged taxpayers for travel so he could attend another set of nuptials, this time as host of Queensland's "political wedding of the year''. http://www.themercury.com.au/news/national/barnaby-joyce-admits-he-may-have-claimed-petrol-costs-for-a-second-wedding-visit/story-fnj3ty2c-1226730279972?sv=9662820f38104d4374fd9039ca0f65a5#.Ukqo2z63vpA.twitter [u][b]ASYLUM SEEKERS[/b][/u] [b] 42. PM's boats compromise offers a way to ditch tow-back policy[/b] Michael Bachelard, David Wroe Prime Minister Tony Abbott has conspicuously softened his tone towards Indonesia after talks with the nation's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, possibly paving the way to ditch his controversial boats turn-back policy. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/pms-boats-compromise-offers-a-way-to-ditch-towback-policy-20131001-2uqs1.html [b] 43. Abbott stresses 'respect for Indonesian sovereignty' after asylum talks[/b] Kate Lamb Australian PM says two countries 'are determined to end scourge' of people-smuggling after Jakarta talks. Speaking with Indonesia’s president, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, at the state palace, Abbott dropped talk of turning the boats around, instead emphasising his commitment to respecting the sovereignty of Australia’s northern neighbour. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/30/tony-abbott-indonesian-sovereignty-jakarta [b] 44. Seven pointers for stopping the boats ethically[/b] Frank Brennan Is there any ethical discussion to be had about stopping the boats, or is it just a matter of whatever it takes? http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38277#.UkqRpre19ZY (Text version) http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/uploads/media/audio/13/38277.mp3 (Audio 7m.25s) [u][b]EQUALITY MATTERS[/b][/u] [b] 45. The logic behind Julia Gillard’s same-sex marriage opposition[/b] Simon Copland In Julia Gillard’s first interview since she was deposed as Prime Minister a young boy stood up and asked the question many wanted an answer to; “how come you didn’t let gay people get married?” “I think that marriage in our society could play its traditional role and we could come up with other institutions which value partnerships, value love, value lifetime commitment. http://ausopinion.com/2013/10/01/the-logic-behind-julia-gillards-same-sex-marriage-opposition/ [u][b]LEADERSHIP MATTERS[/b][/u] [b] 46. Electing the party leader [/b] Deirdre McKeown On 8 July 2013, then Prime Minister Kevin Rudd announced proposed changes to the way in which the Australian Labor Party elects its leader. http://parliamentflagpost.blogspot.com.au/2013/10/electing-party-leader.html#more [b] 47. Why I am voting for Anthony Albanese[/b] Verity Firth We are all, of course, confined to being very polite about each candidate, which I think has been liberating for a party that has recently behaved like an ill-disciplined child, hurling abuse at colleagues and running away to 'dob' to the media whenever the other side had a small victory. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/opinions/why-i-am-voting-for-anthony-albanese/201309262958?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=db30d8ec29-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_09_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-db30d8ec29-30634093 [b] 48. Conflict addicts[/b] Something interesting that seems to have popped up since September 7th is a strange affliction among we, the chattering classes. For so long, the Labor party has given the gift of ridiculousness and melodrama, that like the sad, slightly unaware addict to soap operas, we can’t seem to tear our eyes away now that they’re no longer the main game. http://ausopinion.com/2013/10/01/conflict-addicts/ [u][b]NDIS[/b][/u] [b] 49. Housing shortfall for young people living in nursing homes[/b] Libby Callaway and Di Winkler. The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is a once-in-a-lifetime disability reform, but a report released today by the Summer Foundation and PwC shows the scheme alone cannot resolve the issue of young people living in nursing homes. http://theconversation.com/housing-shortfall-for-young-people-living-in-nursing-homes-18686 [b] 50. Sophie's Gillard portrait takes its place at Old Parliament House[/b] Matthew Raggatt Thousands come to Canberra each year to tour the national sites, but rarely does a 12-year-old get to see their picture among the historic photos and paintings. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/sophies-gillard-portrait-takes-its-place-at-old-parliament-house-20131001-2upsl.html#ixzz2gRnjst7f [u][b] CLIMATE [/b][/u] [b] 51. What Greg Hunt didn't say about the carbon price and emissions[/b] There's been a lot of hot air blowing around on Labor's carbon policy, including that its pricing scheme has not managed to stem emissions in the 15 months it's been operating. 52. The verdict Mr Hunt based his claim on modelling for the year 2020. He failed to mention that the same modelling projects emissions would go up further if a carbon price wasn't in place. Mr Hunt's claim is misleading. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-01/greg-hunt-carbon-emissions-misleading/4989750 [b] 53. Will the new Climate Council be pursued under campaign finance law? [/b] Andrew Norton But like other new political organisations, they seem blissfully unaware that campaign finance law means red tape for political activists. http://andrewnorton.net.au/ [u][b]ECONOMICS[/b][/u] [b] 54. Gentle exercise is enough to keep your brain fit and healthy [/b] Michelle McDonnell Once upon a time we thought the brain was incapable of changing – if it was broken, it couldn’t be fixed. But that idea has been challenged in the last few decades with research suggesting that the brain is quite changeable or plastic. http://theconversation.com/gentle-exercise-is-enough-to-keep-your-brain-fit-and-healthy-18475?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=The+Weekend+Conversation&utm_content=The+Weekend+Conversation+CID_de94852036728c0df7e9fba3512d6fb7&utm_source=campaign_monitor&utm_term=Gentle%20exercise%20is%20enough%20to%20keep%20your%20brain%20fit%20and%20healthy [b] 55. A few home truths to quash the hysterics [/b] Stephen Koukoulas Have a cup of tea and a good lie down. The house price debate is rapidly running off the rails and throwing up all manner of furphies, melodrama and misconceptions. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/27/property/few-home-truths-quash-hysterics [b] 56. What you missed: an incredible federal budget outcome[/b] Michael Pascoe It's yet another case of politics overshadowing economics: while newbie Treasurer Joe Hockey insinuates otherwise, the final count for the 2012-13 federal budget is an outstanding achievement, a monument to a skilled Treasury performance in very difficult circumstances. No, seriously. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/the-economy/what-you-missed-an-incredible-federal-budget-outcome-20130927-2uik6.html [b] 57. Dealing with debt in a time of low growth[/b] Helge BergerJustin Tyson There is no magic number for how much sovereign debt an economy can shoulder. And as bringing down debt by cutting government spending or raising taxes comes at the risk of reducing growth and employment in the short term, there are arguments to not proceed too hastily. But eventually, debt will have to be put back on a downward path in many countries. This will help rebuild fiscal buffers and cope with the costs of ageing. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/1/economy/dealing-debt-time-low-growth?utm_source=exact&utm_medium=email&utm_content=439386&utm_campaign=pm&modapt= [b] 58. The Economics and Politics of Chaos[/b] PAUL KRUGMAN It’s very important, I think, to realize that while right now the GOP seems to have been taken hostage by its radical wing, the general strategy of responding to a lost election by trying to gain through blackmail what the party couldn’t gain at the polls was a consensus decision, arrived at way back in January. If the leadership is now dismayed by where it finds itself — leading a party of “lemmings with suicide vests” — it has only itself to blame. http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/10/01/the-economics-and-politics-of-chaos/?smid=tw-NytimesKrugman&seid=auto&_r=0 [b] 59. Rebels Without a Clue[/b] PAUL KRUGMAN This may be the way the world ends — not with a bang but with a temper tantrum. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/30/opinion/krugman-rebels-without-a-clue.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss [b] 60. Conspicuous Consumption, Conspicuous Health, and Optimal Taxation[/b] Paul Frijters Is there a health-status race in Australia whereby people get joy from being healthier and fitter than others? And what are the general implications for public policy if there is? http://clubtroppo.com.au/ [b] 61. There won't be any more (rate cuts this year) [/b] Peter Martin The Reserve Bank is done with cutting rates. Expressed in words the market will understand: there’s scarcely any easing bias left. http://www.petermartin.com.au/ [u][b] TODAY’S MAIN NEWS [/b][/u] [b] • ROULE REPORT — Issues of Today [/b] http://paper.li/RouleReport/1334728962 [b] • REAL-TIME NEWS[/b] Margo Kingston The Tweeted Times aggregates news in your Twitter stream and ranks them by popularity among your friends. Never miss any important news! The Tweeted Times is a real-time personalized newspaper generated from your Twitter account. The Tweeted Times rebuilds your newspaper hourly, and is always up-to-date http://tweetedtimes.com/#!/margokingston1 [b] • ASHBYGATE[/b] http://tweetedtimes.com/#!/search/AshbyGate/en [b] • AN EYE ON ABC NEWS: [/b]. Keeping the bastards who keep the bastards honest, honest http://www.abcnewswatch.blogspot.com.au/ [b] • AUSTRALIAN NEWSPAPER FRONT PAGES [/b] www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm

TalkTurkey

2/10/2013Good Morning and Night, Dear Casablanca! Feels like time I weighed me anchor. Sail away to the Land of Dreams ... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~eams/eems/emes/eims? (Write your own ... lots of choice ... Never know what will happen in Dreamland! ) I know though, as sure as we are both still alive come the dawn, [well nearly anyway :)], that as I write, you are scrolling and scanning, reading and poring and cutting and pasting, considering, selecting, collating, more verbs than you can poke a stick at, eventually [i]publishing here [/i]the [i]results[/i] of your solitary labours, (and btw [i]yes of course [/i]you must [i]love[/i] it, otherwise you wouldn't/couldn't do it) but anyway d'you know what, [i]I think there has probably never been the like of what first Lynnie did and now you Casablanca are doing. [/i] Anywhere. I think your work out-dazzles for importance any of the writers whose work you display daily, and they include the best. You are conduits to the rest of the blogosphere, and thereby important teachers to society. EVERYBODY should bruit your work EVERYWHERE we can throughout social media, your efforts should never be underestimated nor taken for granted. And they are at the core of this blog.

2353~

2/10/2013Woodypear - I don't seem to remember you posting before, if this is your first post here - welcome. If I am wrong (again) and you have been here before - welcome back! Your sporting comparison is valid, especially in the era we are currently living in where football is a corporate body with mission statements,financial plans and people "dedicated" to finding that extra 1%. While the football clubs trade on their history; at the higher level they are not a group of mates playing for the honour and glory of competition. Clearly, the politicians will not legislate to create a referee that may restrict their current practices and the old media (which have the same corporate interests as sporting teams in a lot of cases) won't do it either - as demonstrated in recent years, so it is left to the likes of this and other blogs and forums to hold politicians to account.

Pappinbarra Fox

2/10/2013Hello Woodypear, welcome to the TPS. Do come again. One problem with appointing a referee would be that the players are doing the appointing. It is really frustrating that we have to live with outright lies and misleading statements from pollies. And if the pollie is on your side you believe what they say is the truth and if on the other side their lying is very clear. I am afraid it was always thus tho recent trends are towards a worsening situation in that regard. And results like the last one are depressing for the reason that the one referee that can (or should) keep the pollies honest is the ballot box - toss em out if they lie! - but that ref has gone troppo. Enough to make one despair.

Ken

2/10/2013I liked the story about the portraits of the Queen appearing in the Department of PM&C and PM&C's response that Abbott did not order the portraits be put up. Following the theme of this thread about truth, when PM&C says Abbott did not order the portraits be put up,it means Abbott's name does not appear on any piece of paper ordering the portraits up: it does not mean that Abbott did not tell his staff to order PM&C to put them up. It will likely be a staffer who is involved, whose name may appear on the bottom of an e-mail, or even more likely, a no physical evidence, oral communication to someone high in PM&C that the PM may like to see a few portraits of the Queen when he visits the Department. That's how it works!!!

TalkTurkey

2/10/20132353, Pappinbarra Fox, I [i][u]think[/u][/i]* that Woodypear has been here before but that doesn't mean that in future you should hold back if you're not sure ... Au contraire... It's like [i]punishment[/i] ... It goes like this: ... [i]Better that a hundred innocent people be punished, than that a single offender go free ... ...? ..! [/i] Oh no wait! It's not like that at all! It's like this: [i]Better that previously-welcomed previous posters be re-welcomed many times than that one newcomer should remain un-welcomed.[/i] [b[i]]* OR [/i][/b]... Could it be that I've only seen Woodypear on [i]Twitter?[/i] ermmm..??? If so ... Well ... [i]WELCOME WOODYPEAR![/i]

TalkTurkey

2/10/2013[u]The AZYPH[/u] Do you know what an azyph is? Here is an archetypal example: Actual scene: Tony Abborrrtt, as Prime Minister, bids young female journalist [i]Arrggh Fuck off![/i] Media storm reaches 1 on Richter scale, gone next day. Fantasy scenario: *J*U*L*I*A* Gillard,as Prime Minister, bids young male journalist [i]Arrggh Fuck off[/i][i]![/i] Media storm reaches 1 on Richter scale, gone next day. [i]AZYPH![/i] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Have YOU seen any wild Azyphs around? Please give them a loving home here at TPS !

Ad astra

2/10/2013Casablanca I’m still working through your links, but thought I would offer a comment on the initial ones that have a medical flavour. Fiona Stanley’s [i]Let’s treat the social causes of illness rather than just disease[/i], points to a concept crucial to our understanding of health and illness: the “social determinants of health”, one that has been around for quite a while, one particularly emphasized by the World Health Organization. As she states, it focuses on ‘the underlying social mechanisms that harm well-being’. Medical students are fascinated by the genetic and molecular determinants of disease, about which there is much groundbreaking research. They are less inclined to look at the social determinants, yet these too can be as influential as the micro-determinants. As Dr Stanley says: “[i]Within populations, even in wealthy ones such as Australia, analyses of almost all diseases, as well as educational outcomes, disabilities, mental illness, substance abuse, child abuse and neglect and criminal behaviour show a strong relationship with socioeconomic measures. That means there’s a gradient across society with more problems occurring as you move from the better off to those worse off (in terms of resources).”[/i] Shades of the thesis of Joseph Stiglitz on the price of inequality! While specialists and researchers in molecular biology will focus on the micro-biological environment, looking through a ‘telescopic lens’ to bring very small things up close, and epidemiologists and global health specialists focus on the macro-environment, looking through a wide angle lens to take in the big picture, family doctors, who are generalists, need to focus on both. I found that a useful way of illustrating this to students was what I termed the ‘zoom lens approach’. While family doctors need to focus on the fine detail of illness where so many of the answers reside and where therapies often do their work, they need also to focus on how illness affects the whole person, the family and the community. To understand how illness has come about, and how it might be managed, in most instances the family doctor needs to begin with the whole person, then, as symptoms unfold, zoom in to focus on the micro-environment to determine their molecular and genetic causes. But that is not sufficient. The doctor needs to zoom out, to see the whole person, and the family, the community, and the workplace in which the person resides. Often, as Dr Stanley asserts, the causes of illness are social. Poverty, poor parenting, poor education, inadequate skills, lack of opportunity, mental illness, substance abuse, family abuse, criminality, disability, hazardous physical surroundings and an unhealthy family and community environment, are not only predisposing factors or actual causes of illness, they also point to ways of managing illness, and on the other side of the coin, preventing illness and fostering good health. The zoom lens concept encourages generalists to focus on the fine detail, as they must, but just as importantly on the big picture. The capacity to zoom in and out, and a willingness to do this habitually, characterizes the sound family doctor, the proficient generalist. It is coincidental, but this morning there has been a lot of talk on ABC Melbourne radio about soft drinks with high sugar content, now consumed in large quantities by many young people. More and more the harmful effects to health of high sugar consumption are being recognized. Mind you, this is not new. Years ago the World Health Organization developed a policy position on this issue, one that was opposed strongly by the sugar lobby. Nothing has changed. The health experts are insisting that high sugar intake causes serious health effects, prominent among which is type 2 diabetes that is reaching epidemic proportions here. This illness is even more pronounced among the Latino populations in North America, where even teenagers are being afflicted with what was once know as ‘mature-age’ diabetes. Not only is diabetes a burden to the individual and the family, it is an increasing burden to the health of whole communities, and an escalating cost to the health system. Yet on the radio today, along came the sugar lobbyists, opposing any regulation of the sugar content of drinks, asserting that rather than tackling the problem by reducing sugar in the drinks that kids consume, it was a problem for parents to solve, presumably by insisting their kids not drink sugary drinks! It was a classic illustration of the ‘social determinants of health’, and just as classically an illustration of how vested interests are prepared to put profit ahead of community health. This is where progressives and conservatives part company. Progressives show particular concern for the welfare of individuals and communities, and their health, and how ill health might be prevented. Conservatives, especially those of strong neo-liberal bent, favour free markets, light regulation, avoidance of ‘the nanny state’, and prefer individual responsibility to the oversight of the welfare state. Those who say the policies of both sides are the same, are not looking hard enough. Thank you Casablanca for another set of fascinating links.

TalkTurkey

2/10/2013Comrades This letter was sent to me by a mutual friend of mine & the signatory Allen McMahon. I've bolded a bit. Dear Friends, On ABC 891 breakfast radio this morning [b]Mr Jamie Briggs[/b], member for Mayo and junior cabinet minister in the Abbott government, said when referring to the future arrival of people seeking asylum in Australia ' [b]the stock won't be coming[/b].' The podcast is here http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-30/church-backs-keeping-inverbrackie/4988414?section=saand the comment is at 10.23 His office phone no. is [b]08 83985575 [/b]and his email is [b]jamie.briggs.mp@aph.gov.au[/b] I sent Mr Briggs the following email; Dear Mr Briggs, I was appalled that on the ABC 691 breakfast program this morning you referred to people seeking asylum in Australia as "stock". That you could even connect the two together speaks volumes about your attitude and views on those of a different ethnicity to Australians. To compound matters rather than being calm and rational you were angry and aggressive hardly the type of attitude in keeping with your position as a representative for the electorate of Mayo. If that was not bad enough you called the President of the Uniting Church of Australia a lair. [sic... typo.] You called for an apology and that is the only thing we will agree on. You should apologize for your racist comment about asylum seekers, apologize to your constituents for your disgraceful performance this morning and apologize to Andrew Dutney for calling him a liar and treating him with open contempt. You are an utter disgrace. Yours, Allen McMahon ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Please Swordsfolks feel free to express your feelings in your own way!

TalkTurkey

2/10/2013Now here's a funny thing. PQliar if not harhar A week or so ago I got an email from this bloke Marrow, I forget what it said but it was insulting and personally directed at me, first of its kind. Oh the main gist was the wrong Bilney it was that died last year. Anyway, I replied that he seemed like all Marrow & no bone. The bloke came back a few times, I deleted his missives as is my wont with illwillians, one riposte and that's it. Now, I hadn't seen his billet doux at the ends of the last thread but Jason Obelix pointed it out tome just minutes ago! But the weird kicker was, after just one reply from me, then 2 or 3 more from him, I got the email at the end of the one he posted here a couple of days ago. The dates are interesting. That "apology" email to me was dated 29th Sept, the post immediately below was Oct 1 so the "apology" is plainly disingenuous - as I had already guessed! :) Here's what David Marrow said on TPS on October 1. 2013 07:41 PM Truth Bruce Bilney (Talk Turkey) Your comments are totally discredited by your ignoring facts. You claim Andrew Southcott has never practiced as a doctor - yet a simple scan of wikipeadia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Southcott or www.aph.gov.au/.../Parliamentarian?MPID=TK6 shows you for the liar that you are. Further, your ridiculous claim that he "inherited" the seat from his mother is absurd when the seat was previously occupied by Steele Hall http://www.aec.gov.au/profiles/sa/boothby.htm . Isn't it time you hung up your limp political sword? But on 29/9 - note the date - he emailed me Talk Turkey I apologise for my harsh emails which were a leveling up for your sharp political swordsmanship. David Truth | davidmarrowx@gmail.com | 112.213.153.145 | Delete So re his 'apology' here's a little rhyme just for him: Yeah, at the time I thought [i][u]Pig's[/u] [u]Bum[/u]![/i] David, You're the one what's dumb! As for all my lies about the once and still laziest MHR Andrew Southcott, well, he practised as a GP for about long enough to be ignored entirely, and he "inherited" the seat riding on the relatively good name of his old dear, Heather, who was - er - from memory - something like I think [i]once-a-lib[/i], then like a follower of [i]Steele Hall [/i]- What was his mob called, the [i]Liberal Reform Movement [/i]or something? Anyway I think she might've ended up as a Democrat, not sure, something like that. Anyway this bloke in question, her son Andrew, has yet again again again been passed over for any responsible position in this most talentless of Governments, work it out for yourselves folks. Anyway Mr Marrow, if you want a duel I get to choose the weapon, and I choose Flatus at pointblank range. :)

Michael Taylor

2/10/2013What a wonderful post, 2353. I offer my congratulations.

Ad astra

2/10/2013Casablanca I have just now read and bookmarked the article by Frank Brennan, Jesuit priest and lawyer: [i]Equipping students for moral argument.[/i] It is a fine exposition, long but not wordy. Referring to social justice and the law, I was taken by this: “[i] But as a priest in the public square agitating issues of social justice I have found my legal education to be of enormous benefit wrestling with the relationship between law and political morality, law and social justice. I know that many of my legal contemporaries are basically legal positivists who think that most of the moral issues regarding the law are to be determined by elected politicians rather than by unelected judges. I have long been of the view that no lawmaker can escape acute moral questions when determining how to administer justice according to law and how to shape the law so that it maintains resonance with community values. I know there is so much more to law than what goes on in the courts. “For all lawyers, there is no doubt about our duty to our client, our duty to the court. What about our duty to the law? Our duty to society? Our duty to the common good? Do lawyers individually and collectively have an ethical duty to contribute to the development of laws which recognise human rights, uphold the common good, and enhance the community's commitment to justice for all? I think they do.”[/i] After a detailed discussion of the asylum seeker issue, his conclusion too was striking: “[i]I would hope that our law schools will be accessible venues for those wanting to debate these issues in future, just as they were the places to discuss Aboriginal land rights and the limits of self-determination when I was an undergraduate. Law, politics, and public morality all have their place. Law teachers need to encourage the cross-fertilisation of ideas so that justice according to law remains a laudable objective for all persons within the jurisdiction. It’s about much more than individual rights and non-discrimination. We must always be considering the common good, the public interest, group rights as well as individual rights, and the legitimate aspirations of those who are so 'other' or so vulnerable as not to count in the political calculus or judicial reasoning. That's why we need a robust legal academy. Thanks for all you are doing to educate the next generation of judges, members of parliament, and citizens who will both think outside the square of present orthodoxy in pursuit of the universalism which alone guarantees protection of those both inside and outside the square, and have the prudence to know when the square needs to be redrawn.”[/i] I wonder what George Brandis would have written on this subject!

Michael

2/10/2013Abbott says Australian abattoirs are "quite comparable" with Indonesian ones. And that, apparently, means that the ugly images seen on "a TV show" (part of his unctuous apology to Indonesia) (no fault on the part of Indonesia, mind you, the creepy crawling was all Abbott's) those ugly images of animals being grotesquely dealt with in Indonesian abattoirs are easily replicable in Australia. If this is so, and the PM of Australia attests that it IS so, then he needs to get out there and clean up the abattoirs of Australia. What that "TV show" displayed was callous torture of living creatures. To assert that is "quite comparable" and by implication acceptable anywhere on Earth says more about Abbott even than "shit happens" - it tells us he thinks "shit happen"ing is OK if it's our mob and anyone in/lined up with our mob doing it. Stinks like an abattoir anywhere, regardless of how 'humane' the treatment inside might be. 'Abbott sucks up to... fill this space'. Get used to seeing it. He's terrified of/desperate not to be a one term PM, and to secure that second term he'll do anything. Watch him swing in the wind trying to govern/seduce "all Australians", and watch him shed with every twist and turn more and more support. Abbot for/as PM? He's not up to it.

Catching up

2/10/2013A worthy contribution. Congratulations on being first 2353. Can someone tell me why the NZ PM is here, for a fleeting visit. Abbott is now telling the PM how wonderful he has been in dealing with the NZ economy. May times in the past, Abbott has claimed that he did better than Labor, in this country. Wonder why our economy is flourishing, theirs is not. This has to the the greatest stunt of all, to come out of the Abbott camp. No truth in advertising there. The man has crossed the ditch, to lay a wreath. Two minute exposure to the media, where Abbott tells him what a wonderful economical manager he is, and I believe back home again. They will be meeting later in the week at APEC. Hunt said carbon tax does not do the job. FACTS sites. Projection of what they will be. ABC 24. Fact. 1% lower. Electricity. emissions lower. Once again, Hunt is into misleading advertising. Misleading because he used projections, ignoring,. emission would go up higher without the carbon tax. Yes, 2353. your article is timely.

Catching up

2/10/2013Wonder will this government claim credit when the interest rates begin to rise, a I suspect not, it will be Labor's fault. 555459

Catching up

2/10/2013We have Abbott with the fleeting, goodness know what for visit of the NZ PM, taking a few minutes to congratulate him, on how he has done much better that us, under Labor. Where is his evidence?. The man went to Indonesia, and all I can see, that he thinks he achieved is getting on his knees, groveling, apologizing for the sins of Labor, Ms. Gillard, in particular. By the way, it is Howard leglistion that NZ wants changed.

2353~

2/10/2013Migs - thanks for the comment. Coming from you it is high praise indeed.

Michael

2/10/2013The economic stats from New Zealand today: "Unemployment Rate in New Zealand increased to 6.40 percent in the second quarter of 2013 from 6.20 percent in the first quarter of 2013." www.tradingeconomics.com/new-zealand/unemployment-rate Unemployment in Australia is 5.80 percent. Go here: http://www.nationaldebtclocks.org/debtclock/newzealand to find National Debt as percentage of GDP in New Zealand is 38.5%. For Australia it is 18.5%. [Just type Australia in place of New Zealand in the above URL.] http://www.tradingeconomics.com/new-zealand/balance-of-trade will show that: New Zealand recorded a trade deficit of 1191 Million NZD in August of 2013. Whereas Australia recorded a trade deficit of 815 Million AUD in August of 2013, displayed here: http://www.tradingeconomics.com/australia/balance-of-trade The population of NZ in 2012 was 4,433,100. The population of Australia in 2012 was 22,683,600. The trade deficit vis-a-vis the population speaks for itself - populations buy imports. In 2010 it was estimated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics than 544,171 New Zealand-born persons were resident in Australia. Those people, and those who have come since, are voting with their feet and their wallets about our comparative cross-Tasman Sea national economies. The numbers prove once again that... Abbott was lying through his teeth when commending John Key on getting the NZ economy so right compared to Labor's economic stewardship in Australia. Quelle f***ing surprise!

Casablanca

2/10/2013Ad @ October 2. 2013 12:09 PM and October 2. 2013 04:03 PM You write very well. You should think about contributing articles here. (lol) Glad that you were impressed by Frank Brennan's article [i]Equipping students for moral argument.[/i]He always provides much food for thought.

Catching up

2/10/2013The truth will emerge, in spite of their false advertising. ".....But as it did not release its costings we still don't actually know how the Government intends to meet its target. Fortunately by around October 18 we will get the details. The Parliamentary Budget Office is required within 30 days after the caretaker period (which ended when the Abbott Government was sworn in on September 18) to prepare a post-election report setting out costings of the publicly announced policies of all parliamentary parties. Until then we can only......" http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-02/jericho-abbott-public-service-cuts/4991120?WT.mc_id=newsmail

Ken

2/10/2013Ad and Casablanca Brennan is very much in the Jesuit social justice tradition. My late maternal grandfather was a devout Catholic and often quoted material from the Australian Catholic Social Justice Council - which puts out an annual statement and used to (not sure if it still does) brief papers on specific social issues. It was that side of the Catholic church that gave rise to the revolutionary priests of South America a few decades back (and we ended up with Pell!!!!). The Social Justice Council appears very left at times in its statements. As I said, my grandfather would quote them but also quote Marx and did not see any conflict between the two (although the church did)????

TalkTurkey

2/10/2013This site is like a tomato-sauce bottle First none'll come 'n' then a lot'll! Catching up, The more I see of your posts the more I like what I see. You are very much to the point, still you seem a little self-deprecating, as if you are not quite confident of the value of your posts - well in those words made famous by Queensland's beloved late lamented dictator Jo, Don't You Worry About That! [DYWAT] You talk good sense. And Michael, your quiet passion and informed insightful posts enrich us every time, thanks on behalf of the rest of us, I bet you are one good worker at whatever you might do. TPS right now feels a bit like when I learnt to drive, in an old Vauxhall ute with a fairly sudden clutch ... Let it out ever so gently, nothing .... nothhhh-innnnnngggg ..... WOOP! WOOP! WOOP! when the clutch finally engaged, and several kangaroo hops later, off we'd go. But I learnt to drive all right. As we are learning to drive this lusty site. Miglo you give us all confidence.

TalkTurkey

2/10/2013Ad astra I bid you Welcome on behalf of The Political Sword, I don't think you've been here before but if you have, well, Welcome Back. :) (This was really just a pale echo of Casablanca's genuinely funny and original joke at 6.11PM!)

TalkTurkey

2/10/2013This is funny https://twitter.com/eliistender10/status/385359589631221760/photo/1

Casablanca

2/10/2013TT We are a great double act. As an after thought to what I said at 6.11pm, I thought, Oh! maybe we should give Ad a very big and heartfelt welcome back as a commenter/commentator.

Ad astra

2/10/2013TT, Casablanca Thank you for your warm welcome. I shall return. I may even write something!

Catching up

2/10/2013TalkTurkey, some say I have too much confidence. Thanks anyway.

TalkTurkey

3/10/2013Catching up Don't let those who say you have too much confidence sap your confidence. They probably are suffering from a lack of confidence that can only be assuaged by denting the confidence of others. They are of no account here. Be confident. One of the effects for me that blogging here - appreciating and being appreciated by others, over a period of years - has had is to have made me confident that [i]my point of view is likely to be as good as the next punter's[/i] ... It depends who that might be of course, but due to the information exchange throughout social media and here on TPS in particular, I certainly have instant access to whatever intelligence is available to the public at all, and that gives me confidence. I owe the Sword much in that respect. It always comes back to the twin influences of Ad Astra's threads and Lyn's links. For me there was nowhere else I really needed to go looking, it was all there at my fingertips. Thanks to Casablanca and The Team it still is. There is a benign teacher feeling about this blog too, a desire to help others to a rational informed point of view for the benefit of all, I'm very comfortable with that. Everybody is a Teacher after all ... We're all everything, Cook, Nurse, Inventor, Builder, Fighter, Whateverer, but here we aren't cooking or nursing, we're learning and teaching, that's why we're here, and that's why TPS is so important, to teach others, (because most of us here are pretty humanistic anyway.) On Thursday April 1 2010 Ad astra wrote the discussion starter [i]What Do You Want From the Political Sword?[/i] At this time we should be thinking about TPS's roots. You can find it in the archives of course. I reckon it's worth revisiting. As is Ad's very first post on Saturday 13th September, [i]Welcome to The Political Sword Blog[/i] If you haven't read that first one especially - (as Janice certainly has!:) ) - well I think you should. It's short, and it's [i]perfect[/i]. The notions there are still and always the philosophical linchpin of this blog. As long as we are true to the core values and aspirations that run like a golden thread through Ad's writings, we will be united and our power will burgeon. I've never seen an intemperate nor an ill-considered nor ignorant comment from Ad astra. That is a record we must build into a tradition, and the reason we must do so goes back to first principles, viz., to hold the Media and Politicians to account - for which we must be competent, and most especially, beyond reproach. For The Sword is primarily our [i]weapon[/i], really not a plaything, and our enemies are mighty. They seek always to trivialise the 5th Estate. And why, because they fear us of course. Our swelling ability, almost beyond their control now, to engage the masses. Our strength must be in our Truth. Because then We're better than Them.

Casablanca

3/10/2013 [u][b]CASABLANCA'S CACHE[/b][/u] for Wednesday, 2 October 2013 [u][b]DEMOCRACY, GOVERNMENT & POLITICS[/b][/u] 1. The public service guide to getting mogged The Cubicle Brothers The Cubicle Brothers are in a slightly sombre mood as they examine the machinery of government or "mogging". And what's with those ridiculous departmental acronyms? "Machinery of government" is a curious phrase. At worst it has sinister overtones, the underlying workings of a dystopian fantasy. At best it elicits the image of a Theo Janssen Strandbeest - an awkward and gangly concoction with limbs aplenty, that somehow manages to move in a harmony that drives the whole thing forward. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/act-news/the-public-service-guide-to-getting-mogged-20131002-2urt0.html#ixzz2gZF6MABF 2. Hard man hoist by his petard Jack Waterford One does not have to be politically partisan to enjoy enormously the own goal which seriously threatens the career of George Brandis, Attorney-General. Nothing is ever so delicious as watching the karma of a person who has wielded the sword finding himself skewered by someone else. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/hard-man-hoist-by-his-petard-20131001-2uqz2.html 3. Abbott’s Press Event Shuts Out Local Reporters Sandra Siagian Despite Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s push to strengthen ties with Indonesia during a meeting with business and government delegates on Tuesday morning, a press conference following the breakfast was restricted to the Australian media. “Australia has good press freedom and so they should practice that in Indonesia as well,” http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/abbotts-local-press-event-shuts-out-local-reporters/ 4. Abbott a Hit, Barely, With Business Leaders Sandra Siagian While the country’s leading business lobby welcomed Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s call on Tuesday to boost economic ties, some local business leaders voiced concerns over the conservative leader’s narrow approach to bilateral trade. http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/news/abbott-a-hit-barely-with-business-leaders/ 5. Kim H ‏@ideasaplenty 2h @margokingston1 @ideasaplenty: Looks like TA went to the Mr. Magoo School of Diplomatic Relations. "Oh TA you've done it again." 6. A sure-footed Abbott had no need of 'L-plates' Mark Kenny Abbott's achievement is orthodox diplomacy: building in wriggle room, making progress where the parties can, and putting thorny issues into a longer term framework. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/a-surefooted-abbott-had-no-need-of-lplates-20131001-2uqry.html 7. Tony Abbott’s Visit to Indonesia: A Real Statesman in the Making? Catherine McGrath If new Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott really wanted to build a fresh relationship with Indonesia he was going to have to start changing the “vibe.” Effectively Australia had to “get off its high horse.” A new direction seemed to begin to develop this week. http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/opinion/tony-abbotts-visit-to-indonesia-a-real-statesman-in-the-making/ 8. Abbott nails Jakarta Tony Kevin The major cloud that had hung over the visit in its last preparatory days — the vexed issue of intemperate Australian responses to uncontrolled asylum-seeker boat departures from Indonesia — was deftly dispelled. http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=38285#.Ukw12re19ZY 9. Australia had a government shutdown once. In the end, the queen fired everyone in Parliament. Max Fisher The United States' self-imposed federal government shutdown has a way of making people around the world shake their heads in bewilderment. As Georgetown professor Erik Voeten wrote for The Washington Post's new Monkey Cage political science blog, "I cannot think of a single foreign analogy to what is happening in the U.S. today." http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/10/01/australia-had-a-government-shutdown-once-it-ended-with-the-queen-firing-everyone-in-parliament/ 10. If It Happened There ... the Government Shutdown Joshua Keating But the pleasant autumn weather disguises a government teetering on the brink. Because, at midnight Monday night, the government of this intensely proud and nationalistic people will shut down, a drastic sign of political dysfunction in this moribund republic. http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2013/09/30/potential_government_shutdown_how_would_the_u_s_media_report_on_it_if_it.html 11. Australian Demographic Statistics. March Quarter, 2013 ABS This is the first release following the process of final rebasing to the 2011 Census and recasting of ERP back to September 1991. http://www.ausstats.abs.gov.au/ausstats/subscriber.nsf/0/84D2A16FF381461FCA257BF100136812/$File/31010_mar%202013.pdf 12. Church pledges accountability on abuse Barney Zwartz The Catholic Church will create independent strategies for handling clergy sex abuse complaints by the end of next year in response to widespread criticisms, it has told the royal commission. The 207-page submission tackles criticisms of Towards Healing, but denies that the church does not report complaints to police. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/church-pledges-accountability-on-abuse-20131002-2usyc.html [u][b]ELECTORAL MATTERS[/b][/u] 13. Let’s get this party started: Third party voting in the Senate Greg Tangey Australia has long been regarded as a stable two party system. .. The 2013 election has not only changed the government but it has also brought about a significant change in the Three Party Preferred Senate voting pattern. For the first time in Australian electoral history the “Other Party” has not finished third overall. http://ausopinion.com/2013/10/02/lets-get-this-party-started-third-party-voting-in-the-senate/ 14. A close-run thing: the narrowest of margins Toby Bellwood The Australian Electoral Commission has announced that the electorate of Fairfax will proceed to a formal recount in the 2013 federal election. Clive Palmer (Palmer United Party) leads with a margin of seven votes following the full distribution of preferences. Just how unusual is this outcome, and how many other close results have there been in Australian electoral history? http://parliamentflagpost.blogspot.com.au/2013/10/a-close-run-thing-narrowest-of-margins.html 15. The $1m mistake: senator's poll windfall Heath Aston NSW senator-elect David Leyonhjelm, who admits he benefited from voters mistaking him for a Liberal Party candidate on the ballot paper, will receive more than $1 million from taxpayers as a result of his hefty primary vote. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/the-1m-mistake-senators-poll-windfall-20131001-2uqs6.html 16. Nationals itching to be Coalition of the still willing John Warhurst The Nationals are one model for a minor party. They can be an important contributor to the diversity of the Australian party system. The surface picture looks all rosy. The rewards of integration are real and tempting. But beneath the surface more independent party thinking is struggling to break out. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/ct-letters/nationals-itching-to-be-coalition-of-the-still-willing-20131002-2uswr.html#ixzz2gZnbzliI [u][b]ASYLUM SEEKERS[/b][/u] 17. Editorial: To Boost Trade, Solve Asylum-Seeker Issue Jakarta Globe Indonesia and Australia are close neighbors and enjoy close ties. And even though our bilateral relations have not always been smooth, pragmatism and rationality have in the end always prevailed. The fact that Australia’s new leader has decided to make Jakarta his first foreign destination can only bode well for our future cooperation http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/opinion/editorial-to-boost-trade-solve-asylum-seeker-issue/ [u][b] GENDER EQUALITY [/b][/u] 18. The group that believe violence against women is a conspiracy Pauline Hopkins Last week, exactly one year after Jill Meagher’s disappearance, when her killer was appealing against his sentence, a large sticker was pasted onto the entrance to my workplace. It read “False rape allegation: will your son be next?" http://www.dailylife.com.au/news-and-views/dl-opinion/the-group-that-believe-violence-against-women-is-a-conspiracy-20131001-2uqgc.html 19. (Still) not enough women in media Jane Gilmore There’s been a huge amount of commentary about the lack of women in the new federal cabinet. Most, in fact nearly all, of that comment is by the male writers who dominate the media. How has the gender imbalance changed over the last year? http://www.kingstribune.com/index.php/weekly-email/item/1896-still-not-enough-women-in-media [u][b]THE ECONOMY, TAXATION & INCOME RE-DISTRIBUTION[/b][/u] 20. Abbott must reboot 'Australia tax' reforms Ross Gittins When government changes hands, it's possible for important issues to fall between the cracks and useful work to be lost. In late July, a Labor-constituted parliamentary committee issued a report about the ''Australia tax''. It drew a fair bit of media attention at the time but, coming so close to the election campaign, was soon forgotten. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/comment/abbott-must-reboot-australia-tax-reforms-20131001-2uqmx.html#ixzz2gZp0rb2O 21. When Did We Decide That Ending Poverty Was a Good Idea? Joshua Keating Even if “making poverty history” or a “world free of poverty,” as the World Bank puts it, may not be achievable goals, it’s self-evident that we should at least be working toward them, right? Actually, the idea that poverty should be eliminated is a relatively new one http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_world_/2013/09/30/when_did_we_decide_ending_poverty_was_a_good_idea_before_the_enlightenment.html?wpisrc=obinsite 22. Poverty, then and now. Part 1, Rich Man, Poor Man Brian Keeley. September 20, 2013 Well into the 19th century, poverty was widely seen as inevitable: Economists estimate that in 1820 around 84% of the earth’s population lived in absolute poverty. Poverty was also seen as useful: “Everyone but an idiot knows that the lower classes must be kept poor or they will never be industrious,” the English writer and traveller Arthur Young wrote in 1771. http://www.oecdinsights.org/2013/09/20/poverty-then-and-now-part-1-rich-man-poor-man/ [u][b]CLIMATE CHANGE[/b][/u] 23. Turning values into (direct) action Simon Copland 24 September 2013 Falling support for strong climate policies reflects the environment movement’s failure to frame the debate effectively, argues Simon Copland. It’s time to co-opt Tony Abbott’s idea of “direct action” http://inside.org.au/turning-values-into-direct-action/#sthash.Ef7k4D6B.dpuf 24. Australia’s warmest 12-month period on record, again Australia’s record for warmest 12-month period has been broken for a second consecutive month. This continues a remarkable sequence of warmer-than-average months for Australia since June 2012. September 2013 was easily Australia’s warmest September on record http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/change/ 25. Will the new Climate Council be pursued under campaign finance law? Andrew Norton The new not-for-profit Climate Council, set up to replace the now-abolished taxpayer funded Climate Commission, has had a successful launch. According to The Age, it has received $900,000 in donations in its first week. But like other new political organisations, they seem blissfully unaware that campaign finance law means red tape for political activists. http://andrewnorton.net.au/2013/10/01/will-the-new-climate-council-be-pursued-under-campaign-finance-law/ 26. Lawson, Climate Change and the Power of Wishful Thinking GPWayne Nigel Lawson, co-founder of UK-based climate change denial lobbying group GWPF (Global Warming Policy Foundation), wrote a damning article for the UK’s Daily Telegraph. From the title alone, it’s pretty clear this was not going to be an appeal to reason: “Climate change: this is not science – it’s mumbo jumbo”. http://www.skepticalscience.com/news.php?n=2215 TODAY’S MAIN NEWS • ROULE REPORT — Issues of Today http://paper.li/RouleReport/1334728962 • AN EYE ON ABC NEWS: . Keeping the bastards who keep the bastards honest, honest http://www.abcnewswatch.blogspot.com.au/ • AUSTRALIAN NEWSPAPER FRONT PAGES www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm • NEWS HEADLINES http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

Catching up

3/10/2013Yes, this government does have there priorities correct. Yes, all legislation needs to be gone through, to get rid of the word program, to replace with programmes. I like the latter, but have given up, as spell checkers, keep changing it. Does it really matter. Both spellings appear legit.

Catching up

3/10/2013No Abbott may have no need of L plates. I suspect he needs all licenses taken off him. Looks like once again,one does not find corruption in the Builders Laborers Unions, but in the companies that employ them. I wonder if the Coalitions are going to rush out, and create a special court to deal with them. Talking about Leighton Holdings.

Michael

3/10/2013The Queen's picture is on the wall, 'programs' are 'programmes' again, and all is well under PM Menzies... Expect soon the return of no funding for schools without flagpoles and the flag flying as the National Anthem is mumbled through by the entire staff and student population each morning. Concerning the posts above about Abbott doing so well in Indonesia, don't swallow it. This is just part of the new mainstream iteration follow-through from before the election. Then, no Abbott stuff-ups were reported, now, every lurching step is a mark of his divine destiny to lead Australia. We here and places beyond know exactly where he will 'lead Australia', and if it takes seeing a craven public service moving swiftly to change their spellcheckers to accommodate a perceived preference on his part, then we already know that conformity will be valued above anything else. Keeping heads down as a means of survival under a government? Where the bloody Hell are we?!

Casablanca

3/10/2013It was Gough who decreed that we would get rid of, might I say, the specificity of [quote]'programme'[/quote] in favour of [quote]'program'[/quote]. Many of the current crop of public servants were not born or were still in short pants when this change took place and thus would have escaped any programmatic specificity until Howard's time at the top.

Catching up

3/10/2013Once again, back to the past. Turnbull now on. ABC 24 Ziggy for the job. Turnbull getting questioned, for a change.

Michael

3/10/2013Tim Dunlop goes la-la here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/dunlop-why-labor-should-vote-to-repeal-the-price-on-carbon/4995822 To which I have posted there: The 'Abbott Error' has clearly introduced a new era of schizoid thinking when your arguments against the central thesis of your article are stronger than those for it.

Casablanca

3/10/2013 The following article reminds me of a question that has been in my mind for some months now: Is Margie Abbott an Australian citizen or still a card carrying Kiwi? The answer is probably a yes, given the Mad Monk's stance as revealed in the listed article. Tony Abbott bluntly rejects calls for residency rights for NZ migrants after meeting with PM John Key Naomi Woodley and staff Prime Minister Tony Abbott has bluntly rejected calls to give around 200,000 New Zealanders living in Australia greater access to citizenship, taxpayer benefits and other government support. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/tony-abbott-rejects-calls-for-nz-citizenship-access/4995286

Ad astra

3/10/2013Casablanca You served us a rich meal of links today. I have bookmarked several for future reference; they touch on political fundamentals. 21 and 22 were most revealing – I look forward to the following parts of [i]Poverty, now and then[/i]. 23 and 26 were fascinating to read. Anyone doubting the reality of global warming should read 24. The art of communicating with the public on complex issues, such as global warming, is vexed. We have much to learn. I’ll try to get hold of George Lakoff’s [i]The Political Mind[/i] for reading on my trip up north; I hope I can get it as an e-book that I can read on my tablet. I’m already looking forward to tomorrow’s batch.

Catching up

3/10/2013Maybe Tim Dunlop's suggestion makes a little sense. If he is saying, let the carbon tax, which is not a tax go, but focus on fighting to keep the remainder of the CEF suite. Abbott barely mentioned them, except to connect in to the so called tax. It would force comparison between the CEF and DA. Would make Abbott have to declare early in the piece, on hope he funds his. Would bring the focus back on man made climate change, instead of the word, tax. The focus would be on, what the so called tax, paid by the biggest emitters was funding. Just a thought.

Curi-Oz

3/10/2013Well, my household has decided to vote with our pockets after saving hard for a couple of years, and finished installing the air-conditioning and solar panels this week. We haven't needed the AC this week, but the day and a half the solar panels have been on the roof, we have been amused to have contributed 23kW back to the grid so far. To a certain extent, we don't care about the rebate, but by relieving the pressure on the grid for the coming summer feel as if we are doing our bit to reduce reliance on coal fired electricity (and we will need the air conditioning this summer ... it's likely to be hotter than last year, I fear)

Casablanca

4/10/2013 [b]CASABLANCA'S CACHE: Friday, 4 October 2013[/b] [b]DEMOCRACY, GOVERNMENT & POLITICS[/b] Unabashed LNP Politics 1. Abbott defuses diplomatic tensions of his own making. Jonathon Green Stand still long enough and Australian politics will run rings round you, confound you with its endless convolutions, and amaze with its capacity for constant confident reinvention totally detached from history, logic and conscience. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/green-abbott-defuses-diplomatic-tensions-of-his-own-making/4994484 2. The Dog Whistle: the “DIPLOMANIA” edition On this week’s Dog Whistle, Ed Butler, El Gibbs and Kate Carruthers talk about Tony Abbott’s visit to Indonesia in the wake of some four years of raised pulses on asylum seekers, whether Albo and Shorten’s battle is giving the government free air, and just how broken is Amercia? http://ausopinion.com/2013/10/02/the-dog-whistle-the-diplomania-edition/ 3. Hockey mulls separate debt for infrastructure Laura Tingle Treasurer Joe Hockey is considering identifying government borrowings raised to fund infrastructure as separate from debt raised to cover the budget deficit as the Abbott government contemplates an infrastructure spending splurge. 4. Hockey opts to hide the debt AAP Mr Hockey confirmed last week the government was “looking at ways that we can stimulate growth, particularly in the next 18 months and beyond”. “There is a challenge that we recognised in opposition, and the government talked about, of sustaining growth and increasing economic growth,” he told reporters. http://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2013/10/hockey-opts-to-hide-the-debt/ 5. 20th century solutions to 21st century transport problems Michael Pascoe. Executing a 180-degree turn is a tricky manoeuvre for a naval fleet as big as the one sailing into Sydney Harbour this weekend. While there's less danger to life, limb and rigging, it's also difficult for a coalition that's spent the past four years fighting a phoney war about government debt. But there are more signs that Joe Hockey is signalling that just such a turn is in the offing. The big bloke is about to attempt a backflip with half twist – everybody stand back. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/comment-and-analysis/20th-century-solutions-to-21st-century-transport-problems-20131003-2uv4e.html 6. Ministers' muzzling a dangerous strategy in government Mark Kenny In one of the lighter moments towards the end of the recent presidential-style election campaign, Labor's campaign headquarters issued a press statement configured as a faux police bulletin. It said grave fears were held for the whereabouts of once high profile Liberals, Peter Dutton, Sophie Mirabella, and Eric Abetz. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/ministers-muzzling-a-dangerous-strategy-in-government-20131003-2utc1.html 7. Tony Abbott rules out review of Minchin protocol on expenses Bridie Jabour The prime minister has ruled out a review of the Minchin protocol, which allows MPs to pay back incorrectly claimed expenses without a timeframe, multiple times and with no consequence. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/03/tony-abbott-rules-out-review-of-minchin-protocol-on-expenses?CMP=soc_568 Government 8. Academics, public affairs and policymaking J. R. Nethercote When Professor Tim Flannery and his colleagues from the disbanded Climate Commission decided to reconstitute it as the Australian Climate Council, financed by private donations for the purpose of informing Australians about climate change, they (perhaps unwittingly) reverted to a mode of public information and education that figured prominently in Australia's public affairs from the self-government era in the mid-19th century until the generation after World War II. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/academics-public-affairs-and-policymaking-20130928-2ul6k.html#ixzz2gdAujNld 9. “Fearless in public service. In sincerity unexcelled” Jackie Dickenson Indi’s new local member Cathy McGowan fits into a long tradition of independently minded country MPs...a hardy species. http://inside.org.au/fearless-in-public-service-in-sincerity-unexcelled/#sthash.d2HdFFag.dpuf 10. The politics of promoting an 'apolitical' APS Richard Mulgan With his abrupt removal of a few departmental secretaries, the new Prime Minister, Tony Abbott, certainly produced the headlines he wanted. ''PM wields axe'', ''mandarins toppled'', ''public service shake-up'' and so on. The message, we were told, was aimed at the public service as a whole, reminding them that a new government was in town and would brook no resistance. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/public-service/the-politics-of-promoting-an-apolitical-aps-20130929-2ulzt.html#ixzz2gdA0Hjc6 11. Shutting Down the Government: Could It Happen Here? M Nash I was asked yesterday afternoon if we could we have a US-style shut-down here in Australia. The short answer is “probably not.” http://ausopinion.com/2013/10/03/shutting-down-the-government/ 12. Tony Abbott urged to set up white-collar crime-fighting agency in response to Leighton scandal Richard Baker, Nick McKenzie The Abbott government is being urged to consider whether Australia should establish a specialist white collar-crime fighting agency amid the fallout from reports of alleged corruption and mis-conduct involving the Leighton group of companies. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/business/tony-abbott-urged-to-set-up-whitecollar-crimefighting-agency-in-response-to-leighton-scandal-20131003-2uv8i.html 13. Tony Abbott’s win attracted little interest among Beijingers. Does it matter? Probably not James Leibold The contrast with Kevin Rudd couldn’t be starker, yet the Anglophile PM might have a certain edge. http://inside.org.au/abbott-beijing/#sthash.ctXlumkQ.dpuf [b]NBN & OTHER CABLES[/b] 14. Malcolm Turnbull appoints Ziggy Switkowski as chairman of NBN Co Former Optus and Telstra chief executive Ziggy Switkowski has been named as the new chairman of the National Broadband Network Company. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/ziggy-switkowski-appointed-chairman-of-nbn/4996960 15. NBN Co gets Ziggy with it Supratim Adhikari Turnbull was keen not to dwell on the finer points of Switkowski’s tenure as Telstra boss, choosing instead to extoll the credentials of the quorum in place. Switkowski may not be a visionary, but he is exactly the sort of corporate foot soldier the Coalition wants and needs to take charge of the project. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/3/technology/nbn-co-gets-ziggy-it 16. Can Switkowski save the NBN from a nuclear winter? Paul Wallbank Ironically Switkowski’s failure to embrace the internet at both Optus and Telstra allowed dozens of smaller operators to thrive: particularly OzEmail, which counted the current communications minister among its shareholders. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/3/technology/can-switkowski-save-nbn-nuclear-winter 17. Workers reunite to remember coaxial cable project that revolutionised Australian telecommunications Matilda Butler Workers who played a crucial role in enabling Australians to watch live television and make phone calls without going through a telephone exchange have been reunited in Sydney. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/cable-reunion/4997104 [b]INSIGHTS, MEMORIES & REGRETS[/b] 18. Why the Gillard memory won't be easily forgotten Michael Gawenda Thousands of adoring Gillard supporters turned up at the Opera House and thousands more to the Melbourne Town Hall and not all of them were women – some were fathers of daughters and partners of young women – and all of them were there to celebrate Gillard as Australia’s first female prime minister. http://www.businessspectator.com.au/comment/478136 19. Gillard’s most prime ministerial performance: Why did she wait until now? Cathy Alexander "Nothing in her political life / became her like the leaving it" — adapted from Macbeth for Julia Gillard Now that Julia Gillard is no longer prime minister, she seems intent on demonstrating why she should have been an excellent one. As one savvy political observer said after the event: "The person we saw on the stage tonight was probably Australia's best prime minister ever. Pity we never saw it when she was prime minister." http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/opinions/gillards-most-prime-ministerial-performance-why-did-she-wait-until-now/201310022982?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=288f760b15-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_10_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-288f760b15-30634093 20. My cold war: from Brunswick to Berlin (via the Labor split) Geoffrey Barker 27 September 2013 Within months of the end of the second world war, an iron curtain had fallen across Europe. Its impact reached into the inner suburbs of Melbourne. http://inside.org.au/my-cold-war-from-brunswick-to-berlin-via-the-labor-split/#sthash.RrbdTn4Q.dpuf 21. Labor guru to release candid Rudd diary The Rudd Rebellion: The campaign to save Labor. Kevin Rudd's chief strategist Bruce Hawker has chosen a questionable title for a book that promises to reveal how his old boss manoeuvred to resume, and again lose, the prime-ministership. The book will hit shelves on November 4. http://au.news.yahoo.com/a/19223092/labor-guru-to-release-candid-rudd-diary/ 22. Women who help women (and those who don't) Marina Go Transformational change for female leadership requires us to think beyond our personal goals with the bigger picture in mind. More women gathering at the tops of all the trees benefits women, men and organisations. http://www.womensagenda.com.au/talking-about/the-daily-juggle/women-who-help-women-and-those-who-don-t/201310012977?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=288f760b15-Women_s_Agenda_daily_02_10_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-288f760b15-30634093 23. It’s time Paul Rodan. 26 September 2013 Australia is best served when former prime ministers leave parliament with dispatch. http://inside.org.au/its-time/#sthash.Kz0tXs3J.dpuf [b]ELECTIONS & ELECTORAL MATTERS[/b] 24. Labor must suck it up and relent on carbon pricing Tim Dunlop Labor faces a difficult choice, but ultimately protecting the norms of democratic governance is more important than taking a symbolic stand against repealing the price on carbon. The concept of a mandate is doubly difficult when the newly elected government has been vague about what exactly they are planning to do on any number of issues. You cannot claim consent - let alone a mandate - for an agenda that you did not make explicit. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/dunlop-why-labor-should-vote-to-repeal-the-price-on-carbon/4995822 25. The left blames preferences at its own peril Simon Copland Now, I think the Senate system seriously has its issue. But I fear that if the left seems to be focusing all of its ire at the Senate preferencing system. If we continue to do so it will be at our own peril. http://ausopinion.com/2013/10/03/the-left-blames-preferences-at-its-own-peril/ 26. Defending the interests of the Australian plutocracy David Llewellyn-Smith Propaganda campaigns from vested interests have unduly influenced the past three election results, and the mark of the Australian plutocracy doesn't end there. We pay a high price for this in entrenched inflation and lousy productivity, but increasingly, it appears, we are also paying a price in our liberal democratic system. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/llewellyn-smith-the-australian-plutocracy/4996210 27. Clive Palmer forced to wait for Senate power Mark Coultan and Andrew Burrell Senator Ludlam told the ABC last night: "That is the sort of result our voting system throws up from time to time. It is an elegant system being expertly gamed and manipulated. http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/clive-palmer-forced-to-wait-for-senate-power/story-fn59niix-1226731911753#sthash.kDxjOQgz.dpuf 28. Family First Senator-elect Bob Day calls for changes to unfair dismissal, minimum wage laws ... long-time Liberal Party member and now South Australian Family First Senator-elect Bob Day says he will fight to allow employers to pay workers below the minimum wage when he joins the Upper House. Mr Day has also criticised the Federal Government's paid parental leave policy, describing it as fundamentally unfair and inequitable. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/family-first-senator-elect-bob-day-speaks-out/4995940 29. Independent in Indi: what happens now? (And why the Electoral Commission is suddenly under attack) Podcast Peter Clarke talks to Brian Costar about why Cathy McGowan is likely to serve more than one term, why the Electoral Commission is under attack, and who should leader the Labor Party http://inside.org.au/independent-in-indi/#sthash.9TSpmkAt.dpuf 30. Recount refusal seals Greens' Senate defeat Michael Hopkin Given the way in which preferences flowed, Senator Ludlam would have needed only eight more votes to keep his seat. His defeat came despite the WA Greens claiming third place in the primary vote....Scott Ludlum has vowed to appeal the Australian Electoral Commission's decision to refuse requests for a recount of WA Senate votes. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/recount-refusal-seals-greens-senate-defeat-20131003-2ux38.html [b]ECONOMICS[/b] 31. Trade figures reveal how much Australians spend online Rebecca Hyam Official figures suggest Australians spent $7.6 billion on purchases from overseas websites in the year to July. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/trade-revision-reveals-how-much-australians-are-spending-online/4996942 32. Australia's tax mix: examining the case for a rise in GST The main reason for a consumption tax is that even when things are tough, people still keep consuming And this week the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development released a paper, Tax Policy Landscape: Five Years after the Crisis, which showed that Australia’s taxation revenue declined much more dramatically than in most OECD nations – primarily because of our high dependency on corporate and income taxes, and low dependency on consumption taxes (the GST). http://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics/2013/sep/27/grogonomics-gst-tax-mix 33. Dreaming of home El Gibbs Housing - its tax status, regulation, availability and cost - is an inherently political issue. Yet it didn't feature in the recent election campaign and it isn’t on the new Federal Government's agenda. Once upon a time, however, an Australian government enquiry found that citizens had a right to a home. http://www.kingstribune.com/index.php/weekly-email/item/1899-dreaming-of-home 34. The free-for-all of property advice Peter Koulizos Record low interest rates are stoking Australia’s property market, with some expressing concern that property spruikers are targeting self managed superannuation funds investing in the sector. http://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2013/10/the-free-for-all-of-property-advice/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Daily+MacroBusiness&utm_content=Daily+MacroBusiness+CID_22f5ce500325dca9da6c276e995cfd51&utm_source=Email+marketing+software&utm_term=The+free-for-all+of+property+advice [b]ASYLUM SEEKERS[/b] 35. Australia has an obligation to refugees Mike Steketee It is remarkable how rarely in the Australian debate about boat people the basic facts rate a mention. Downer's arrogance was exceeded only by the ignorance of his comments. The ignorance was feigned because, as a former foreign minister, Downer of all people knew that what he was saying was plain wrong. But as a former politician Downer also knew that his comments, offensive as they were to Indonesia, reflected Australian public sentiment. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/steketee-indonesia-refugee-tension/4995732 36. New evidence suggests Australia was warned about humanitarian crisis in East Timor and failed to act James Bennett Former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser has acknowledged newly obtained diplomatic cables from the period after Indonesia invaded East Timor in 1975 suggest his government was warned of a looming humanitarian disaster. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/new-evidence-suggests-australia-failed-to-act-soon-enough-to-he/4996412 37. Australia agrees to take 500 Syrian refugees under UNHCR crisis plan Oliver Laughland Australia has joined 16 other countries in agreeing to take additional Syrian refugees to help combat a displacement crisis in which 2 million Syrians have fled its civil war. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/03/australia-accepts-500-syrian-refugees?CMP=soc_568 38. Search called off for survivors of asylum boat sinking Australian Associated Press Indonesian search and rescue has recovered 42 bodies, many of them children, and 10 remain missing, believed drowned http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/03/search-called-off-for-survivors-of-asylum-seeker-boat-sinking?INTCMP=ILCNETTXT3487 39. "I've lost all hope that I can have a life here" Emily Howie Four years after the civil war ended, many Tamils have no expectation of peace or safety in Sri Lanka's Northern Province. This is what drives boat migration http://inside.org.au/ive-lost-all-hope-that-i-can-have-a-life-here/ [b]CLIMATE[/b] 39. Why China Wants Renewables, Stat! Bernard Lagan September 27, 2013 Australian Government figures released in April 2013 show that there are another 57 Australian coal mines – or expansions of existing mines – being planned and another 16 at the committed stage. (A report published by Greenpeace says there are 91 coal projects that Australia “can’t afford”.) http://www.theglobalmail.org/feature/why-china-wants-renewables-stat/703/ Indonesian Island Goes Renewable Rebecca Henschke Thanks to new bio-gas and hydro projects, the Indonesian island of Sumba will soon run on clean energy. For many Sumbanese, it's the first time they've had electricity. https://newmatilda.com/2013/09/30/indonesian-island-goes-renewable [b]EDUCATION[/b] 40. Australia's top universities lose ground in latest Times Higher Education world rankings index ABC/AAP Only five of Australia's ranked universities gained ground, with the other seven all suffering falls. Rankings editor Phil Baty says the poor performance should be a reality check for Australia. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/australias-top-ranked-universities-drop-in-latest-world-rankings/4995942 MEDIA 41. Don't panic - there are plenty of media jobs Margaret Simons If being a journalist meant working in a traditional newsroom, the next generation would have reason to be concerned. But it doesn't and they don't http://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-03/simons-there-are-plenty-of-media-jobs/4991956 TODAY’S MAIN NEWS • ROULE REPORT — Issues of Today http://paper.li/RouleReport/1334728962 • ASHBYGATE http://tweetedtimes.com/#!/search/AshbyGate/en • AN EYE ON ABC NEWS: . Keeping the bastards who keep the bastards honest, honest http://www.abcnewswatch.blogspot.com.au/ • AUSTRALIAN NEWSPAPER FRONT PAGES www.thepaperboy.com/australia/front-pages.cfm • NEWS HEADLINES 4 October 2013 http://www.hotheadlines.com.au/

Casablanca

4/10/2013SUPPLEMENTARY ITEM: Abbott’s broken Indigenous promise and the Credlin omission David Donovan Tony Abbott was never sincere about spending his first week on Indigenous land; his chief of staff knew that but did nothing to correct the public perception. www.independentaustralia.net/.../

TalkTurkey

4/10/2013Several very sensible people here have expressed interest in the pharmacology of cannabis and its efficacy in treatment of ailments across the board. Oceans of evidence is available. Trouble is, the people who read it are mainly the already-converted, while the brain-controllers in the world of medicine trivialise it, the brainwashed doubt its on the basis that they don't know anything true about it, and the brain-dead go on being brain-dead. Well for those with open minds, here's a little bit of info. http://www.unitedpatientsgroup.com/resources/how-medical-marijuana-works

Truth Seeker

4/10/20132353, congrats and well done on your first post :-) And congrats also to the new TPS team :-) Although I haven't commented for a few days, (as I have been busy with other stuff) I have been regularly lurking, and it's good to see the level of involvement. Casablanca, well done on stepping up to fill the void left by our beloved Lyn… good job. :-) I have posted a few things over the last couple of weeks, and have just posted my latest poem [b]"The evil Prince Tones"[/b] :-) http://truthseekersmusings.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/the-evil-prince-tones/ Keep up the good work :-) Cheers :-) :-)

Michael

4/10/2013More roiling about Australia and Indonesia post Abbott's unctuous to the max 'performance' in Jakarta http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-04/cassidy-abbott-rises-to-his-first-foreign-policy-challenge/4996972 as The Abbott Error continues to unfold.

KHTAGH

4/10/2013Well done 2353, a well put together piece. Do you want to know what was really behind Murdoch backing Abbott in the election. News Corporation and Telstra have been in secret negotiations to launch a Foxtel-branded broadband service for more than a year but talks are stuck on the price Telstra would charge for access to its network. http://www.afr.com/p/business/marketing_media/foxtel_triple_play_deal_hits_nbn_savhh2mIXGIypv40I3FPcI Foxtel triple-play deal hits NBN snag

2353-

4/10/2013Truth Seeker & Knee High. Thanks for the compliments. It is interesting that there are consistent claims of a larger plan in progress here.

TalkTurkey

4/10/2013A couple of Tweets of mine that have been retweeted by others: Gordon Aplin retweeted (me) 5h (ago): When Ad & Lyn "retired" Did you think TPS was finished? NO! The Political Sword's rewired! We fight on undiminished!http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/post/2013/09/30/Truth-in-advertising.aspx? D Hamilton, BBus retweeted me 4h ago: @Gwilburtine @FitzyRJ @grumpyMichael @rupertmurdoch A man more evil than Hitler. Yes just die Murdoch. D Hamilton, BBus 4h: @smaccaroo @randlight Casablanca,taking up torch from Lynnie our TweetyBird (ret.)posts MANY select links HERE DAILY http://www.thepoliticalsword.com/post/2013/09/30/Truth-in-advertising.aspx?deletecomment=17de3b6b-2e4a-4751-b821-ca45a617cd6d … Mari R

Ken

4/10/2013TT Well done! Keep up the good work in spreading The Word.

TalkTurkey

4/10/2013VITAL VIEWING! Pyne v Emmo on TOWING the boats back yes, [b]TOWING![/b] Albericie being almost good. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yaLqyjb7Zo&feature=youtu.be&a

TalkTurkey

4/10/2013Casablanca Your categorising of issues might present new possibilities for debate, archiving and accessing past posts, dunno how eggzackly but in any case it's very helpful.

TalkTurkey

4/10/2013On Warren Mundine v David Donovan ... Who's the racist? http://yathink.com.au/article-display/ffsf-warren-mundines-racist-tweet-is-beyond-the-pale,94

Michael

4/10/2013Morrison says ALL the Coalition's announced policies, which included buying boats, sending the AFP into Indonesia, hiring village dobbers... ALL are still to be pursued. Abbott's in Indonesia. Will he back up his minister, or come over all 'young nephew' to Baba President again? The Abbott Error continues to unravel.

42 long

4/10/2013Marty will be keeping record of what is really happening. Morrison says they never said they were going to "tow" boats back. IF I watch this guy for long enough I know I will go MAD. What a line he plays to the media. Will they continue to play the game? High distinction in HYPOCRASY for the reporters if they do.

Catching up

4/10/2013It appears that Abbott does not go until tomorrow. Got to introduce his two daughters to Harry.

Michael

4/10/2013Catching Up, hi. Abbott's pretty darned good at being somewhere other than where we think/have been told he is, isn't he? Just another aspect of his innate capacity for duplicity. I hope the Abbott family all enjoy their sleepover at Kirribilli House. And wish that the bedbugs DO bite.

Casablanca

5/10/2013Boyer Lectures 2013: Back to the grassroots “It is an honour to have the Governor-General present this year’s Boyer Lecture series. Her distinguished and multifaceted career as an academic, lawyer, community and human rights advocate and vice-regal representative in Australia will provide for diverse and insightful content.. http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/boyerlectures/boyer-lectures-2014/4997366

Casablanca

5/10/2013Harmer & Hoopla In the new book What’s Next in Journalism? Wendy Harmer spills the beans on the inspiration behind The Hoopla and relishes the wonderful community it has become. My media consumption was moderate. I liked to listen to Radio National, and my online activity was limited to a daily whizz around the major news sites. No Twitter — had hardly heard of it. My engagement with Facebook was desultory. My attempt at my own website, half-hearted. Then, somehow, I fell head-first into the 24-hour news cycle and the social-media revolution, and someone pressed the button marked “fast spin”. http://thehoopla.com.au/hoopla-needed-like-hole-head/

TalkTurkey

5/10/2013 Mark Duckett The LNP just become more bizarre--> 'Coalition ‘never had a policy of towing boats back’, says Scott Morrison http://gu.com/p/3j9pf/tw #auspol Betty T ‏ @MarkRDuckett @DebbieFrail1 If no policy..what's this http://www.zimbio.com/Sri+Lanka/articles/qypKGKRLCgy/Tow+back+policy+asylum+seeker+boats+apply …

Catching up

5/10/2013Wonder why the Government continues with it's lies, when one can bring up, on the web, more that one place where they said "tow the boats back", on many occasions.

Michael

5/10/2013I stand to be corrected on this, but... Here: http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/senators-line-up-with-tony-abbott-to-axe-taxes/story-fn59niix-1226733284477# a story about enough of the incoming Senators from July 1 next year supporting the repeal of the 'carbon tax' and the mining tax meaning Abbott will most likely avoid having to call a double dissolution to achieve either repeal, includes some interesting counter-elements. One, the quoted newbie Senators also indicate they are unlikely to support the Coalition's Direct Action policy's legislative requirements - they'll vote OUT Labor policy, but won't necessarily vote IN Coalition policy. Seems like just the sort of stalemate that WILL conceivably necessitate a double dissolution. (This story is in The Australian, so a certain shizoid nature to it is to be expected.) Two, a quote from the same story runs so: 'Mr Abbott yesterday told 2GB radio that managing the Senate had been a challenge for previous prime ministers. "While it's not going to be easy and I'm going to have to treat every member of parliament, including every member of the Senate, with respect and courtesy ... I think we will be able to form an effective government in the Senate as well as in the House of Representatives," he said.' This is where I stand to be corrected, as Abbott's assertion "to form an effective government in the Senate" seems to me to be all about that "government in the Senate" being a form of minority government. Abbott said he would never lead a minority government (and he isn't, his majority in the House is manifest), but this fellow will essentially be doing deals with independents and minor parties in order to secure the passage of legislation, which Julia Gillard was harassed up hill and down dale for every day of her Prime Ministership. 'Bad' by Julia, 'good' by Tony???? OK, all past majority holders in the House of Reps have had to horsetrade in the Senate, but I don't recall a past PM speaking of forming an 'effective government in the Senate'. In short, Abbott's displaying again his complete ignorance of how the bicameral Federal Parliament works in Australia. He literally doesn't know what he's talking about by the evidence of the words he speaks. Effective government isn't formed in the Senate. Effective government is delivered by the ability to pass legislation through the House of Reps and have it ratified by the Senate, the house of review, before it is returned to the House of Reps for the final stage of its passage into law. That final stage is the assent of the Governor General. See here for all the ins and outs: http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/House_of_Representatives/Powers_practice_and_procedure/00_-_Infosheets/Infosheet_7_-_Making_laws The Senate governs nothing. It participates in the process of legislation. That a PM can believe "effective government (can be formed) in the Senate as well as the House of Representatives" simply displays both his ignorance, and his clear expectation of government control over both Houses. That the incoming Senators have already indicated that this will not be so, that it will continue to be issue to issue decision-making on their individual parts, makes it very clear (and again demonstrates the schizoid nature of the newspaper's article) that Abbott will most definitely NOT be forming an "effective government" in the Senate, and that for him to even think this either a likelihood or an aspect of what the Senate actually is and does, demonstrates equally all over again that he's paid so little attention to how Australia is actually governed for all his years in Canberra that Australia now has a gumnint with a leader with no sense at all of what his job actually is. (Or perhaps, more frighteningly, what its limits are.) Truly, we are living in The Abbott Error.

Catching up

5/10/2013Abbott, would love to see the DA blocked. I suspect that is their plan. Maybe we should let the so called tax go, and concentrate on saving the rest of the package. Even if to educate the public, what it entails. We should also be saying. yes let the tax go, but put up, in legislation, the Direct Action package, as you do so. There will be no DD. Abbott popularity, I believe is already on the downside. If this was not the case, we would be having polls, telling us, how popular the Abbott government is. I think this is what Tim Dunlop is about. The price on carbon emissions, on the biggest emitters. is not about increasing the cost of electricity, but funding the transfer to renewals. What is more important, is the rest of the CEFC package. Much that can be used in the Direct Action package of ABBOTT. Abbott stil does not tell us, how it is to be funded. I suspect, it is because he has no intention of proceeding down this path. We need to pick our fights. and not allow Abbott to divert our focus. Abbot will want the focus to stay on the word "tax'. We have learnt how potent that is. We need to divert the attention away from the word "tax", to what the tax is paying for. Should not be that hard. We know that Direct Action does not stack up.

Catching up

5/10/2013The Boyer Lectures should be interesting. Wonder if the GG expects to be gone, before the broadcast.

Ad astra

5/10/2013Casablanca I had a busy day yesterday so I completed your Cache last night on my tablet and this morning on the computer. It is yet another absorbing collection. After reading it, there is no need to bother with the MSM, particularly the print versions. Sales continue to fall and it’s easy to see why. Much of the MSM no longer represents truth; instead it portrays only the writer’s or the editor’s or the proprietor’s partisan view of events. There are so few balanced writers. What you are providing is a healthy, plentiful, and balanced diet of pertinent political material. How can the MSM compete? The way you are now dating CASABLANCA’S CACHE in the Page List places then neatly in descending date order. That is very helpful. The archives of CASABLANCA’S CACHE will be a priceless resource for all of us, week after week, and particularly when we are seeking historical information. As dated versions of CASABLANCA’S CACHE accumulate, Web Monkey will place them periodically in a master archive: CASABLANCA’S CACHE ARCHIVE. Users will be able to use it as an online library. Using an author’s name or a keyword, the ‘Search’ facility (under the Page List) comprehensively searches the archives as well as the rest of the site. We are deeply indebted to you for carrying on the great work that Lyn did for [i]TPS[/i].

Catching up

5/10/2013It appears the cocktail party is a private event of Abbott's.

Casablanca

5/10/2013An incisive article: [b]Labor may force an Abbott shutdown[/b] Jack Waterford How does this [Tea Partyism] get to Australia? Abbott made central to his oppositionism efforts to attack the authority, legitimacy and even balance of prime minister Gillard. Implicitly, she had no right to be there. By rights, he should be prime minister (presumably because two ex-Nationals should have supported the opposition). Therefore she had no right to respect, to dignity, to space within which to operate, or a certain scope for discretion within the governing framework. Nor were there any degrees to bastardry - it was all on everywhere all the time. http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/labor-may-force-an-abbott-shutdown-20131004-2v00s.html#ixzz2goK9IPOV

Catching up

5/10/2013...............The HMAS Leeuwin will take Prince Harry around the harbour to inspect navy ships, which are taking part in the International Fleet Review. He is expected to meet and greet onlookers at Sydney Harbour at some point in the day. Later this afternoon, he will again meet Mr Abbott with his daughters at Kirribilli House for a soiree. Although the 29-year-old visited Australia during a gap year in 2003, this will be the popular royal's first official visit representing the Queen. He is due to leave the country on Sunday....... http://www.skynews.com.au/topstories/article.aspx?id=912322&vId= Why are the daughters a part of today's programme. What have they done. to warrant a special show for their convenience.

Casablanca

5/10/2013Catching Up It is galling to see Tony Abbott as PM and it was particularly galling to see him pimping his daughters during the campaign. Nevertheless, under the new order of things 'The Bling Daughters' have a reasonable call on being part of the Navy Celebration. The celebrations are the biggest ticket in town this week-end & it's just that much easier to obtain a ticket if your dopey dad just happens to be head of government. Enjoy the celebrations and don't let the Bling Sisters get under your skin.

Catching up

5/10/2013Agree, but suspect the man should now be in Bali. Wonder why Canada did ot turn up?

Casablanca

5/10/2013My vague recall is that Canada decided to boycott the meeting because they objected to sitting down at the table with Sri Lanka over the human rights abuses there against the Tamils.

Catching up

5/10/2013 Two boats colliding back in August, does not seem to be much of a reason.

Catching up

5/10/2013I think we might be at cross purposes. No Canadian ships in the harbour.

Catching up

5/10/2013Abbott still has not told us when parliament is resume. Is that another secret. If so, why? As for Mr. Abbott and his DD, will someone tell him, that will be hard to do so, until well into next year. Why does not Obama line up something, to repeal, that the Republicans hold dear. The Republicans seem to think it is only a game, the same as Coalition does here. All about winning, not doing what is right.

Catching up

5/10/2013Is it about a century of our Navy,or is it about Prince Harry? The gushing we have been hearing for the last 24 hours has been sickening. I can remember a time, the female population, or a least some turned out in a similar fashion for his father. Wonder how many of those star struck women, would turn out today. Is Gemma ABC 24 in love with the man.

Catching up

5/10/2013Yes, the girls have turned up, once again in white, I believe. Family snaps now being taken. Have the family moved into Kirribilli House yet?

Austin 3:16

5/10/2013The thing is to control economic areas like growth and inflation governments have either monetary or fiscal policy. Monetary policy being the setting of interest rates and fiscal policy being taxation and spending (broadly speaking). Again, broadly speaking, both can affect discretionary spending. If taxes are low there's more money in our pockets to go out and spend stimulating economic activity. Again if interest rates are low we're paying less on our cars / mortgages / credit cards and we have more money to spend. Both on a business and personal level. Prior to Keatings reforms the government of the day could set both fiscal and monetary policy directly. Such as when Howard was treasurer and mortgage rates were capped at 12% although official rates peaked at 21% Nowadays the government controls fiscal policy and the reserve bank monetary policy. Obviously though it's best when both policies are working towards the same cause. But that's not always the case - if the government of the day gave a series of tax cuts then it's possible that such stimulus could have an inflationary effect such that the reserve bank considers raising interest rates. Conversely if the government ran a very tight fiscal policy that could slow growth such that the reserve lowered interest rates. So although interest rates are no longer in direct government control they could still be influenced by the economic policies of the government of the day. What's more interesting is that under Labor we had strong growth and low inflation. Something that eluded Howard.

TalkTurkey

5/10/2013TalkTurkey Twitter making me break bad. LOOK! @TonyAbbottMHR full of grace Wipe that brown stuff off your face! Sweet Prince Harry full of class Why'd you let him kiss your ( ! ) ?

Michael

5/10/2013Did Abbott's gels curtsy? I missed Prince Harry's arrival at the Kirribilli House wharf. Pity the Australian Navy wasn't 'launched' in 1912. PM Julia Gillard meeting Prince Harry for a 2012 centenary last year, two redheads might have had a lot to laugh about on that wharf. Like real people. Instead of Abbott somehow simultaneously channeling both Basil Fawlty and Manuel meeting Harry.

Catching up

5/10/2013Did not see them curtsy. Just seemed to be standing about awkward, not knowing what to do. As usual, did not appear to be much eye contact from our first family. Wonder what the paper was that the Prince took from the public, at the gates of Kirribilli House. Wonder it it was a petition.

Catching up

5/10/2013Watching rerun of Australian Story. The question is, can Abbott control Clive Palmer? I suspect not.

Catching up

5/10/2013I have just listened to what one can only call a bimbo. Asked about Prince Harry. Runs the government or something in England, going to become king or something. ABC 24

Catching up

5/10/2013The function at Kirribilli over. Harry back on a boat. I think Harry spent more time, meeting the people.

TalkTurkey

5/10/2013Oh Michael. You do have a way with images. Two redheads. Like real people. Oh yes that's right, *J*U*L*I*A* is, after all, a real person, yes. I sometimes forget ... She's always so perfect ... Instead of Abborrrtt being both Basil & Manuel at the same time ... Priceless.

TalkTurkey

5/10/2013Catching up you are priceless too. I think you must've been honed to a fine edge on other blogs ... so you are quick on your fingers. I'm hoping to catch the ABC Bimbo now ... :)

Michael

5/10/2013The Abbott gels curtsy???? Channel Nine News did some weird editing effect between Harry stepping onto the Kirribilli House wharf, walking forward, then "whoosh", jump cut to a second or three later. What was the News director covering up? Some gross act of failed due respect from The Ab-bott Familleee, diddley dum? A glimpse of Abbott filles' knickers?? Actually, who gives a toss! But suspicions are raised by edits and quick cuts in any and every medium of reportage - it's called altering the historical record, because even the tiniest moments 'fiddled with' throw out the truth. After all, for every piece of evidence to the contrary, apparently no Coalition politician before the election ever said it was party policy to "tow back the boats". Before the election, the mainstream Press glossed over every Abbott malapropism or physical tic displaying anything but 'calm, collected Tony', in order to make him look that much more "adult" than anyone in Labor. Do we really imagine that the same practices and mindset won't apply to his Prime Ministership, that he won't be displayed to us now, no longer the "most successful Opposition Leader ever", but as becoming before our eyes the 'best Prime Minister ever'? All it takes is control of gathering the media, control of how the media is presented, and control over how it is edited into the historical record. Beware the Credlinisation of all things Australian!

Michael

6/10/2013Abbott lets the taxpayers cover his trip to Mirabella's wedding: http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/abbott-repaid-wedding-travel-costs-20131006-2v1m9.html?skin=text-only Julie Bishop and Barnaby Joyce let the taxpayers cover their trips back from an Indian wedding: http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/mps-claim-travel-for-indian-wedding-trip-20131006-2v1me.html?skin=text-only Does anyone seriously believe that the culture of never putting their own hands into their own pockets is not embedded in Coalition politician's DNA? Warren Mundine, Abbott's coconut-supremo of 'Aboriginal' affairs, continues to be revealed as a particularly sorry sample of human being: http://www.smh.com.au/national/game-changer-20130930-2un5f.html?skin=text-only But, in context with the earlier stories, he's also the very examplar of a contemporary Australian Conservative.

TalkTurkey

6/10/2013me and my two cents ‏@mytwocentsandme 22h With all the love pouring in for JG, have you watched my tribute video to Julia? :) http://youtu.be/bBYgmN5TIsk @SummersAnne @JuliaGillard @smh This wordless tribute is enough to make one weep - &/or fight ever harder. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBYgmN5TIsk&feature=youtu.be

2353~

6/10/2013Michael, your link on Warren Mundine is interesting. I'm wondering if the real issue here is a sense of inadequacy. Sounds pretty tragic to all concerned actually (especially those he walked out on).

Michael

6/10/2013Insiders pushed the 'Abbott charmed the Indonesians' in Jakarta line. Even while broadly noting nobody knows nuttin' about what was practically achieved as a result of the 'charm'. More illuminating on this front was the Mike Bowers cartoonist section where the guest, who'd been in Indonesia at the same time as Abbott, declared that he'd never felt more tense as an Australian in Indonesia, on what was his 9th trip there. 'Laughable' was his take on Coalition boats policy as far as the Indonesian 'everyman' was concerned. Another point of close bilateral relationship, we think it's laughable in Australia, too. The Abbott Error continues. As to Warren Mundine, he's just an wanna-be arriviste, with exactly the same attitude about being amongst the "right people" as Coalition politicians bring to their 'entitlements'. Gimme. Didn't esteemed current Treasurer Joe Hockey have something to say about "entitlements", and how their 'age' had passed? Or was that only about everyone outside the tent?

42 long

6/10/2013Super diplomatic Tony is the new theme. A man of many skills.. Reality has nothing to do with what you read, about this matter. It is a situation of creating an outcome regardless of whether it happened or not. Are we being HAD? OF Course we are. Tony was just being horrible and telling lies because he was in opposition. A place that is obviously an injustice for someone of his stature.

Catching up

6/10/2013I have a feeling that Warren Mundine wife may have more influence, inside their community. It is the third marriage for Warren. It seems he blames his second wife of many years, and m,any kids, for the breakdown. Seems like she has also achieved much more than him.

42 long

6/10/2013Divorces and Catholicism. How do they mix? Warren seems to blame everything but the common denominator. HIM.

Catching up

6/10/2013Hockey off to New York next week. They say, he will make a point of visiting the rating agencies. Seems he wants a little wriggling room.

Catching up

6/10/2013Why does Abbott walk about with his mouth half open all the time. Does he have trouble breathing through his nose. He gives the impression, that he us saying ha ha ha all the time.

Michael

6/10/2013There's an expression about 'mouthbreathers'. From: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=mouthbreather 1. literally, someone who lacks enough intelligence that they never learned to breathe through their nose. 2. a really dumb person. In his latest work, the director has forsaken the indie audience and made something for the mouthbreathers.

Michael

6/10/2013On Insiders Michael Stutchbury asserted that the Abbott govt had successfully taken politics off the front page of the newspapers, and that travel entitlements were small beer. If so, that message doesn't seem to have got through to, of all 'people', News Limited. Here, in some detail: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/national/tony-abbott-repays-travel-costs-for-wedding-in-wangaratta/story-fni0xqrb-1226733507793

Michael

6/10/2013Also in News Limited, The Daily Telegraph: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/breaking-news/wedding-travel-costs-were-valid-turnbull/story-fni0xqi3-1226733657698 and dragging into the mix Malcolm Turnbull's judgement from his words on Insiders. All this reads like someone's seriously stepped on toes over at News. Or perhaps hinted they did it all on their own, and never needed Uncle Rupe's help anyway, so Uncle Rupe and Cousin Col are showing them just how 'news' in News works.

Michael

6/10/2013This is getting better by the minute. Abbott only repaid the money he claimed for Mirabella's wedding seven years ago in the last week. That is, as PM he's finally been moved to respond to an action undertaken when he was last a government minister. Makes you wonder how else (well, we know about the book tour, Pollies Pedal... just does pulling on his budgie smugglers qualify for taxpayer assistance, what about every time he 'volunteers' with his local fire brigade???) wonder how else and how often taxpayers have kept Tony Abbott from having to draw on his salary? http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/tony-abbott-repays-expenses-after-charging-taxpayers-to-attend-sophie-mirabellas-wedding-20131006-2v1ny.html This from the Fairfax Press. The mainstream Press Big Two allied in pursuing Coalition rorts? Who'd've thunk it? Not Abbott and Co I'm prepared to bet.

Tom

6/10/2013It's interesting that so many are willing to condemn Warren Mundine on the basis of a failed marriage and a decision to seek to progress indigenous issues via this government. It is narrow minded and disgraceful that people who don't know Mundine condemn him and his motivations so quickly How many will put their own lives, affairs and relationships up to scrutiny for the judgment of others?

Catching up

6/10/2013No, Tom, not condemned for marrying for the third time. A serial offender, that attempted to blame the wife. All the topic was bought up for, was a reason that Mundine has changed track in his career, ans the third wife might be the reason why. Saying the second wife might carry more weight than him in their community. I believe that Mundine has called racism for the criticism, he says he is getting. No, the man us being criticise for his actions. Nothing to do with playing up on his wife, even after she took him back. Yes, that is the story Warren supported. Funny when one dares to criticize any of Abbott's mob, we are he lowest of the low, when it comes to the likes of Tom.

Catching up

6/10/2013Abbott paid the money back last week. Bishop was named. Wonder how many will follow suit this week. Could even bring the budget back into surplus.

DMW

6/10/2013For those who are wondering when parliament will sit it is actually laid down 'in law' when the new parliament must sit. Courtesy of the Australian Electoral Commission: [i]The writs must be returned within 100 days of their issue. This is the latest date by which they can be returned but they can be returned earlier. The new Parliament must sit not later than [u]30 days[/u] after the due date for the return of the writs.[/i] http://www.aec.gov.au/Elections/Federal_Elections/2013/timetable.htm The last day the writs can be returned is Wednesday 13 November 2013. Therefore parliament must sit on or before Friday 13 December 2013. Can't see parliament sitting in December therefore my best guess is the week beginning either 18th or 25th November.
I have two politicians and add 2 more; how many are there?