• A home amongst the gumtrees
    A local real estate agent rings me every couple of months asking if I am
    willing to sell my house. So far he's tried the 'look how much you could
    get' strategy, 'the market is moving, you don’t want to miss out’ strategy
    and telling me he could help me buy another house if I did sell; to which my
    response was something like 'and you get two commissions - how does that help me’.
  • Now is not the right time . . .
    Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was buried last week with all
    the pomp and ceremony the occasion deserved. Regardless
    of your views on the monarchy, for a person to perform the one
    role for 70 years without a break is an awe-inspiring effort.
  • Pick up the phone
    The Conversation, a news website operated and funded by a number
    of universities, has published a significant number of articles on Prime
    Minister Albanese’s Jobs and Skills Summit. Most of them, as has most
    of the reporting of the ‘summiteers’ work, have been broadly positive.
  • Promises, promises
    The problem with the proposed tax cuts, the Jobs Summit, the emissions reduction
    target or any other policy that Prime Minister Albanese took to the election is
    that it was a promise that was made in the run up to the election. Certainly, the
    world has changed since 2019 and if really expensive tax cuts that benefit the better
    off were ever a good idea, there is even less evidence to suggest they are now.
  • The downside of lower unemployment
    In the middle of the ‘should Morrison go’ or should he stay
    brouhaha a couple of weeks ago, there was some interesting
    news to think about — Australia’s unemployment rate is likely
    to be under 5% for some years to come.
  • They seem to have a plan
    At the beginning of August, Prime Minister Albanese’s ‘preferred prime minister’
    measure according to Newspoll was 61%. While pretty well every new political
    leader enjoys some fair winds and sunshine at the beginning of their term of office,
    Albanese is doing better than most. He seems to be confounding the experts that
    suggested the ‘honeymoon’ with the Australian public was over a month earlier.

The Political Sword

Get the inside track on the media and government.

Chaos

Instinctively, you know what is meant by ‘chaos’. No matter when you turn on the TV or radio, there it is in every bulletin of world news. My dictionary defines chaos in this way: disorder, disarray, disorganisation, confusion, mayhem, bedlam, pandemonium, madness, havoc, turmoil, tumult, commo...

Read More

Fire and rain

James Taylor released ‘Fire and Rain’ in January 1970. Taylor’s song is about a number of his personal issues including drug addiction, professional upsets and the suicide of a friend. If it was released today it could have been a commentary on Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s current term in...

Read More

Unprecedented disasters – again

Queensland and New South Wales have recently suffered greatly as a result of literally flooding rains. Queensland Premier Annastasia Palaszczuk claimed In just two to three days, Brisbane received about 80 per cent of the rainfall it would normally get over the whole year. The same weather system we...

Read More

Rehashing the past – badly

Feeling some pain from the self-imposed ‘wedges’ of the religious ‘freedom’ legislation in the middle of February, Prime Minister Scott Morrison changed tack. According to Morrison, Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese’s ALP MPs were closet communist China sympathisers. Morrison isn’t the first to tr...

Read More

The Power Syndrome

What a contrast we’ve witnessed on our TV screens these last few weeks. As we tuned into the Winter Olympics we saw an almost endless display of skill, dedication, and self confidence. Although the participants were intensely competitive, they appeared to harbour no animosity towards their fellows. ...

Read More

The karma bus

It’s not hard to make the case that the karma bus found Prime Minister Scott Morrison in February 2022. A whole lot of poor choices made by Morrison and his colleagues over the past few years all combined to make February one to remember for all the wrong reasons. Morrison’s discomfort probably sta...

Read More

There are better options than tax cuts

Prime Minister Scott Morrison spent the Christmas break this year promoting Australia opening up to the world regardless of the increasing threat of yet another form of the COVID-19 virus. Morrison claimed that while there will be people in hospital and that others will die, the economic cost of ret...

Read More

Nah – you cant change the date

A couple of weeks ago it was January 26. Depending on your world view, that particular day has a name. Across Australia it is a public holiday and the current Federal Government gets very upset if local Councils don’t hold citizenship ceremonies on the day. We’re told our public holidays are always...

Read More

At the Morrisons on Christmas morn

On Christmas morning, Prime Minister Scott Morrison had a traditional start to the day. His family gathered around the Christmas Tree to exchange presents before heading off to church. They were all hoping for something extra from Santa because they have all had a rough year living through the resig...

Read More

End-of-year Greetings

Here we are yet again - at the end of another year, perhaps the busiest year politically since this blogsite began on 13 September 2008, 13 years ago. Time has not reduced the intensity of political discourse, it has increased it. Not only has the complexity of politics increased, but the manner...

Read More

The coalition vs public opinion

Those of us who are old enough to remember the Sydney Olympic Games will probably also remember there was some talk at the time that some countries were less than enthusiastic to compete because of Australia’s treatment of its First Nations people. Prime Minister at the time, John Howard, was under ...

Read More

The Morrison enigma

It’s becoming alarming. Every day our Prime Minister becomes more verbose, more shouty, more insistent. The old-fashioned word ‘blatherskite’ comes to mind. Listen to him as he fronts journalists, answers questions in Question Time, or delivers his characteristic off-the-cuff oratory on any subject ...

Read More

Lies, damn lies and economics

There must be a federal election coming — the infamous yellow and black Clive Palmer funded billboards have made a reappearance. One of the billboards has a statement that suggests COVID19 related restrictions and vaccinations are a waste of time because it is still possible to be infected. It’s cla...

Read More

Voter ID and dead cats

If you are over 18 you will be legally required to vote in a Federal Election between now and next May. If the Coalition Government gets its way, next time you vote in a Federal Election you will have to produce proof of identity before you are handed the ballot papers. The Coalition have been talki...

Read More

Invasion Day

No, we’re not getting in early for that date at the end of January. Although there is considerable substance to the claim from first nations people that Australia had a civilisation long before Arthur Philip turned up with a number of ships and people that were a social problem the English decided t...

Read More

Where has all the kindness gone?

Here is another brief offering. It does not need to be lengthy because its message is straightforward. It asks the question: “Where has all the kindness gone?” and its corollary: ”Why not be kind to one another?”. The September 25 issue of The Good Weekend featured an article titled The High Life...

Read More

Do the crime – do the time

The reason Dominic Perrottet became Premier of New South Wales is Gladys Berejiklian chose to join the select group of Liberal Party New South Wales Premiers that resigned before undergoing the scrutiny of a New South Wales Independent Commission Against Corruption public hearing. Of course, Berejik...

Read More

Should the cowboys rule?

For someone that claims to have Australia’s best interests at heart, Prime Minister Scott Morrison makes some strange choices. He originally claimed he wasn’t going to the Glasgow GOP26 Meeting of World Leaders because it would mean he would be required to undergo another two weeks of isolation. We’...

Read More

You have to adapt

Next time your mobile phone takes a photo of the now ubiquitous QR check in image, think of this. In 1888, the Kodak camera was first sold in the USA with the motto “You press the button, we do the rest”. People did ‘press the button’ and return the cheap camera box to Kodak for processing — at addi...

Read More

Looking after your mates

At the same time as the state governments around Australia are trying to re-establish the ‘greater good’ by promoting COVID-19 testing when feeling even slightly unwell and vaccination (because the inconvenience of a test or injection is far outweighed by the lessening of risk of others catching the...

Read More